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Old 01-12-2016, 08:32 PM   #81
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I agree about folks posting on something with no personall experience. But, first internet rule : Total lack of knowledge on a subject shall in no way inhibit ones ability to type. It may be like on some other forums that I visit, mostly gear heads or fishing types, where a guy asks a question and the resident poster says he doesnt know anything about it but someone will be along soon with the answer. Some people are like that in person, they just need to hear there head rattle.
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Old 01-12-2016, 09:04 PM   #82
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Talking about experience, I'd like to go back to the OP a moment. I would be very careful making a move as big as selling the RV for a trawler and wouldn't do so before spending considerable time on a trawler. There are people who like both but many people who like only boats or RV's and not the other.

It's not unusual for things that others consider insignificant to bother a person. As boat people we may be lousy as a group in expressing any negatives. There's the financial aspect, but there is a limitation as to where you can go. There's also a convenience issue as if you're traveling from place to place in an RV, you just pull over for groceries or anything else you need.

Just don't make the move too quickly.
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Old 01-13-2016, 01:23 AM   #83
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Having owned several RVs, a truck camper and two fifth wheels, one of which is parked outside, I was trying to remember any time that I had a problem with other campers. Only 1 incident came to mind, and that was partying Canadians celebrating July 1, Canada Day, late and loud in a State campground in eastern Washington, several years back, of course they were just as loud this past summer at Echo Bay in the Broughtons on July 1. I have had problems every year I have boated with boaters who don't know or abide by the rules of the road. I have found that after 100+ days on the boat this summer, I was tired after getting off and back home. With the fifth wheel it is always stopped when you are in it, and is just as comfortable as home. I would rather be driving the boat though than the RV. But doing both is good.
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Old 01-13-2016, 01:57 AM   #84
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We are never loud at Echo Bay on Canada Day. Oh, yeah, we were at Shawl bay.

I agree that it might be worth renting/chartering a boat before selling or swapping your motor home. If you have already gone that step then fine but if not, consider renting.

We have met people who have chucked it all and then found they did not like the boat and the reverse and in the process messed themselves up because they could not then go back. Not at least to what they had.

We do both, 5th, and boat.

Good luck in your decision.
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Old 01-13-2016, 09:19 AM   #85
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An old story comes to mind about a couple that sold everything and bought a boat. After awhile they found that they hated 3 things, the water, the boat, and each other. YMMV.
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Old 01-13-2016, 09:48 AM   #86
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Perhaps ask the same question you asked here on an RV forum. I bet your answers will be much different.
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Old 01-13-2016, 10:20 AM   #87
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We mostly relied on Best Westerns for lodging on last year's 3000-mile, over-ground trip. Usually, breakfasts were included. Neither specialized-vehicle depreciation nor high gas mileage experienced.
You'll take a Best Western with the free plastic breakfast over your own bed, bathroom, entertainment, favorite food and beverage in the fridge no check in check out time over bed bugs, 6 am BANG BANG HOUSEKEEPING!, Oh daddy daddy give it to me! screaming down the hall?

Right. To each his own.....

And yes, I've been in marinas and anchorages where poorly behaved boaters damaged the ambiance. It happens everywhere. On water, on land. Trick is to know the good spots.....

Assateague Island...... the ocean right on the other side of the dune..wild horses roaming around, neighbor 100 feet away, no sewer, $15/night... one of our previous rigs.
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Old 01-13-2016, 12:34 PM   #88
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Steve9506,

Unusual that your looking to go from motorhome to trawler. The "normal" progression is... 1) sailboat...> 2) trawler...>3) motorhome...> 4) nursing home. We've done step 1 and on step 2. We've done some limited camping, pup tents in Maine, pickup truck with cap in Canada, and most recently, a slide-in camper on a 4x4 F150. Got rid of the slide-in after my 14 year old, New England winter, salt damaged truck was destroyed to the point that it could not carry or tow anything.

It would profer that moving from motorhome to trawler is more involved than going the other way. I assume that your attraction with both options is to TRAVEL to points-of-interest, stopping along the way for short visits, and NOT to be hanging out in RV parks, or marinas. There's a big difference with the little risk involved in running a motorhome from Newport RI down to Norfolk VA, start of ICW, and doing the same thing in a trawler. The former is a 2-day trip on the I-95, and the latter is a 2-week run (longer if sight-seeing), taking inside and outside passages, dealing with benign to dangerous weather and water conditions, commercial traffic, and mechanical problems on open water. Picture a sudden squall, and your engine craps out with a clogged fuel filter, or a water pump impeller gets eaten up, and SeaTow or Boat US is a couple of hours away.

