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Old 01-27-2013, 09:36 AM   #41
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Rwidman,as Capn Chuck effectively says, the answer is non responsive to the question. Perhaps they think it already happened, their response was bad, and they are getting set up.
What did you think? Were you comforted? Does it worry you they did not fully address the question? How about going back and asking them to answer the question?
Is Boat US franchised, as Seatow is in Australia? Different local operators may have different ideas.
I still think human decency side of any assistance service would kick in for an emergency(the exact nature of which can`t be predicted) and you and Mrs R would be looked after. Is that too trusting?
Absolutely or medical issues would all be free at the hospital too....

There are situations that often wind up where good hearts take care of almost everything...but counting on that part of human nature might let you down when you really need it. Having a few thousand extra in the emergency column in the cruising kitty is smart...just for those time when towing insurance and good hearts turn black.
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Old 01-27-2013, 02:05 PM   #42
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If it was a routine tow, BoatU.S. would pay for it under your BoatU.S. Membership. It could be a salvage in which case your hull insurance would pay for it.


Folks, I don't find their answer to be "non-responsive". I asked a question, they answered it. If the boat was still where I anchored it and all they had to do was bring up the anchor and tow it to a dock or marina, that would be a "routine tow". If my boat had broken loose and drifted onto a beach or rocks, that would probably be "salvage".

It's unrealistic to expect more from someone sitting in an office speculating about an incident that hasn't happened yet.

Frankly, I am a bit puzzled that so few boaters and especially cruisers who are often far from home haven't given the possibility of being incapacitated while cruising some serious thought.
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Old 01-27-2013, 02:52 PM   #43
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...Frankly, I am a bit puzzled that so few boaters and especially cruisers who are often far from home haven't given the possibility of being incapacitated while cruising some serious thought...
Lena and I have given it some thought. It's part of cruising. What do you do when you're 12 days from the nearest land? The best you can, short of activating the EPIRB, we are on our own. We have a medical library, med kit with sutures, ringers solution plus a better stocked pharmacy than some drug stores. We have taken medical classes and have practiced, on each other, inserting an IV.

I worry about a medical emergency about as much as our single engine dying which isn't very much.
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Old 01-27-2013, 03:17 PM   #44
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Lena and I have given it some thought. It's part of cruising. What do you do when you're 12 days from the nearest land? The best you can, short of activating the EPIRB, we are on our own. We have a medical library, med kit with sutures, ringers solution plus a better stocked pharmacy than some drug stores. We have taken medical classes and have practiced, on each other, inserting an IV.

I worry about a medical emergency about as much as our single engine dying which isn't very much.
When we did a 14 day offshore passage on the sailboat, I first took a wilderness first aid course through NOLS to have some idea of how to deal with things "on my own" and we had a very extensive first aid kit that included sutures and morphine. No practice with IVs though. :Eek: My biggest concern was someone being seriously injured but luckily nothing happened. I don't think we even needed a band aid. But it never hurts to be prepared.

I think if we had to leave our boat anchored somewhere I'd call for a tow and hope for the best. Hopefully the non injured / non incapacitated person would be able to figure out the coordinates to give to the tow boat captain. Personally, I'd be able to get my boat to a dock by myself (might not be pretty) but if I had the option I'd rather go with my husband to the hospital. Actually, I say I could get my boat back, but if my husband had just been medievaced off our boat I'd probably be too freaked out to do anything! Which brings me back to the tow boat???

Ron I'm glad you've come out of your prior incidents ok.
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Old 01-27-2013, 05:44 PM   #45
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Folks, I don't find their answer to be "non-responsive". I asked a question, they answered it. If the boat was still where I anchored it and all they had to do was bring up the anchor and tow it to a dock or marina, that would be a "routine tow". If my boat had broken loose and drifted onto a beach or rocks, that would probably be "salvage".

It's unrealistic to expect more from someone sitting in an office speculating about an incident that hasn't happened yet.

Frankly, I am a bit puzzled that so few boaters and especially cruisers who are often far from home haven't given the possibility of being incapacitated while cruising some serious thought.
I'll pretty much guarantee that it's NOT a routine tow....the BOAT IS NOT DISABLED, not in need or fuel, a jum, ungrounding, parts, entangled prop, etc...etc...

Call your local franchise guy and see what he/she says and ask if they think ANY franchise owner would do it for free.

I'm pretty sure mine wouldn't.
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Old 01-27-2013, 05:54 PM   #46
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If there's nobody on board, it's abandoned. I think that would make it subject to salvage.
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Old 01-27-2013, 06:48 PM   #47
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If there's nobody on board, it's abandoned. I think that would make it subject to salvage.
Following that logic, anyone who anchors their boat and takes a dinghy to shore has "abandoned" their boat. Same for leaving a boat on a mooring ball.
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Old 01-27-2013, 06:56 PM   #48
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If there's nobody on board, it's abandoned. I think that would make it subject to salvage.
Not true at all...the owner has to declare "abandonment" and that is good for up to a year or more based on salvage law..

The ony weay salvage would kick in is if the "salvor" could prove he/she was protecting the vessel from imminent danger.
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Old 01-27-2013, 11:27 PM   #49
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Agreed short term. So what happens if a boat is anchored and left for a year or more, but the owner doesn't declare it abandoned? What about if it's afloat and washes up somewhere?
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Old 01-28-2013, 06:58 AM   #50
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Agreed short term. So what happens if a boat is anchored and left for a year or more, but the owner doesn't declare it abandoned? What about if it's afloat and washes up somewhere?
I wouldn't leave it there that long even if I was dead. If I couldn't do it myself, I would arrange to have it returned home.
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Old 01-28-2013, 07:34 AM   #51
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Agreed short term. So what happens if a boat is anchored and left for a year or more, but the owner doesn't declare it abandoned? What about if it's afloat and washes up somewhere?
It would be a matter for a maritime salvage claim in court.

Here's a partial definition of abandonment...salvage gets really complcated in certain ways and after decades of reading about it (like most law...I keep picking up tidbit hee and there)...

"Authorized abandonment refers to a condition wherein, at the time the Master decided to abandon ship, there was no hope or intention of returning to the stricken ship. There can be no suggestion that a mere temporary abandonment would dissolve the crew's contract of employment. "
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