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Old 07-25-2016, 10:02 AM   #1
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Since Canada's military might is only a skiff and a balloon better than Iceland, I have zero military exposure and don't know the difference between a frigate and an f bomb. That doesn't however, stop me from being fascinated with the hardware and entertained by the personnel.

Periodic reference is made here to past service, like Northern Spy being an "A-Ganger." Whatever that is, it sounds interesting, maybe even illegal.

So, I wonder a couple of things; how many of you transitioned from navy to recreational boating? With seemingly lots of pilots on board, how many moved from AF to private or commercial and one step further, from pilot to skipper?

I also imagine many of you, because of your military lives, have come within a few hours, days or miles of each other in the past without knowing it.
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Old 07-25-2016, 11:16 AM   #2
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I grew up on boats in the PNW, then went into the Navy to see the World, and ended up spending the last 16 years of my service on Whidbey Is., so once on a boat always on a boat. Now that I'm retired we are looking for a boat to live-aboard.
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Old 07-25-2016, 11:37 AM   #3
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Since Canada's military might is only a skiff and a balloon better than Iceland, I have zero military exposure and don't know the difference between a frigate and an f bomb. That doesn't however, stop me from being fascinated with the hardware and entertained by the personnel.

Periodic reference is made here to past service, like Northern Spy being an "A-Ganger." Whatever that is, it sounds interesting, maybe even illegal.

So, I wonder a couple of things; how many of you transitioned from navy to recreational boating? With seemingly lots of pilots on board, how many moved from AF to private or commercial and one step further, from pilot to skipper?

I also imagine many of you, because of your military lives, have come within a few hours, days or miles of each other in the past without knowing it.
A gang would be Auxiliary's Division, they would be tasked with maintenance and repair of equipment in spaces that were not main propulsion. Kind of a thankless task in that they tend to "own" gear all over the place which is often related to others gear, sea water cooling for instance that might used in a chill water system for electronics. That breaks the "twidgets", electronics types, would blame them for their equipment being down. They would also own things like the refrigeration units, steering, possibly arresting gear that sort of stuff. Combined with electrical who owned the entire power distribution and generation gear made for some very over-tasked folks.

To compensate for the said over tasking, liberty ports tended to be, uhmmm....colorful? A gang often taking a lead in whatever the entertainment Du-joure happened to entail. Some of which may not have met local, or really any requirements for sanitation, decency, or even self-respect depending on the time and the port involved. Submariners holding the absolute pinnacle of that lofty task.

It is a hard earned reputation that would likely amaze many with some of the shenanigans.
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Old 07-25-2016, 11:39 AM   #4
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Wifey B: Great Question. Hope you don't mind but I decided to also incorporate it into a poll. Once again, I stole someone else's brilliant idea.

I'm not a military anything. I really don't think they'd want me because I'm not good at taking orders......
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Old 07-25-2016, 11:45 AM   #5
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Following orders is important, but the US military has been noted superior in many instances because of the emphasis is really independent thinking through the ranks.

Historically that was a punishable offense in many militaries.

At least that was my experiences with the superior leadership I encountered and the reference materials I used in my career.
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Old 07-25-2016, 12:05 PM   #6
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Following orders is important, but the US military has been noted superior in many instances because of the emphasis is really independent thinking through the ranks.

Historically that was a punishable offense in many militaries.

At least that was my experiences with the superior leadership I encountered and the reference materials I used in my career.
Wifey B: And having to wear those uniforms? And get all muddy and dirty? I'm great with allowing girls in the military, just this girl wasn't cut out for it.

I am sure I could have done it. Just never did. As a 16 year old trying to make it on my own, it might have been a good route to go. Just not one I ever considered.
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Old 07-25-2016, 12:11 PM   #7
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Muddy and dirty?

The least of a serviceperson's worries.....

It usually no TP when you need it....
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Old 07-25-2016, 12:35 PM   #8
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For the survey I was in the US Army for 27 years. I was an artillery officer and also a fixed wing and helicopter pilot. (The how and why the Army utilized it's commissioned officer pilots back in my day is a long story that I'll skip.)

I was taught to sail in Pensacola Florida by my dad, who as a young man had sailed on commercial gaff rigged schooners. The love never left me and if I happened to be stationed near water I had a sail boat. After retiring from the Army and into my second career I began long distance sailing making several trips to and from Bermuda and down to the Caribbean and back. Now, due to a combination of age and some health issues I am a trawler guy with a Monk 36. I hope I can stay on the water until the bitter end.

By the way for the sake of trivia, the US Army has only about 100 fewer aircraft than the US Air Force, thus being the second largest "air force" in the world. It has the largest flight school in the world as it not only trains all US Army pilots, but also the US Air Force helicopter pilots and the pilots of many foreign nations where it is cheaper to pay the Army to train their pilots rather than operate their own flight school. And up until the mid 1970's it had more boats and ships than the US Navy. It still has a lot of boats and small ships but not near as many as a few decades ago.
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Old 07-25-2016, 01:03 PM   #9
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Muddy and dirty?

The least of a serviceperson's worries.....

