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Old 01-11-2016, 09:05 AM   #21
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We have been doing both the boat and a travel trailer. A recent purchase is a late model 25' Airstream. I just pulled back from Syracuse, NY to Chattanooga, TN averaging 14.3 mpg. We are all set up for boondocking in the RV and anchoring in the boat. So, no overnight charges when doing that. I can camp at National Parks for $12.50/night. Try that in a marina. All the while enjoying some of the most beautiful scenery on the planet. In short we love 'em both, but someday before long will have to decide between the two. Don't look back. Old age may be gaining on you.
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Old 01-11-2016, 09:54 AM   #22
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. A recent purchase is a late model 25' Airstream. .
That is the rig we are looking at too. Great choice IMHO and would permit us to spend several weeks each way as we go from AZ to BC.
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Old 01-11-2016, 10:34 AM   #23
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I'd be interested but your rig is about ten times too big.
Haha .. and you probaly would'nt be interested in our small boat.

Having thoughts about a small trailer or fuel efficient small motor home. I could just get a small and light trailer and pull it w our old Suburban. Or even a stick shift sedan that had fairly low gearing. My Jetta that I sold comes to mind. Some transmission expert told me not to pull a trailer w my present car .. 13 Honda Accord w a CVT trans. If the CVT held together it would be ideal for pulling power and "gearing".

Perhaps a good old 300D Mercedes sedan with a good match of trailer?
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Old 01-11-2016, 10:50 AM   #24
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Eric: Size is the thing. Whatever you want to take with you on your road trip, you need the power to take it along. In boats it is well known as 2 ft itis. Same thing exists in camping. We started smaller, but are now happily carting 44000 lb of Motorhome and gear wherever we go. Galley up, Single, but our anchor is no style you have ever used.
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Old 01-11-2016, 11:20 AM   #25
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I also have a boat and a travel trailer and we use them both, but not for long distance RVing or cruising, just for long weekend and infrequent weeklong trips.


If you want to see the waterways like you RVed across country it will be difficult to do both unless you do a winter/summer split. And of course there is the financial side of owning and maintaining a half million $ investment.


But as I said in my earlier post, the skills and consequences of boat operation are quite different from a motor home.


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Old 01-11-2016, 11:34 AM   #26
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We do both, 18 years we lived on the Eagle and also had a small motor home and 19ft runabout for week ends and vacation. 2years ago I retired so we bought a newer 31 ft clasd A, and pull the Land Rover. So the summer months we live on the boat and the winter months traveling south. We plan on traveling the US for 3 to 4 years looking forward areas to retire to in the winter. We will keep the Eagle as a summer base.

The Eagle cost an average of 1, 500 per month and the costs about the same, maybe more as we travel a lot.
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Old 01-11-2016, 12:20 PM   #27
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We've never done any RV'ing so only have impressions of it, no experience.

We love the water too much to have the land desire. However, if something happened and we could no longer boat, then we might consider it.

Still, one argument comes back to tell me RV isn't for us. Now this argument is even more valid for boating but doesn't dissuade me there. That is you could drive a car and stay in the nicest hotels there are for less than it costs you to go by boat or RV.

I don't feel like we'd choose to RV but we'd probably rent one to see. It comes down to whether we'd rather drive our car, stay in 4 and 5 star resort hotels or go by RV and stay one the RV. The first thought would be we'd choose the car and hotels. However, in all our cruising we've never once chosen to stay in a hotel. Maybe we would feel the same about an RV.
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Old 01-11-2016, 12:41 PM   #28
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BandB:


There is one consideration that your drive and stay at 4-5 star hotel alternative is lacking: a primary enjoyment that I get out of RVing is sitting around the campfire at night with a nice bourbon in hand, talking with my wife or occasionally neighbors or just contemplating my navel. You can't do that at a hotel.


The same is true for boating: hanging out at anchor enjoying the world going by.


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Old 01-11-2016, 01:03 PM   #29
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A lot depends on how much you like to eat out. We don't very often, so we take our kitchen with us wherever we go, boating or MHing. We have also moved up market to the best RV sites we can find, and the best boating destinations we can find, be they at our YC outstations or at anchor by ourselves in a secluded cove. We can surround ourselves with friends wherever we go, so get to enjoy the happy hour companionship, or not, as we please. Can't do that in a hotel, as David observed. Also we hate air travel, waiting for connections, packing a tiny suitcase with not enough stuff, etc. We already get more than enough of that, having a daughter with our only grandkids in Europe that we go regularly to see.
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Old 01-11-2016, 01:07 PM   #30
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'Scuse me...but what's a fifth wheel..? Some unique American-speak for something we have a different name for obviously, but what exactly..? Nothing has just 5 wheels...is it Yank slang for a towed vehicle which we call a caravan, but you guys call a trailer...(as opposed to a motorhome or motorised caravan), which we sometimes call a campervan if of the smaller variety...or something entirely different?
The "fifth wheel" is the disk looking hitch that sits over the rear axle(s). It's a term from the commercial trucking world, which has found it's way into the RV world as well. This style trailer is referred to as "a fifth wheel" or "fiver".