My point is that you'll need to pick up some experience before launching off on any long-range cruise. Long-time center console experience is a good start, but long-range trawler cruising requires some fairly extensive experience in navigation (old-school and electronics), minimal mechanicals (filters, impellers, engine maintenance fundamentals), anchoring-out skills, to name a few. The anchoring out while cruising is one of the more important and challenging issues to deal with. We've all had our experiences of pulling into a nice quiet harbor in perfect weather at the end of the day, dropping the anchor, having a nice quiet dinner, and going to bed, to be awakened at 2 AM in a sudden thunderstorm or squall, blowing gusts to 50 knots plus, and your anchor dragging. That's turned off many a couple quickly off the water and back to the motorhome. At our boatyard, we have a couple of people that had that experience, walked away from the boat. or still have the boat, but haven't taken it off the dock since (a floating dock-bound condo).

If you make the change, get more cruising experience before launching off on any long-range cruise.

Since the norm is to go from trawler to motorhome, you might be able to catch someone making that change with an even swap. Check out and post to the Nordic Tug forums like NENTOA or SENTOA. You're 2014 Dutchstar, with an average retail of $280,000 could get you into a 2003-2005 Nordic Tug 37.

John B (50 years on the water, sail and trawler)
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Old 01-13-2016, 05:03 PM   #89
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Steve9506,

Unusual that your looking to go from motorhome to trawler. The "normal" progression is... 1) sailboat...> 2) trawler...>3) motorhome...> 4) nursing home. We've done step 1 and on step 2. We've done some limited camping, pup tents in Maine, pickup truck with cap in Canada, and most recently, a slide-in camper on a 4x4 F150. Got rid of the slide-in after my 14 year old, New England winter, salt damaged truck was destroyed to the point that it could not carry or tow anything.

It would profer that moving from motorhome to trawler is more involved than going the other way. I assume that your attraction with both options is to TRAVEL to points-of-interest, stopping along the way for short visits, and NOT to be hanging out in RV parks, or marinas. There's a big difference with the little risk involved in running a motorhome from Newport RI down to Norfolk VA, start of ICW, and doing the same thing in a trawler. The former is a 2-day trip on the I-95, and the latter is a 2-week run (longer if sight-seeing), taking inside and outside passages, dealing with benign to dangerous weather and water conditions, commercial traffic, and mechanical problems on open water. Picture a sudden squall, and your engine craps out with a clogged fuel filter, or a water pump impeller gets eaten up, and SeaTow or Boat US is a couple of hours away.

My point is that you'll need to pick up some experience before launching off on any long-range cruise. Long-time center console experience is a good start, but long-range trawler cruising requires some fairly extensive experience in navigation (old-school and electronics), minimal mechanicals (filters, impellers, engine maintenance fundamentals), anchoring-out skills, to name a few. The anchoring out while cruising is one of the more important and challenging issues to deal with. We've all had our experiences of pulling into a nice quiet harbor in perfect weather at the end of the day, dropping the anchor, having a nice quiet dinner, and going to bed, to be awakened at 2 AM in a sudden thunderstorm or squall, blowing gusts to 50 knots plus, and your anchor dragging. That's turned off many a couple quickly off the water and back to the motorhome. At our boatyard, we have a couple of people that had that experience, walked away from the boat. or still have the boat, but haven't taken it off the dock since (a floating dock-bound condo).

If you make the change, get more cruising experience before launching off on any long-range cruise.

Since the norm is to go from trawler to motorhome, you might be able to catch someone making that change with an even swap. Check out and post to the Nordic Tug forums like NENTOA or SENTOA. You're 2014 Dutchstar, with an average retail of $280,000 could get you into a 2003-2005 Nordic Tug 37.

John B (50 years on the water, sail and trawler)
I gather one key point from your post. There is one and only one reason to go from motorhome to trawler. That is a love of the water, a desire to be on the water, rather than land. If moving from place to place on the water doesn't bring you pleasure then it's illogical to do. If just being anchored or docked on the water isn't your thing, then it's illogical.