It usually no TP when you need it....
Wifey B: That's....um....crappy....euphemism r me. The fact I've never camped out even makes me an unlikely candidate. Well we did spend the night on the beach one time.
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Old 07-25-2016, 01:36 PM   #10
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Following orders is important, but the US military has been noted superior in many instances because of the emphasis is really independent thinking through the ranks.

Historically that was a punishable offense in many militaries.

At least that was my experiences with the superior leadership I encountered and the reference materials I used in my career.
Thank you.
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Old 07-25-2016, 02:31 PM   #11
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Thank you.
probably why so many vets come out and do well for themselves.

One problem today though is independent thinking needs to be nurtured.

Mistakes have to be taken in stride and improved upon.

This is no longer tolerable in today's overly scrutinized and politically driven military.

Mistakes are career enders so better to be a woodworker than a standout.
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Old 07-25-2016, 02:45 PM   #12
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Sailor at 13 ,offshore voyager at 18, US Navy pilot at 22, Airline later, then over to the DARK SIDE.
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Old 07-25-2016, 02:50 PM   #13
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probably why so many vets come out and do well for themselves.

One problem today though is independent thinking needs to be nurtured.

Mistakes have to be taken in stride and improved upon.

This is no longer tolerable in today's overly scrutinized and politically driven military.

Mistakes are career enders so better to be a woodworker than a standout.
True in the business world too. I've heard of people telling one who works for them, "one more mistake and I'll have to fire you." Well, fire them now, because they'll make another mistake sometime. Zero tolerance is impossible to maintain. We sometimes discourage people from taking charge and making decisions. We stifle creativity, free thinking, enginuity. We make mediocre more acceptable. We end up if we do so with all followers and no leaders and with all learning stopped. People try to fly under the radar to avoid being made the target.

I don't know how it is or was in the military. I do know that I was fortunate enough to work in an environment where I was given tremendous latitude, given responsibility, but the freedom and authority to do things. Similarly, I learned to give that to others and allow them to excel. My success as in any endeavor is attributable to those who worked for me. My primary job was to put them in position to succeed. They were all given voices and listened to. Many brains in use are always better than one.
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Old 07-25-2016, 02:51 PM   #14
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I spent 8 years in the USNR in order to pay back Uncle Sam for my college. Quite a few of my classmates went active duty. In retrospect, I wish I would have as well. The experience instilled values, and a lot of good life lessons were learned. Visiting 3rd world, impoverished countries as a young man on ships made me realize how fortunate we are to live in a country where opportunity is there if you work for it.

But my love of boats started much earlier than that when I was scrubbing fishing boats at the age of 12 in order to go fishing for free.
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Old 07-25-2016, 02:57 PM   #15
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Following orders is important, but the US military has been noted superior in many instances because of the emphasis is really independent thinking through the ranks.

Historically that was a punishable offense in many militaries.

At least that was my experiences with the superior leadership I encountered and the reference materials I used in my career.

Yep, my experience too...

-Chris
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Old 07-25-2016, 03:09 PM   #16
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Hawg-Why don't you guys elect Trump? He'll make your military great again!

Paul-my Dad was a USMC artillery officer, even though a USNA grad. I spent my first grade year at the USA artillery school at Fort Sill, OK. Even at age 6, it was a hellhole.

As noted in Wifey B's thread, I was USMC, back seat in F4Js (not a pilot, RIO, radar intercept officer.)

Learned to sail while Dad was an instructor as the USNA in the mid-50's.
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Old 07-25-2016, 03:26 PM   #17
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True in the business world too. I've heard of people telling one who works for them, "one more mistake and I'll have to fire you." Well, fire them now, because they'll make another mistake sometime. Zero tolerance is impossible to maintain. We sometimes discourage people from taking charge and making decisions. We stifle creativity, free thinking, enginuity. We make mediocre more acceptable. We end up if we do so with all followers and no leaders and with all learning stopped. People try to fly under the radar to avoid being made the target.



I don't know how it is or was in the military. I do know that I was fortunate enough to work in an environment where I was given tremendous latitude, given responsibility, but the freedom and authority to do things. Similarly, I learned to give that to others and allow them to excel. My success as in any endeavor is attributable to those who worked for me. My primary job was to put them in position to succeed. They were all given voices and listened to. Many brains in use are always better than one.

I like your style.
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Old 07-25-2016, 03:38 PM   #18
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Good leadership is good leadership no matter where.

And it smells and feels like the air after a spring shower. You don't feel like you NEED a shower.
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Old 07-25-2016, 03:46 PM   #19
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THD - I went to the Field Artillery Advanced Course in 1970. We had a number of Marine artillery officers in the course. All were good guys. Occasionally there were "dust-ups" between the Army and Marines in "Fidler's Green" the wild bar of the officer's club. They always ended up with each buying beer for the other. You are right about Fort Sill being a "Hell Hole".

Paul
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Old 07-25-2016, 04:20 PM   #20
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Good leadership is good leadership no matter where.

And it smells and feels like the air after a spring shower. You don't feel like you NEED a shower.
I'm sure all of us have at some time in our lives encountered people who made us immediately feel like we didn't just need a shower, but needed hosing off and decontamination. I was lucky to always have the option to not deal with those people.
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