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Old 12-07-2012, 11:58 PM   #1
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"manyboats" Eric's curiosity

A couple weeks ago, Eric expressed curiosity of a motorboat partially caught in one of my photos. Don't have any additional information to provide except for these photos taken today:







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Old 12-08-2012, 06:57 AM   #2
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NICE , looks like good speed with low fuel bills from the narrow hull.
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Old 12-08-2012, 07:03 AM   #3
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if that's an additional bilge pump hose sticking out the port in the bottom photo...that's EXACTLY why I love looking at but not owning a woodie.
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Old 12-08-2012, 11:41 AM   #4
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What a graceful lady Mark. She looks to be in quite nice shape too. If the hull were good and she had a "for sale" sign on her I may be quite vulnerable.

psneeld,
When FG boats first started up I thought boats like this would become popular in FG but it never happened. Boats w plywood boat lines continued to dominate the boating world. Probably because the hard chine is so much better at higher speeds. I was think'in in terms of how much more difficult a boat like this was to build but perhaps a good boatbuilder could build this soft chine girl just about as easily as a hard chine.

Thank you Mark.
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Old 12-08-2012, 04:13 PM   #5
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Looks like an ELCO
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Old 12-08-2012, 04:36 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
A couple weeks ago, Eric expressed curiosity of a motorboat partially caught in one of my photos. Don't have any additional information to provide except for these photos taken today:








looks like a converted rum runner
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Old 12-08-2012, 04:41 PM   #7
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What a graceful lady Mark. She looks to be in quite nice shape too. If the hull were good and she had a "for sale" sign on her I may be quite vulnerable.

psneeld,
When FG boats first started up I thought boats like this would become popular in FG but it never happened. Boats w plywood boat lines continued to dominate the boating world. Probably because the hard chine is so much better at higher speeds. I was think'in in terms of how much more difficult a boat like this was to build but perhaps a good boatbuilder could build this soft chine girl just about as easily as a hard chine.

Thank you Mark.
I have never liked the way the side and bottom was mated on the plywood boats but the comment above made me think of an easy way to mate them with a high degree of structuraql integrity.
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Old 12-09-2012, 02:23 AM   #8
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She's had better days. Lots of deferred maintenance wasn't caught by the photographs.
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Old 12-09-2012, 05:11 AM   #9
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Nice looking old boat, Monk or Grandy?
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Old 12-09-2012, 11:55 AM   #10
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Floyd wrote

"I have never liked the way the side and bottom was mated on the plywood boats"

I'm bewildered. Every way I've ever seen the chine joint it has been excellent. Or at least I assumed so. If a chine log was too small or of an undesirable species of wood that would be undesirable indeed but I guess I've always assumed the boats were designed by someone knowing more about and enough about the matter to get it right. And now we have stitch and glue. Therein lies probable great strength to weight but there may be other unseen potential problems w such a joint. Does the above make me an optimist? Or a blind optimist? I question lots of things but obviously not everything.

Actually I've thought of a way not to like the chine joints on plywood boats .... hard to repair.
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Old 12-09-2012, 07:56 PM   #11
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Floyd wrote

"I have never liked the way the side and bottom was mated on the plywood boats"

I'm bewildered. Every way I've ever seen the chine joint it has been excellent. Or at least I assumed so. If a chine log was too small or of an undesirable species of wood that would be undesirable indeed but I guess I've always assumed the boats were designed by someone knowing more about and enough about the matter to get it right. And now we have stitch and glue. Therein lies probable great strength to weight but there may be other unseen potential problems w such a joint. Does the above make me an optimist? Or a blind optimist? I question lots of things but obviously not everything.

Actually I've thought of a way not to like the chine joints on plywood boats .... hard to repair.

well my comment was a result of my feeling that they did not have the structural integrity that i would like. That said they have proven to be very strong, however, if i was to build one i was use technology that has been abandoned for the most part since about 1900
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Old 12-09-2012, 08:07 PM   #12
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plywood boats

I am a bit of a romantic re. older boats BUT a couple of weeks ago I watched a good sized plywood sailboat sink off Turn Point after hitting a submerged log..... lucky the operator was plucked off before he went into the COLD water .......... same thing could happen to fiberglass but not as likely .. steel - no way!!!!!!! ------ stay dry!! jp
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Old 12-09-2012, 08:31 PM   #13
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I am a bit of a romantic re. older boats BUT a couple of weeks ago I watched a good sized plywood sailboat sink off Turn Point after hitting a submerged log..... lucky the operator was plucked off before he went into the COLD water .......... same thing could happen to fiberglass but not as likely .. steel - no way!!!!!!! ------ stay dry!! jp
wasnt the size and shape of the log in comparison to the size and design of the sailboat a determining factor in its demise. And wouldnt the same numbers yeld the same result for a steel hull? wooden glass hulls tend to be more boyant than steel so while they may be damaged eaiser than steel they are not as likely to go down like a rock if holed.

just speculating here. What does everyone think? When a kid I sank two small craft of 18-20 feet one of wood and one of glass. The woody stayed afloat filled with water and the glass one sank like a rock. The glass boat was loaded with a big block tricked out chevy and the wooden rockholt had a 25hp outboard....i guess my point is aint there lots of factors that determine a vessels ability to survive trama? Steel does have advantages but then so does aluminum, glass or wood
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