The pin under the overhanging part of the trailer is called, the pin.

Because the pin weight is centered over the axle(s) it allows for a greater trailer weight than a "tag along" or "bumper hitch" (which nowadays are steel tubing bolted to the chassis.)

Since there is no "arm" in the forces the trailer exerts on the TV (tow vehicle) there is no "tail wagging the dog".

Our setup: (the camper, the hitch is a generic picture although I do have that model.) It has air bags in it to dampen the action of the (3500+) pound pin weight.
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Old 01-11-2016, 01:12 PM   #31
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Still, one argument comes back to tell me RV isn't for us. Now this argument is even more valid for boating but doesn't dissuade me there. That is you could drive a car and stay in the nicest hotels there are for less than it costs you to go by boat or RV.
Yup, but the money isn't all of it. I spend 120+ nights a year in very nice hotels, and the LAST place I want to be on my days off is in a hotel.

I park the RV in the driveway, we load up the fridge etc etc and, just like a boat we have our own house with us and sleep in our own bed, toilet, shower etc.

On the road I pull into a truck stop, diesel up, and pull into a parking spot. Fire up the APU, have dinner, take a shower, watch some TV and take a nap. Next morning breakfast and back on the road without having to talk to ANYONE. No nasty receptionist, neighbors banging on the walls..... just happily in my own house. Wife hasn't used a public restroom in 10,000 miles.

When we get to where we're going it's set up in minutes, and yes, like marinas there's always interesting people to meet at the campground.
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Old 01-11-2016, 02:45 PM   #32
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A fifth wheel is called a turntable down under.
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Old 01-11-2016, 02:48 PM   #33
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See, we find marinas inviting and great, but having never been to an RV campground, or for that matter, any campground, that's a huge unknown to us. I can say the idea of sitting around a campfire drinking bourbon doesn't appeal to us. Now for the big reveal/confession. Neither one of us has ever camped out on land. Never even in a tent in the back yard as a child. It's on our list of things to do one day.

Ok, just corrected by wife in that we have spent the night on the beach. That does appeal to us. Much like spending the night on a flybridge out in the ocean, just us, the moon and the stars, the gentle breezes of salt air from off the ocean. So guess we can relate to that aspect.

We know many people find RV travel great so love reading about it here and how it compares. Right now we have more than enough places to explore by water so not going to land travel yet. Maybe one day.

Oh, and someone mentioned flying. Yes, often suggested to us by non boaters. I've not flown professionally like many here but I've flown so many hundreds of thousands of miles in my career that I'd be happy never to fly again. It's only for me a way to get back and forth to the boat.
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Old 01-11-2016, 05:38 PM   #34
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See, we find marinas inviting and great, but having never been to an RV campground, or for that matter, any campground, that's a huge unknown to us..

We have friends who are into RVing, long distance and local, and we have visited them on occasion over the years in their RVs at the spots they happened to be in. These places have varied from National Parks to RV campgrounds at the ocean, in the woods, etc.

Never say never, but neither my wife nor I can even imagine a worse way to travel. Jammed into RV parks or crowded RV campgrounds, surrounded by the kind of people we can't stand to be around that are constantly making noise and wanting to "include" you in whatever they happen to be doing. Very nice of them, true, but no thanks. We don't travel to be with, see, or hear crowds, we travel to get away from them.

We love road trips, short and long, and take them constantly, work and other occupations (like boating) permitting but we will rent a cabin or if necessary stay in motels. For example this coming weekend we are driving hundreds of miles north to be taken by raft down a river through the middle of some 3,000 feeding bald eagls. We'll stay in a cabin the two nights we're there. So driving is something both of us very much enjoy, even for long distances. Our longest drive in a single 24 hour period to date had been a something over 1,000 miles on the way south from Prince Edward Island a few years ago. It was great.

But the whole RV scene is just bizarre in our opinions. It was bizarre back in the late 1970s when a good friend and I took my Land Rover to the Yukon for five weeks of camping, canoeing and fishing and it is WAY more bizarre now.

Some of the rigs are cool, no question, the aforementioned Airstream products in particular. So it's not the means of travel that puts us off, it's the company one is forced to endure while traveling.

We have one set of friends who last year bought a trailer and truck specifically set up for what they call "off grid" RVing. They feel exactly the way we do about the RV scene, so they in essence go "off-roading" with their truck and trailer which is set up to be totally self-sufficient for a fairly long period of time.

He's an avid fisherman and his work schedule is such that they can go to all sorts of fairly remote areas in the Washington/Oregon/Idaho/Montana area and camp near good fishing rivers and streams. They find remote roads to go up and camp or get permission from nearby farmers or ranchers, and so on. Most of the time, they are the only people there. Next year he and I are planning to go to a river high up in BC for some steelhead fishing and we'll take his rig and stay in the toolies.

