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Old 12-02-2012, 09:34 PM   #41
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Most boats lie beam to the seas when you go dead in the water. When attempting a pickup...usually the center of the swim platform isn't all that bad as compared to the side. Most trawlers will be rolling badly and much more likely to whack someone if you are picking up to leeward and may drift over them.
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Old 12-03-2012, 01:08 PM   #42
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Very good point. The stern of a rolling boat would be the axis and pretty stable Another place to attach the hoist.
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Old 12-03-2012, 01:21 PM   #43
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If I have my wits about me, ....
And therein lies the problem. From everything I've read, been told, and learned in class, most people who go into the water unexpectedly don't have anything resembling a wit about them. And the colder the water, the more helpless a person immediately is. Someone who goes over in the Gulf or Southern California may have a good chance of having the presence of mind to use a radio. I bet if I threw someone in the water up here when they were least expecting it, even if they had a VHF attached to their belt, 99 percent of them would not use it.

From what I have heard of boating accidents in Lake Washington, the people who fall or are thrown in by the boat's action don't even call for help. They just disappear.

Witness OFB's experience in his marina. The person he was pulling out of the water could not even speak while he was doing it.

If you want to alert people on board that you've gone over the only sure way that I can think of is to wear a transmitter that automatically begins broadcasting when immersed in water to a receiver on the boat. I have not looked into anything like this but I've got to believe they exist.
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Old 12-03-2012, 01:45 PM   #44
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there were (probably still are) some nifty MOB systems to alert the boat and even home in on for a limited range...but a PLB isn't that type of device...not self activating and needs to be held above the water vertically.
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Old 12-03-2012, 01:49 PM   #45
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There are MOB devices that will shut down the engine if you go in the water. Marketed mostly to people who fish alone in smaller boats or offshore. They can have multiple transmitters so the whole crew can wear them.
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Old 12-03-2012, 03:03 PM   #46
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Where do you stow your life ring?

My newly purchased GB36 has it back near the mast. I or my wife would have to leave either helm to toss it. I plan to move it to the side of the flybridge just above the lower helm door so it is in easy reach from both helms. I have used throw bags in the past for easy and tangle free throwing (also protects the line from the sun). Also, it is not recommended to have a heavy water light attached unless you are cruising after dark. It affects the toss and can hurt or worse. The horse collar is good for lifting and is good for a backup if you throw the ring and line all at once as your nearest floating object.

A good drill is to fill a pair of coveralls with two life jackets filling the arms and legs. It doesn't give you the weight of a real person, though. Another is to throw over a cantaloupe. It's about the size of a human head and that's all you're probably going to see if someone is in the water. (also biodegradable if you can't find it.) A weighted balloon would be fine too.
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Old 12-04-2012, 05:30 AM   #47
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One ring is on the aft deck, one is on the fly bridge, and a Lifesling is on the Starboard side of the pilothouse.
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Old 12-07-2012, 01:06 PM   #48
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Our hard cased lifesling is on the aft deck. I need to pull it out after all these years and make sure it is serviceable.

Another related question: Is your PFD auto-inflate when you get wet?
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Old 12-07-2012, 02:25 PM   #49
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Keep in mind except in calm weather the swim platform will be playing "whack a mole" with whoever is in the water.
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Old 12-07-2012, 05:11 PM   #50
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I realy have done some thinking again once more about my MOB recovery options.

My go to on the water system is the 12 foot livingston. Its always in the water beside or behind the oldfishboat.

From that platform even the Admiral all 100 lbs of her, can manage a recovery of most from the water. Roll the MOB into das boat is easiest compared to trying to pull them in over the gunnel.

I can go on about the options using this system. But I have recovered alot of folk from the water over the years. Karma ? Could be from the time I was the MOB and rescued after being way too long in the water in April. They could hear me miles away , could not see me but found me eventualy. Saved my sorry ass.

Life ring on the back deck or slung on the side of the cabin I have. But you make a choice. Toss with rope attached in hopes you get it there and the MOB can hold on. That you dont foul the running gear on it. Or toss with out rope so the MOB has something to float with specialy if there is no PFD involved. But end up loosing sight.

Ladder or harnes ? on one occassion I got in the water to assist the person to use a boarding device. That can be one tough call to make.