We spend about 280 days a year on the water. If you try to analyze or evaluate it financially or logically none of it makes any sense except for that overpowering element that we love to be on the water. We were out crossing to Nassau today. 197 nm., 10 hours. We loved every moment of the trip. We were out of the view of land for a while, we crossed the gulf stream. Things were a bit choppy (some would consider more than choppy). We could have flown here in an hour, been in the hotel at Atlantis, toured the area, far far less expensively and to the majority of people making far more sense. But we were in Paradise to us, Nirvana. I'm sure people in RV's get the same feeling. It's just here is where I want to, I need to be. You can't be a boat owner or boater if you're going to try to reason through it. Once hooked you just try to do it less unreasonably.

But then picture this. Today you can see the world and never leave your home, just do it virtually. Save tons of money. But it doesn't have that feeling. When I'm too old to go to sea, then I will go places virtually.

It comes down to whether you're driven to the water or not. We are insanely driven to be on it. Always have been, probably always will be. It's nothing new. When I was a teenager, if I was out on the lake in my boat, the world was so much better and I was at peace.

I have no idea why we're so drawn to the water and it doesn't bother me that I have no answer. I just accept it. If you are, come join us. If no, continue to enjoy RV'ing.
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Old 01-13-2016, 05:46 PM   #90
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I have no idea why we're so drawn to the water and it doesn't bother me that I have no answer. I just accept it.
That's a pretty good assessment, I think. I've always been drawn to the water stemming from my first years on the planet when we lived in Sausalito. While I do know why I'm so drawn to the water, specifically salt water, it's certainly not necessary to know or even understand the attraction in order to get everything possible out of the experience.

Traveling on land, while it can be very interesting and enjoyable and certainly exposes one to unique places and experiences, to us comes nowhere close to the experience of traveling on water.

This is one reason my wife and I have been so drawn to narrowboating in the UK; it combines the best of both worlds. For all practical purposes one is traveling on land, going from town to town through fantastic countryside and able to experience all the attractions of land--- fairs, pubs, cathedrals, rural countryside, beautiful scenery, fascinating history, you name it--- but one is doing it via vessel with many of the unique challenges and pleasures derived from traveling by water.

What I have written earlier about our observations of the people and the environment encountered in RVing is a big factor in our disinterest in the RV lifestyle. But the primary reason for both of us is that we find traveling by water, be it on our home waters or the narrow, winding canals of the UK or the new-to-us northern European waters to be far more challenging and rewarding than driving around on roads.

When we take a road trip, be it to the gorgeous St. Joe river in Idaho or the lobster ports of Prince Edward Island or through the fascinating region that is south-central France, it's a great experience but we always feel there is something missing. On our most recent trip, a month-long stay in France, we realized what it is. We're not out on the water. While we were having a great time, we missed our harbor porpoises and rafts of diving ducks and swirling green water and floating logs and rocky shores and seals and arbutus trees.

Driving to very cool towns in France like Albi and Roquefort and Cordes sur Ciel was a lot of fun, made even more so by the friends we were with. But we were merely driving through the environment and looking at it. On the boat, we are part of the environment.

Don't know if that makes any sense to anyone, but that to us is the difference between boating and traveling by road on land. Even when we're stopped for the night, when we're on a boat we are never removed from being an integral part of the dynamic, ever-changing environment that is the water. We're not observers, we are participants.
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Old 01-13-2016, 06:12 PM   #91
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Driving to very cool towns in France like Albi and Roquefort and Cordes sur Ciel was a lot of fun, made even more so by the friends we were with. But we were merely driving through the environment and looking at it. On the boat, we are part of the environment.

Don't know if that makes any sense to anyone, but that to us is the difference between boating and traveling by road on land. Even when we're stopped for the night, when we're on a boat we are never removed from being an integral part of the dynamic, ever-changing environment that is the water. We're not observers, we are participants.
People are amazed that we haven't traveled to Europe. Like at our anniversary they say, you should go to Paris to celebrate it. Well, the wait is because we want to travel Europe by boat. We'll certainly go inland to see things, but just arriving by water to a new location is special. I never felt the magnificence of the San Francisco Bay Bridge until I went under it. And, I hate to admit this since we are not sailors, but we chartered a sailboat and then went out and in during the course of the day. That was even more right. Suddenly, we were those beautiful paintings we'd seen. Our next destination is the Caribbean. Exploring all the islands is just a thing to be experienced from the water..for us.

