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Old 09-11-2016, 09:35 AM   #221
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Keeping up on the posts in this thread, which I do upon occasion, is like listening to some of the best advice on TF for staying alive aboard, near/off, or even walking some distance around the water toward our boats.

Would be great if most (if not all) boats had easily accessible means of re-boarding so that anyone who may fall into water could utilize that location for getting back out of the water.

Alas... most boats don't have such re-boarding easy access equipment that is instantly available. Ours included; when we are away from boat, that is. When at boat, we have nifty re-boarding capabilities (utilizing our custom made 6' long stainless swim ladder that hinges onto swim platform with thick knotted pull rope coming off transom top for help in climbing back aboard) that we put into place for duration of time using the boat. That said - If we fell over between dock and boat before setting up our re-board system (which takes a couple minutes)... we may be in trouble. And, while we're not there our secured system would be of little use to others.

Soooo... Thanks to this thread regarding all boaters maybe needing some sort of easy re-board capabilities, and the fact that Linda and I are not getting any younger, I'm going to rethink and redesign re-boarding safety equipment on our Tollycraft. I hope to make it easy to use, always available to use, and usably understandable by any person who may fall into the water and become in need.

I'd be honored to have any person in emergency situation[s] to use our boat's equipment to get back out of the water!

This thread saves lives - I'm confident in that statement. Will let you know what I come up with - by photos after items are completed... may take a while before all is in place.

Happy Boater-Life-Saving Daze! - Art
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Old 09-11-2016, 10:16 AM   #222
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@ Art Your comment awakened me to my waddle around the harbor last weekend. I was observing the boats at anchor. Almost to a T there were NO deployed ladders, and I don't recall seeing a 'pull down line' on any of them. Almost universally the boats that had a ladder that was usable were swim platform mounted 2 or 3 step ladders which were yankable while in the water (if you knew they were there).

Me thinks I am going to find a swim platform ladder to permanently mount.

Even my 4 step WM model is a @#$%^&* to climb out on even when intentionally going swimming. Time to re think the boarding process. As you said: we aren't getting younger!

Anyone have the 'inflatable' ladder on their dink?
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Old 09-11-2016, 07:31 PM   #223
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Thanks to Kitty for sharing the experience with stark honesty. It has been my contention that many types of vessels, the Manatee among them, are really difficult to recover MOB's. I'm just under 250 lbs. and a narrow step ladder, in addition to being a real torture on the feet, has little to grasp with your hands and is typically too fragile to depend on any degree of positive climbing angle. I keep rethinking the boarding ladder idea over and over, but there's no substitute for thick tubed, wide-step dock style ladder extending at an angle outward toward the MOB so one can actually lean one's weight forward while climbing the ladder. Four steps instead of two or three would no-doubt, be even better. In the case of helping someone up the ladder, one can actually assist by pulling toward the boat instead of trying to lift straight up.

Attached is a photo of my SS side ladder, which was the only way to get back aboard the boat when I bought it. Nice looking, no? Climbing that ladder to get back aboard was a torture for anyone who did it. Thankfully, we never needed it for an emergency, but I can't imagine the guy that Kitty was talking about being able to use it.

The second photo is of what I should have attached to my swim platform. An unapologetically blatant life saving tool, standard equipment on Great Harbour Trawlers.
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Old 09-11-2016, 07:59 PM   #224
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Originally Posted by healhustler View Post
Thanks to Kitty for sharing the experience with stark honesty. It has been my contention that many types of vessels, the Manatee among them, are really difficult to recover MOB's. I'm just under 250 lbs. and a narrow step ladder, in addition to being a real torture on the feet, has little to grasp with your hands and is typically too fragile to depend on any degree of positive climbing angle. I keep rethinking the boarding ladder idea over and over, but there's no substitute for thick tubed, wide-step dock style ladder extending at an angle outward toward the MOB so one can actually lean one's weight forward while climbing the ladder. Four steps instead of two or three would no-doubt, be even better. In the case of helping someone up the ladder, one can actually assist by pulling toward the boat instead of trying to lift straight up.

Attached is a photo of my SS side ladder, which was the only way to get back aboard the boat when I bought it. Nice looking, no? Climbing that ladder to get back aboard was a torture for anyone who did it. Thankfully, we never needed it for an emergency, but I can't imagine the guy that Kitty was talking about being able to use it.

The second photo is of what I should have attached to my swim platform. An unapologetically blatant life saving tool, standard equipment on Great Harbour Trawlers.
The person in the water has to unlash that thing?
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Old 09-11-2016, 09:27 PM   #225
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The person in the water has to unlash that thing?
That one, in particular, is on an N-47 that was parked behind me in a Marina in Stuart, FL for about a year. The owner preferred that method, claiming that from the water, he could reach the rope easier than the ladder's original catch. When the ladder swings down on it's axis, I suppose it was a good idea to be on the side of the ladder rather than under it.
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Old 09-12-2016, 03:56 AM   #226
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I wonder if you see a shark would that give you an energy boost to get back in?
Yes, probably, especially if at the same time I heard the sound of doom-doom doom-doom doom-doom...

'Jaws' ruined sea bathing for me anyway. I'm just very careful not to fall in...
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Old 09-12-2016, 06:32 AM   #227
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Originally Posted by healhustler View Post
That one, in particular, is on an N-47 that was parked behind me in a Marina in Stuart, FL for about a year. The owner preferred that method, claiming that from the water, he could reach the rope easier than the ladder's original catch. When the ladder swings down on it's axis, I suppose it was a good idea to be on the side of the ladder rather than under it.
Always hard to tell from pix, but it seems like velcro straps as an example would be quicker. I really like the feature of the extended handles above the platform, though I wonder how that center positioning affects getting on and off a dinghy (which in the right spot those handles would be additionally handy).
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Old 09-12-2016, 06:36 AM   #228
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Always hard to tell from pix, but it seems like velcro straps as an example would be quicker. I really like the feature of the extended handles above the platform, though I wonder how that center positioning affects getting on and off a dinghy (which in the right spot those handles would be additionally handy).
Then I couldn't use the platform to haul the dingy on..... Always a trade off. Guess I may have to upgrade to a larger swim platform.

Velcro. Awesome idea. Leave a pull down line hanging just above the surface and use Velcro. Good idea.
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Old 09-12-2016, 06:46 AM   #229
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Or could you tie the rope with a slip knot and just grab the end and yank?
I still like the simple idea of a loop of rope setting on the platform, just pull it down into the water and step into the loop and stand up to climb on. Not elegant but simple and works.
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Old 09-12-2016, 07:11 AM   #230
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Velcro - Yeah... that's the ticket... maybe!


Stainless broom handle clamp[s] fastened in correct place/position could be longer lasting and so much more pleasant to look at, yet maybe obtrusive for hands, arms, shoulders when ladder is in released position.
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Old 09-12-2016, 07:18 AM   #231
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Hummm - Could this baby be set up correctly for easy/fast deployment while in water???

https://jet.com/product/Master-Equip...721eaabacc919c
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