If you fall over board try to remember to make a ton of noise !!!!!!!! What ever that takes how ever you manage that. I still believe there is sound reasons for wearing or having a whistle with you while on or around the water.

Realy is a scary subject with no one answer fits all.

Random thoughts, again.
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Old 12-07-2012, 05:59 PM   #51
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Keep in mind except in calm weather the swim platform will be playing "whack a mole" with whoever is in the water.
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So are all parts of the boat...

If you cut the engine/go to neutral, usually the boat will turn broadside to the wind/waves and the roll axis is the center of the swim platform...probably the least amount of motion.

At least it is on many of the boats I've had to pull people out of the water into.
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Old 12-07-2012, 07:53 PM   #52
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Wrong place and should be under the humor section but it is keeping with the topic

Newfie calls on the VHF
Man overboard by'e, me wife

This is the Canadian Coast Guard - may I have your location?

Newfie - ere by'e

CCG - can you be more specific sir

Newfie- lardtundern jes's by'e - I'm not in da pacific I'm in the Alantic ya hask me were I was and hi said i was ere, are ya dat stun, now get ere me wife is overbord.

CCG - sir can you please slow down and give is your location

Newfie - fk by'e, I ain't movin, ya kummin or not

CCG - sorry sir we meant you were talking too fast and wanted to understand what you were saying so please talk slower so sir tell us what you see and give us your coordinates

Newfie - I......sees.......me.....dog, .....me.....flashlight.....and.....me.....tools... ..but.....no.....cords.

CCG - are you near you favorite fishing ground sir or near a special spot?

Newfie - nope, i'm nowhere close to hanyting.

CCG - sir unless you tell us your location we can't help you

Newfie - alls wrong is yer as stun as me arse, let me talk to someone else.

CCG - okay sir we have another Newfoundlander here we will ask him to talk to you.

CCG - weresyahat by'e got arin

Newfie - narin, at da cove and me wife fell over by'e, not stun I no.

CCG - yas by'e da women ain't built like dai use to be, ya still see er bobin

Newfie - nope not bobin anymore, she just got on me boat

CCG - some glad by'e she made it

Newfie - ( ladies voice ) me skipper is hoverboard, don't bother by'e, hif he can't swim ome to bad.

Sent from my iPhone using Trawler
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Old 12-08-2012, 11:30 AM   #53
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And therein lies the problem. From everything I've read, been told, and learned in class, most people who go into the water unexpectedly don't have anything resembling a wit about them. And the colder the water, the more helpless a person immediately is. Someone who goes over in the Gulf or Southern California may have a good chance of having the presence of mind to use a radio. I bet if I threw someone in the water up here when they were least expecting it, even if they had a VHF attached to their belt, 99 percent of them would not use it.
Marin, I've had some first hand experience in cold water and I would disagree with your statement.

Several years ago I got a line caught in both props while we were out on the Columbia at night. It was October, the water temp was 53° and the air temp about 60°. I dropped the anchor, then had no choice but to go under the boat to cut the lines out of the props. I had no mask and snorkel, no fins, no wetsuit, nothing.

I stuck a flashlight (Maglite D-Cell light) between my legs and had a steak knife in my teeth. I got beneath the swim platform, fill my lungs with air then dive below the boat and start cutting. I had just enough light from the flashlight to see where the props and shafts were, but not much more, and it took repeated dives to cut the line loos from both props and both shafts.

I was in the water 35 minutes before I got all the lines cut off, then was able to get back on the boat, start the engines, raise the anchor, and drive it back to the slip.

I'm a pretty big guy (6'1", 240#) but by most charts I've seen I should either have been dead or near-dead after that much time in the water at 53°.

I think a lot of whether or not a person survives an unintended swim has to do with his mindset. Like many situations where it's an extreme emergency or where there is an injury involved, if the victim's mindset is that he will survive the situation, he will do it. Conversely, if a person believes he's going to die just because he fell in the cold water, he probably will.

To answer XFEDEX's question.....mine is an automatic inflatable and I have a strobe light attached to it at the collar. If I go overboard at night I want people to see where I am.
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Old 12-08-2012, 12:46 PM   #54
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Marin, I've had some first hand experience in cold water and I would disagree with your statement.
It wasn't my statement, it was the statement and opinion of the University of Washington's School of Medicine's then-leading-expert on hypothermia and the psychology of victims who go in the water. If you want to challenge his opinion you'll have to talk to him.

