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Old 11-24-2009, 07:53 AM   #1
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Marine head, whats legal

I just read on a cruisers web site that several counties on the east coast of FL have been ticketing boaters for not properly securing the Y valve on the head. So that got me to wondering. The Y valve is not secured in the holding tank position on my sailboat but I can lock the thru hull valve in the closed position.
Does anyone know if this would pass an inspection? I don't think there is anyway to lock the y valve.

Tim
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Old 11-24-2009, 08:07 AM   #2
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RE: Marine head, whats legal

The thru hull is what is required in almost all regulations to be locked, and not the Y valve although some will accept that. But if the thru hull is locked down or the handle is removed you will have no issues with any authority. Chuck
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Old 11-24-2009, 09:48 AM   #3
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Marine head, whats legal

The "Y" valve must be in the closed/locked position. The through hull can be "too easily" (intentionally sabotaged) not working. So said the CG on my inspection this summer.

-- Edited by sunchaser on Tuesday 24th of November 2009 10:49:21 AM
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Old 11-24-2009, 11:01 AM   #4
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Marine head, whats legal

If you read the federal regulations it states the discharge valve. State by state the regulations will be different but if the lock is on the thru hull OR the handle removed you will not have an issue with non compliance from state or federal and of course the Y valve will be set to redirect to the holding tank. If you set the Y valve overboard with the thru hull locked closed you will have some issues but not with the authorities. With the thru hull locked and the Y valve set properly we have never had state or federal agency ask for both to be locked or the lock moved from the thru hull to the Y valve. And what could one possibly do to the thru hull that can't be done to the Y valve? Chuck


-- Edited by Capn Chuck on Tuesday 24th of November 2009 12:02:10 PM
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Old 11-24-2009, 11:24 AM   #5
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RE: Marine head, whats legal

Chuck - Why not avoid all the fuss and use the Y valve for its intended purpose?* That way there is no hassle with any state, county*or federal guys
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Old 11-24-2009, 02:17 PM   #6
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RE: Marine head, whats legal

I had a voluntary Coast Guard inspection this summer, my Y valve was directed to the holding tank and secured with a zip tied. The CG examiner said that was fine, he never asked about the thru hull.
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Old 11-24-2009, 05:31 PM   #7
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RE: Marine head, whats legal

I simply tried to answer the original posters question.
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Old 11-25-2009, 04:18 AM   #8
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RE: Marine head, whats legal

OK folks, thanks for all the replies.
I have a survey scheduled this morning for my sailboat and if successful I will be boatless.
I'm going down to the boat an hour early to secure the thru hull so there will be no issues with that.

My next issue is what to do about a boat. I will soon be (in a couple of years) a retired pensionless airline pilot and want badly to get a trawler or motor cruiser. My biggest concern in acquiring another boat is the cost to slip her. Here in SW FL, the going rate is about $10 to $12 a foot. That's just too much, so I'm on the look out for an alternative. Any ideas?

The much more fun question is what kind of boat will suit my need. Here's what I think I'm looking for.

Price, the most important question: Below $50000. In my experience and depending on the motivation of the seller, I'm looking at boats advertised below $75,000.

Diesel. No compromise.

Single Engine for economy of use (mpg) and economy of maintenance. With my plan to stick
with intercoastal cruising, the safety of another engine is not as important. After much thought I've made my mind up on this issue. I think.

NO TEAK. In Florida the sun eats teak like Floridians eat grouper. I spend 3 days a year attending to the teak on my sailboat. It looks good and is probably why she sold as soon as she did (4 months). But NEVER AGAIN.

Probably a sedan. My wife wants a boat that's easy to get on and off from a dingy. We have a large dog and that's the main reason.

Fully depreciated. The price range that I'm looking at will probably ensure that it's fully depreciated. However, I thought my sailboat was fully depreciated and I sold her for 32% less than I bought her for after 6 years. But like someone once said, "It's the economy, stupid".

A boat that will be easy to sell when the time comes. That eliminates the specialty boats and those that were fishing boats turned into nice trawlers.

There are a lot of boats for sale here in the southeast, but not many that meet these requirements. Most are dual engine and many are gas powered. But I've got my eye on one boat that nicely fits all of my needs, the Mainship 34, built in the early to mid 80's. A boat that's economic to buy and operate, no teak and single engine. The only down side is the ladder to the fly bridge instead of stairs, but at my price range beggars can't be choosers.

But before I go looking for a replacement boat I've got to get through this survey and I've got to resolve the slip cost issue. Stay tuned for the survey results.

Tim
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Old 11-25-2009, 04:45 AM   #9
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RE: Marine head, whats legal

Here in SW FL, the going rate is about $10 to $12 a foot. That's just too much, so I'm on the look out for an alternative. Any ideas?

Sounds like you too drove for the Friendly Skys.


Look in the FL Mariner , there are loaDS OF BOATS IN THE $25k price range , usually that simply need LOVE!

Cosmetic Perfection will not be achieved with a lifetimes work, but function , run the loop, go to the Bahamas , cruise Maine is usually only a bit of work.

Fiberglassing (rebuilding a "composit plywood deck) is only somre uguly grunt work, little in skills.

An hour with anyone familar with std glass lamination will make you as educated as the origional workers.

Bad fuel tank> forgetabout it > chop a hole , insert a bladder and GO!

A 75W solar cell and charge controller will allow you to keep your pride and joy on a mooring .

Another alt is behind a home , here in Ortona its $50 a week , $100 for liveaboard , if you can find a spot.

The decision is is the boat a tool , for going places ??

or a showpiece to display your appreciation of an interior of exotic wood to the world?

Simply GOING is cheap and fun, but you gotta prefer paint to unobtanium

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Old 11-25-2009, 04:53 AM   #10
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RE: Marine head, whats legal

In CanaDA running the loop the overboard system must be made "inoperable".

Our method was as easy as can be done.

The head empties to a holding tank.

The holding tank connects to a Y fitting , which is mounted to the deck pump out plate.

The other leg of the Y is connected to a discharge pump, and the discharge sea cock.

Simply removing (and as captain locking in a drawer) the PLUG from the deck plate makes it impossible to discharge , except at the pumpout station.

simple,

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Old 11-25-2009, 09:34 AM   #11
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RE: Marine head, whats legal

Just to clarify, Here are the CFR regs. Chuck

33cfr159.7
".......the operator must secure each ...... device in a manner which
prevents
discharge of treated or untreated sewage. Acceptable methods of securing the
device include--
(1) Closing the seacock and removing the handle;
(2) Padlocking the seacock in the closed position;
(3) Using a non-releasable wire-tie to hold the seacock in
the closed position; or
(4) Locking the door to the space enclosing the toilets with
a padlock or door handle key lock."
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