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Old 04-09-2012, 06:29 PM   #1
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Most needed parts for a long trip

I'm getting ready for a Bahamas trip and trying to decide what parts I need.
I can't buy and store all the hoses, injectors, pumps, etc that may go wrong so I was thinking what I really need is something that can repair or replace several things. Like a leaky or split hose. Anything you guys can recommend that will patch a engine hose. How about a fuel line. I just replaced a high pressure fuel line due to chafing, but in a pinch, is there anything that can patch such a hose? Can't splice it because of the metal wire winding on the inside and it has special connectors that are press fit. Duct tape won't work here.

Any suggestions??
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Old 04-09-2012, 09:39 PM   #2
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Try.......

Rescue tape works well for many purposes, both high and low pressures. It is sold in most marine stores.
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Old 04-10-2012, 08:12 AM   #3
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Rescue tape works well for many purposes, both high and low pressures. It is sold in most marine stores.
I carry a roll of rescue tape. I've seen it work on TV so it must work in real life, right?

My most important tool/spare part is my TowBoatUS membership card.
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Old 04-10-2012, 10:44 AM   #4
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Rescue Tape

Well I've used rescue tape to save my bacon on a lower coolant hose off the coast of Northern Ca. It worked as advertized.
There are items that you really should include in your list of backup items.
Water pump impellers , replacement belts, filters, and fuses ,breakers. and any unique molded hoses. In general things that can cause a life threatening event keeping you from getting to safety.
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Old 04-10-2012, 11:07 AM   #5
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spares...

plumbing

We normally carry about 10' or so lengths of every size hose we have on the boat. We also carry a spare for every pump on the boat

electrical

We carry every type of wire, connectors, switches, etc...

propulsion & generator

We carry spare filters, oil, relays, belts, senders, etc...

We boat a long way from any port. A simple potable water pump failure for example would ruin a trip. Why not carry a spare?
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Old 04-10-2012, 11:31 AM   #6
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spares...

plumbing

We normally carry about 10' or so lengths of every size hose we have on the boat. We also carry a spare for every pump on the boat

electrical

We carry every type of wire, connectors, switches, etc...

propulsion & generator

We carry spare filters, oil, relays, belts, senders, etc...

We boat a long way from any port. A simple potable water pump failure for example would ruin a trip. Why not carry a spare?
Here!Here! on ths one... Nothing more frustrating than no fresh water at the taps when you have a couple hundred gallons on board.

My philosophy on this one is plumb 2 pumps into the system...one for the forward areas...one for the aft main stateroom area with an interconnect between the two. Less wear and tear on each one so hopefully longer lives ...plus on a really long trip....a spare can be carried and there always seems a need for a loose pump to check or transfer something!
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Old 04-10-2012, 11:42 AM   #7
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Here!Here! on ths one... Nothing more frustrating than no fresh water at the taps when you have a couple hundred gallons on board.

My philosophy on this one is plumb 2 into the system...one for the forward areas...one for the aft main stateroom area with an interconnect between the two. Less wear and tear on each one so hopefully longer lifes ...plus on a really long trip....a spare can be carried and there seems always a need for a loose pump to check or transfer something!

We have fresh water heads.

Nothing worse that a couple heads that cant be flushed because of the lack of a $100 pump.
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Old 04-10-2012, 11:48 AM   #8
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We have fresh water heads.

Nothing worse that a couple heads that cant be flushed because of the lack of a $100 pump.

You can also plumb a fresh water pump to use as raw water cooling for the engine if you loose the raw water pump. You may not be able to run WOT but at least you can get back to port.
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Old 04-10-2012, 11:51 AM   #9
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On one hand, you don't have any spare parts. On the other hand, you have two or three of everything and have no room to store them, they weight down the boat, and they deteriorate in storage (rubber parts, mostly).

Somewhere in between is where we should be, depending on our boating habits and our ability to actually diagnose and repair problems. And of course, it doesn't help to have the parts if you don't have the tools you'll need.

My boat came with a spare prop. I can't change it myself but it's still on the boat. I suppose if I need it someday, at least I won't have to wait for parts. I will have to hire a pro to change it, though.

So, I have an impeller, filters, a set of belts, electrical connectors, hose clamps, and a pretty good assortment of tools.

