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Old 03-22-2012, 04:08 PM   #21
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RE: My next boat

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islandmech wrote:
well, still looking for the next boat. Wondering if anyone has any info on Vantare yachts? I looked at a very nice 44 ft sun deck with 3208 cats. I do not know anything about this brand, who made them , hull construction, problems etc.
Any collective wisdom much appreciated

thanks, Gary
*Gary, I'd send a PM to a member named Dswizzler. He and his wife own a 58' Vantare and really seem quite fond of it.
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Old 05-31-2015, 08:16 PM   #22
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*And I may get in trouble here too. You're going from a Sea Ray that probably did 20 kts plus. Just be sure you're OK cruising at less than 10 kts and what restrictions you'll deal with vs your Sea Ray. It's a different type of boating. Not warning, just sayin.
Agreed, there are trawlers that are displacement only, round bottoms, and they roll in a beam sea. Very different from go-fast boats, which actually ride well because they have fat-assed sterns and hard chines (square sides) for planing, that resist roll.

My preference is for the latter, because you can always idle a big diesel, even motor on just one, like I do at times, but you can't push a Lehman 120 any harder than a rope.

That said, the key engine is the autopilot. Point your Lehman, sit out on the foredeck with your remote, and read your messages. That's cruisin' - being able to hear yourself think. - Best
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Old 05-31-2015, 09:45 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by djones44 View Post
Agreed, there are trawlers that are displacement only, round bottoms, and they roll in a beam sea. Very different from go-fast boats, which actually ride well because they have fat-assed sterns and hard chines (square sides) for planing, that resist roll.

Best
While a flat square wide stern might resist roll, once it gets to rolling the motion can be very snappy and uncomfortable...assuming you are not on plane.
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Old 05-31-2015, 10:44 PM   #24
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While a flat square wide stern might resist roll, once it gets to rolling the motion can be very snappy and uncomfortable...assuming you are not on plane.
Very true. One of the benefits of planing power, or a short plow, is to get out of an irritating sea and go for a run on some pretence. Sits well with the crew,too.
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Old 06-01-2015, 07:51 PM   #25
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This seems to be an old post that was resurrected for some reason. Just want to say that the hard chine hull with its snap roll is not always a problem if the boat has the reserve power to move out at mid teen k levels. I find when it gets a little rolly that the extra speed 15-16 K brings the boat up on top of the waves and my boat becomes more stable than most true hull speed trawlers which tend to slow down in those seas. The high powered sports fishing boats carry this technique to the extreme and bomb along at 30+K in significant seas. I learned this lesson when I used to sail a high speed multi hull which took waves much better at speed popping off the tops of waves rather than bashing into them. The main draw back to this technique in my present boat and previous lobster boat is a wet ride the WW need to be in good working order. The other benefit to this technique in places like the PNW is at 15K you are out of the bad seas in one to two hours while a displacement trawler that has to slow down may take a beating for 4 or more hours and end up at the anchorage having to scrounge for a spot. No doubt that if crossing big water for several days or a few weeks the round full displacement hull may be a wiser choice.
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Old 06-01-2015, 09:57 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by eyschulman View Post
This seems to be an old post that was resurrected for some reason. Just want to say that the hard chine hull with its snap roll is not always a problem if the boat has the reserve power to move out at mid teen k levels. I find when it gets a little rolly that the extra speed 15-16 K brings the boat up on top of the waves and my boat becomes more stable than most true hull speed trawlers which tend to slow down in those seas. The high powered sports fishing boats carry this technique to the extreme and bomb along at 30+K in significant seas.
This escape route saved me from dire possibilities when I was motoring up Johnstone Strait in BC in 2008. After leaving a wonderful lunch at a heavenly German cuisine shoreside eatery, we came around the corner of Johnston to face the NW coming down, on a rising tide. I don't know where the tides meet, but I do know they all get together there to think it over, and goose whoever's in the net.

I was. With my new wife I was in a Tolly 26' downgrading from a Canoe 37', as the Market wonted (cruel winds there...) and the 4' chop that presented was not taking offers. My wife banged her head, I took the helm. We couldn't just idle into this, as we were losing leeway and the east shore was granite and agitated all the way in (to a hard beach). Headed for shipwreck.

I recalled a similar incident off Lasqueti, trying to get back to Half Moon Bay, when I'd had a 26' Turner in 1976 (you could see green through the lapstrake in these seas). Must have been a 6' chop, rounding Texada, but definitely a no-go zone at idle. All smashed to pieces and soon, if I watched.

In both cases I reached down for two things I had taken care of: the running gear was in first class shape, and had sufficient power. In both cases I powered and coped until I had some altitude, and suddenly I was scooting across the wavetops, no issues.

Never forgot that, or ever want to lose it. Drive away from it.
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Old 08-08-2015, 11:22 PM   #27
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I think the prime criterion is "shed kept" for a PNW vessel. You could keep a Duncan Phyffe in a boat house, to no ill effect, whereas a DeFever will be on it knees in a decade in the rain.
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