So that kind of thing my wife and I could see doing down the road a ways. But the standard RV scene? No way in hell.

So BandB, in my opinion, given how you use your boats and where you go with them, you are not missing anything at all with regards to the RV scene in my opinion. I suspect you would find it as bizarre and annoying as we have observed and experienced.
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Old 01-11-2016, 06:03 PM   #35
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Marin:

Certainly there are lots (and maybe most) of campers who like commercial campgrounds where you back into your 40 x 20' slot and hang out at the pool or playground and crawl in your palatial RV after dark to watch TV, but that is not our style.

For the last two years since we moved back to Connecticut we have camped a couple of dozen nights and for at least half of them we didn't have anyone close enough to even see their campfire. These were state and US forest service campgrounds. Yes, National Parks are crowded, but even with those I can enjoy my bourbon late at night around the campfire. And they always have fantastic scenery to enjoy during the day away from the campground.

And I have towed my smaller camper years ago behind my 4 wheel drive SUV to totally remote "dispersed" campsites where there probably wasn't another human for a mile in every direction. Don't do that anymore though.

So it isn't all as bad as you say, just bad for the maddening crowd.

But some of the same applies to boating. You do understand the term "dock queen".

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Old 01-11-2016, 06:04 PM   #36
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Motorhome vs. Trawler

Agree with Marin. Only RV I would consider would have to be Unimog (or similar) based. Thank goodness Polk didn't succeed in his fifty four forty or fight idea.
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Old 01-11-2016, 06:24 PM   #37
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LOL: Had to look up Unimog. What a cool looking vehicle!
No, There aren't any of those in our RV Park. Wouldn't meet the minimum length rule.

Marin: The first year we were doing the winter in Ca thing, we went to some of the other parks owned by the same Company that has a good one in Palm Desert. Didn't want to stop. We had found the places where old RVs go to die. Kept looking over our shoulders to see if someone was playing banjos to the tune from Deliverance. So yes, I know exactly what you mean. We also found some really nice State Park campgrounds, with lots of room, quiet, and nobody making you want to go inside and turn on the TV.

Some anchorages are like that too.
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Old 01-11-2016, 06:50 PM   #38
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One of the pleasures of traveling can be eating out. Unfortunately, small-town USA can make it difficult to find a good meal. Leastwise that was our experience in last years' road trip to Canadian glaciers traveling through eastern Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. Nevertheless, the scenery was worth the 3000 mile trip.

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Old 01-11-2016, 07:02 PM   #39
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Marin:


But some of the same applies to boating. You do understand the term "dock queen".
David--- You're point is well taken, and it sounds like you use your RV rig in a way somewhat similar to the friends I described earlier.

I think one difference, albeit perhaps more psychological than physical, between RVing and boating is that with a boat, even if one is at a popular marina or harbor, there is still the feeling of being "remote." Perhaps it's something to do with being on the water which in itself is a fluid, flexible, here-today-gone-tomorrow sort of environment which by its very nature creates a somewhat risky-feeling environment.

An RV, on the other hand, is just a glorified station wagon and it's in an environment that poses no threat, no risk, and is one just about everyone is totally at home in. The qualifications for RVing are zero outside of possessing a driver's license. Navigation is a snap and is without risk--- one might get lost depending on one's map/GPS/sense of direction skills but the roads are fixed in position and they don't get nasty and dangerous when the wind blows or the tide goes in and out. Driving at night is no different than driving during the day.

What this means is that RVing, unlike boating, is open to everyone because everyone can do it with no risk or sense of unknown to any of them.

Now we all know there are plenty of unqualified, irritating, bozo boaters out there. Every report I see on this forum of people getting waked along the ICW bears that out and we've all probably been in harbors with loud, obnoxious boaters nearby--- your referencing dock queens is spot on in many of these cases.

But the RV world seems to possess a whole lot more of this kind of personality in our observation. And, even in a crowded harbor, there is still a strong sense of privacy when it comes to boats. In our experience--- and maybe it's a regional thing, I don't know--- people rarely walk up to someone's boat and start a conversation or start telling you their life stories or describe in minute detail the knee surgery they just had. A boat, for whatever reasons, seems to present a pretty strong barrier to that kind of familiarity.

But this does not seem to be the case in an RV park. Everybody seems to want to know everything about everybody else, and worse, seems determined to tell everybody else about themselves. An RV is just a vehicle parked in a space--- there does not seem to be any real privacy associated with this.

Sit on the aft deck or flying bridge of your boat at a dock and most dock walkers will leave you alone. Or they might say something generic like "nice day, isn't it" or whatever as they walk past. But that's not what we saw in the RV parks. Sitting outside your RV at the picnic table or in a lawn chair is liking putting up a huge flashing neon sign that says "Come talk to us about whatever you want to talk about for as long as you want to talk about it." Because that's what seems to happen all the time.

And that is exactly what we don't want from our exploring-our-world experiences. I can get that at work.
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Old 01-11-2016, 07:08 PM   #40
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Sad.......
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