We have family we like to visit in Myrtle Beach..family we adopted as our parents and sister. We can visit them three ways:

Air 1 hr 40 min. $200
Car 10 hr. 19 min. 684 miles so at 50 cents per mile $684
Boat 510-530 miles (depending on dips into marinas) 3 days or in a fast boat 2 days. I don't want to even calculate the cost.

Yet, I'm sure you know which way we choose if at all possible.
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Old 01-13-2016, 07:07 PM   #92
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People are amazed that we haven't traveled to Europe. Like at our anniversary they say, you should go to Paris to celebrate it. Well, the wait is because we want to travel Europe by boat.

I'm not a huge fan of Paris. It is very well worth seeing as it's history and art and all the rest of what makes Paris Paris is terrific. But we're not really big-city people.

To my wife and I the coolest thing about Paris is the same thing that's the coolest thing about London: the Seine in the case of Paris and the Thames in the case of London. Working rivers through big cities are fascinating to us.

If you could arrive in Paris by boat and tie up for however long you wanted to be there I think you two would find that absolutely enthralling. The quays on either side of the Seine are set up to accommodate liveaboard and transient vessels along certain stretches. Many of the things you'd want to experience are within walking distance of the river and of course there are the subway and RER rail systems as well as rental bikes.

Photos are from our visits to the city and show a couple of Seine "RVs". Actually they are permanent residencies. The owners live aboard and the city lets them park their cars on the quay next to their boats. The cathedral in the background of the first shot is Notre Dame, the big building in the background of the second shot is the Louvre. Boats are held off the quay by spring-loaded poles to act as shock absorbers against the wakes of the tour boats and big self-propelled cargo barges that are constantly on the move on the river.
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Old 01-13-2016, 07:21 PM   #93
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We (particularly me) are fond of traveling on trains in Europe: the "civilized" way to travel on land. Costs are reasonable in Europe; not so much in the USA.
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Old 01-13-2016, 07:26 PM   #94
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We (particularly me) are fond of traveling on trains in Europe: the "civilized" way to travel on land. Costs are reasonable in Europe; not so much in the USA.
Once when I was young I was on a train but other than that neither of us have traveled on one. We will one day perhaps, just for the experience.
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Old 01-13-2016, 08:02 PM   #95
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Once when I was young I was on a train but other than that neither of us have traveled on one. We will one day perhaps, just for the experience.
Mark is correct in writing that European trains are far superior to the few remaining passenger trains in the US and Canada. We use the TGV to move between regions in France, for example, and they're fast, glass smooth, and now non-smoking.

Of course an easy thing to forget is that Europe is very small compared to the US and Canada. France, for example, I believe has a smaller area than Texas. So you can get just about anywhere from just about anywhere else in just a few hours at most by train.

And for those who want to tour Europe and the UK by motorhome you can "drive" it across the English Channel on the train through the Chunnel.
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Old 01-13-2016, 11:06 PM   #96
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These guys do. The "Q"

Looks like the big winter gathering at Quartzite AZ. We don't participate in those kind of things. With the millions of acres of BLM land, it's hard to figure why people do that. We see many group cruises on the water, and there are many group gatherings for RVs. That's not really our thing. We are travelers and transients. Of course we will make an exception for the TF SE Florida winter gathering.

That reminds me . . . . . . . .
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Old 01-13-2016, 11:10 PM   #97
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These guys do. The "Q"

Is that what happens when you do something bad in life ?
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Old 01-13-2016, 11:24 PM   #98
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There is a difference between RVers and boaters. When RVers get together they sit around drinking, eating and telling lies. Boaters? When they get together they sit around drinking, eating, and talking about joker and duck bill valves. But then RVers talk about the dreaded pyramid.
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Old 01-14-2016, 05:42 AM   #99
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How about gooseneck trailer?

If you don't have those either, a fifth wheel is like a trailer of a tractor trailer rig where the trailer attachment is forward of the rear wheels (say in the bed of a pickup) instead of on or under the bumper.
Ok, right...with you now. Yes, we have those, though not hugely popular, as most folk who want to go that big will go for a motorhome. Many of the roads caravaners traverse to popular places here in Aus and NZ are not really suitable for rigs like that.
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Old 01-14-2016, 06:24 AM   #100
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Quick question for you RV guys. Advantages or disadvantages of a class A vs a 5th wheel.
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