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Old 05-14-2016, 06:08 PM   #1
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Mooring ball line chaffe

Recently we spent a misserably windy night on a mooring ball at Patos Island. Winds were 25-30kts.
Upon our earlier arrival in the very pleasant afternoon we passed a 3/4" three strand line through the metal ring on the ball and secured it to the port and starboard bollards. Late that evening is when the wind came up. By that time the pull on the mooring ball line was such that I could not get to the ring to pass a second line thru the ring. Fearful that the line would chaffe and separate, I spent the night in the pilot house with anchor alarms and eyes on the MFD. At first light the chaffeing was visible and significant. We pulled the line and left. Ive considered 2 lines in the future but there must be a better solution. Perhaps a hook or a length of chain mid bridle? Looking for ideas as I don't want any replays.
Thanks for ideas and suggestions.
-David
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Old 05-14-2016, 06:22 PM   #2
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What caused the chafe, ie what was the mooring line rubbing against?


I keep my boat on a mooring for the season in Essex, Ct. The rope bridle attached to the mooring line and fastened to port and stb cleats on the boat has canvas chafe guards attached to the bridle where it rubs on the anchor. So far, so good.


David
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Old 05-14-2016, 06:26 PM   #3
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The chaffe occurred as a result of friction where the line passes thru the metal ring of the mooring ball.
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Old 05-14-2016, 06:29 PM   #4
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I use two lines. Each from a cleat (one left, one right) thru the mooring eye and back to the same cleat. Eliminates sawing motion thru the eye which was likely the source of your chafe.
Cheers,
Arch
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Old 05-14-2016, 07:15 PM   #5
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I use two lines. Each from a cleat (one left, one right) thru the mooring eye and back to the same cleat. Eliminates sawing motion thru the eye which was likely the source of your chafe.
Cheers,
Arch
We've not had much of a chafe issue when using a single line passing through the ring to the opposite cleat. But in moderate to heavy winds we really dance side to side a lot. Puts a heavy strain on the line with a very loud creaking sound. Kinda unnerving at 2:30am... Did you have that problem before with a single mooring line? And if so, did the two-line system improve that any?

And with tidal switches we've occasionally had the single line twisted at the ring itself. Have you had that happen with two lines?

Thanks!
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Old 05-14-2016, 07:29 PM   #6
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In the past I have always done what Arch does, run two lines. Each runs from a bow cleat, through the ring, then back to the cleat. Never had any chafing issues. In big wind our biggest problem on the sailboat was getting the lines rigged to begin with.
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Old 05-14-2016, 07:49 PM   #7
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Two lines which is what our mooring bridle essentially has will eliminate the sawing chafe.


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Old 05-14-2016, 07:53 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arch View Post
I use two lines. Each from a cleat (one left, one right) thru the mooring eye and back to the same cleat. Eliminates sawing motion thru the eye which was likely the source of your chafe.
Cheers,
Arch
This. Taught to me by the now-owner of Northwest Explorations, at the time we were renting his 49GB Classic. Have used it ever since on dozens and dozens of nights on moorings that have a similar scheme to those found at Patos.
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Old 05-14-2016, 07:57 PM   #9
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DJ, can you describe or provide a foto please of your mooring bridle.
Thanks
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Old 05-14-2016, 07:59 PM   #10
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Commuter cruiser has a good write up and pictures. How to Tie Up to a Mooring Ball

I have learned to keep the lines short enough that they can't wrap around the bouy

No creaking noises, no chafing, and keeping the lines short helps reduce or eliminate the "dancing around".

Note, if the wind pipes up significantly, I will lengthen the lines to provide some stretch.

Hope this helps,
Arch
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Old 05-14-2016, 08:12 PM   #11
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In the PNW we dont have pennants (that I have seen) attached to the metal ring on the mooring ball. The one line looped back to port and the same to starboard approach sounds good but I was wondering if there is some type of bridle which helps accomplish this or its done with just 2 lengths of line.
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Old 05-14-2016, 08:40 PM   #12
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Did you know the wind was picking up that much from a forecast?
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Old 05-14-2016, 09:16 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by petdoc4u View Post
In the PNW we dont have pennants (that I have seen) attached to the metal ring on the mooring ball. The one line looped back to port and the same to starboard approach sounds good but I was wondering if there is some type of bridle which helps accomplish this or its done with just 2 lengths of line.
The PO of my boat has a large stainless hook that he used to attach to the rings on mooring balls. He used just a single line. You could use a shackle and two lines to create a bridle.
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Old 05-14-2016, 10:00 PM   #14
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You could always shackle a pennant to the ring. Of course, using a shackle is a bit more difficult, but it is a lot more secure. On my personal mooring the pennant is shackled to the mooring chain below the mooring ball. I use a 7/8" double braid pennant for my 36' boat.
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Old 05-14-2016, 10:41 PM   #15
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May be a bit of a noob idea, but I purchased a roll of 1050 denier ballistic nylon fabric (the stuff they make luggage out of) and have wrapped all of my dock lines in it. I made simple sleeves on a sewing machine and pulled the line through it. The sleeves take all the wear, protecting the lines. Cost was less than $50 for the roll. Two yards did all 4 of my dock lines with a ton left over.

https://www.onlinefabricstore.net/bl...on-fabric-.htm

Couldn't you do the same thing for the mooring ball line(s)?
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Old 05-14-2016, 11:13 PM   #16
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He was having chafe where the line passed through the ring on the mooring ball. This was a temporary mooring ball, not his home moorage.
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Old 05-14-2016, 11:17 PM   #17
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Understand that; I was thinking about putting the sleeve on the line that he would pass through the eye of the ball, making a bridle that would go from the port cleat, through the eye of the ball, and then on to the starboard cleat
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Old 05-14-2016, 11:25 PM   #18
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Understand that; I was thinking about putting the sleeve on the line that he would pass through the eye of the ball, making a bridle that would go from the port cleat, through the eye of the ball, and then on to the starboard cleat
Got it, sorry. Yeah that would work.

I am interested in the fabric you used. Chafe guards could be easy to make with that. Do you recall what thread you used with that?
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Old 05-14-2016, 11:28 PM   #19
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Got it, sorry. Yeah that would work.

I am interested in the fabric you used. Chafe guards could be easy to make with that. Do you recall what thread you used with that?
Yes, here's the link to the thread:

https://www.onlinefabricstore.net/hs...yword=S964-900

Zig-zag stitched it 2-3x, and then used a butane torch to cauterize the edges so there wouldn't be any fraying.
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Old 05-15-2016, 06:54 AM   #20
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In most cases the eye on the top of a mooring ball is not strong enough to pass the boat loading to the mooring chain.

Many moorings will have a heavy line with a light pick up line and buoy attached to the mooring chain..

This is great!

Those that do not will usually require a dink ride to pass a line to the top of the mooring chain..

The hassle is in the AM, another dink ride is required to let go.

In very calm water this is fine , otherwise a big PIA.
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