And as I posted above, a current TowBoatUS membership card.
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Old 04-10-2012, 12:17 PM   #10
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I think one of the most important things to have on a cruise is enough fluids so if you have a leak or for whatever reason loose your coolant, lube oil, hydraulic steering fluid/oil or whatever other fluid you have enough on board to replenish same. Hoses are a problem as we have so many types and sizes.
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Old 04-10-2012, 12:50 PM   #11
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I've spent many months screwing off in out of the way places. started cruising the Bahamas in 1972 on my Grandparents trawler, made 10 or more trips on my own boat in the last twenty years. You'll be amazed at the fixes you and fellow cruisers can come up with with limited parts and no west marine. There's plenty of help out there and good cruisers save eachothers asses all the time!For hoses some bicycle tube wrapped around with a hose camp or two has saved me before, but the best thing to bring is beer and lots of it. The farther out you go the more valuable the stuff becomes.Can be traded for damn near anything!
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Old 04-10-2012, 06:32 PM   #12
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I think one of the most important things to have on a cruise is enough fluids so if you have a leak or for whatever reason loose your coolant, lube oil, hydraulic steering fluid/oil or whatever other fluid you have enough on board to replenish same. Hoses are a problem as we have so many types and sizes.
I forgot to mention those fluids. Yep, I carry spare fluids.
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Old 04-10-2012, 09:15 PM   #13
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Bailing wire, safety wire, tie wire. Whatever you wish to call it to make yourself feel better about carrying it, get some. It can be very helpful in emergencies. Made everything from hose clamps to tie down straps, even stabilized a broken motor mount with it once.

If it is that handy and universal in remote off road 4 wheeling, I can only imagine how handy it would come in cruising a boat in remote areas.
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Old 04-10-2012, 09:30 PM   #14
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Spare Parts

It would depend on whether your cruising is in a confined area like the California Delta where you can often limp into a marina and or get a tow, or you are going off-shore. It also depends on whether or not parts are easy to get in the area you are cruising. Minimally you should have spare V belts and hoses, the rescue tape that was talked about earlier, spare impellers and a complete change of oil and tranmission and if you have diesel engines spare filters.

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Old 04-11-2012, 06:06 AM   #15
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If the boat is a twin a set of shafts rudders and props might be in order.

Grounding is common in such thin water.

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Old 04-11-2012, 12:45 PM   #16
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Spares, spares and more spares. So many spares that you need a list to keep track of what you have and where they are stored.

Most important spares are those devoted to keeping the noisemakers running: starter, alternator, fuel pumps. Every time you replace something buy at least 2 of it and store the one you don't install.
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Old 04-12-2012, 05:49 AM   #17
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"Every time you replace something buy at least 2 of it and store the one you don't install."

A far surer way is sailor style, to install every new spare part and keep the operating item as your spare.

This way a counter person error wont be harm at the wrong time.

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Old 04-12-2012, 07:50 AM   #18
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"Every time you replace something buy at least 2 of it and store the one you don't install."

A far surer way is sailor style, to install every new spare part and keep the operating item as your spare.

This way a counter person error wont be harm at the wrong time.

FF
That's good advice. The other issue by putting the new part on is SID as Lena calls it: "sudden infant death". We have found that if a new part is going to fail during it's useful life, it seems to die within the first 30 days.
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Old 04-12-2012, 10:34 AM   #19
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A lot depends on how well the boat was maintain/checked/replaced, shake down cruises and how self sufficient you want to be. Of course you would have the basics of fluids, belts hoses, clamps, filters, impellers, pumps, tools, wire, emergency/duct tape, wire ties etc. How
the boat is maintained and service before the cruise is as important as what you might need to carry, and having several short shake down cruises would help. Then the chances are you will not need much more than the normal basics. Keeping the working items replaced as a spare is a good idea.

Before we head north to Alaska/Canada we will spend on year going though the Eagle and taking short cruise around the Puget Sound. All the fuel/water hoses will be replaced, the heat exchangers will taken off/clean/service, starters/alternator checked, new 8D batteries, what ever to eliminate as much maintenance/repair when gone. Oh, and a FAT CHECK BOOK.


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Old 04-12-2012, 12:13 PM   #20
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"Every time you replace something buy at least 2 of it and store the one you don't install."
A far surer way is sailor style, to install every new spare part and keep the operating item as your spare.
This way a counter person error wont be harm at the wrong time.
FF
We're splitting hairs now but if you buy 2 identical parts (as I advised) & install one then you'll already know whether the partsman got the right item. I agree however that when you deliberately buy a single spare it is wise to immediately install it for the reason you cited. I find though that having removed a working part that I intend to keep as a spare I usually can't resist having it rebuilt or rebuilding it myself. In the grand scheme of things the cost is insignificant & the peace of mind worthwhile.
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