Your experience is the exception, not the norm, and you went into the water deliberately and mentally prepared to do so. Not really relevant to a person, particularly an older person, who suddenly finds him or herself in extremely cold water totally unprepared both physically and mentally. Unless these people are retrieved very quickly their chances of survival are slim to none as is demonstrated around here a number of times each year.
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Old 12-08-2012, 12:49 PM   #55
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Another related question: Is your PFD auto-inflate when you get wet?
No, they auto-inflate when they sense the slight increase in pressure when they go underwater. Our old ones inflate when the trigger dissolves in water.
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Old 12-08-2012, 04:56 PM   #56
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Your comment....
"Your experience is the exception, not the norm, and you went into the water deliberately and mentally prepared to do so. Not really relevant to a person, particularly an older person, who suddenly finds him or herself in extremely cold water totally unprepared both physically and mentally. Unless these people are retrieved very quickly their chances of survival are slim to none as is demonstrated around here a number of times each year. "

My comment....
"I think a lot of whether or not a person survives an unintended swim has to do with his mindset. Like many situations where it's an extreme emergency or where there is an injury involved, if the victim's mindset is that he will survive the situation, he will do it. Conversely, if a person believes he's going to die just because he fell in the cold water, he probably will"

Marin, A person's mindset can be created prior to an emergency happening. I spent many years in law enforcement, much of that time I was training officers on survival techniques. It's been demonstrated many times that an officer who is seriously wounded but had already developed a survival mentality would be much more likely to survive his wounds than an officer who had never even considered it.

I believe the same could hold true for a boater. If he created ahead of time a mindset that he was going to survive falling into cold water that would greatly increase.
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Old 12-08-2012, 05:23 PM   #57
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I believe the same could hold true for a boater. If he created ahead of time a mindset that he was going to survive falling into cold water that would greatly increase.
i don't argue your theory at all. But I think you will find it does not apply to 99.9999 percent of recreational boaters, or at least powerboaters. They don't think that anything like an MOB will happen to them so they are not going around mentally prepared for it to happen.

Blue water racing sailboat crews are another matter as are (probably) the relatively few powerboat passagemakers who go long distances on the open ocean.

But the typical folks out on the lake or motoring along in coastal waters I daresay are not giving any thought whatsoever to being mentally prepared for a tumble off the boat. Which I suspect is why such a high proportion of them die when they do, at least in the cold water regions.
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Old 12-09-2012, 01:10 AM   #58
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Hi Marin. I love the sound of your boat's name "La Pérouse" - but what does it mean?
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Old 12-09-2012, 01:12 AM   #59
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As a thought, I carry a small cyclst's crash helmet for when I dive over the side of Play d'eau. It has plenty of holes in it top to the air out.
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Old 12-09-2012, 04:18 AM   #60
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Hi Marin. I love the sound of your boat's name "La Pérouse" - but what does it mean?
It doesn't mean anything. It's a person's name. Jean-Francois de Galaup, compte de Lapérouse . Commonly referred to as Jean-Francois de La Pérouse or simply La Pérouse.

He was a French naval commander in the 1700s who commanded a warship in the French navy in support of the Americans in our revolutionary war. He later commanded a round the world voyage of discovery along the lines of one of his heroes, Captain Cook. He was the first French explorer to visit the Pacific Northwest and SE Alaska.

His two year voyage came to an end in the southwestern Pacific when his two ships were wrecked on a reef. La Pérouse himself was lost when he and a small crew of survivors disappeared when they set sail in a boat built from the wreckage of one his ships to try to get to New Zealand for help.

There is a synopsis of his life and career in Wikipedia if you want more details. I have a two-volume English translation of his journals from this voyage which were prepared and published by the Hakluyt Society. La Pérouse sent his journals back to Paris overland with one of his scientists before leaving the northwestern Pacific for Australia. Fascinating guy.

We picked the name before we ever had a boat to go with it. I am half French. My father was as French as they come. So there were a number of "connections" with the name. My heritage, our being in the Pacific Northwest which La Pérouse visited, and my growing up in Hawaii which La Pérouse alo visited. There are places named after him in the PNW, SE Alaska, Hawaii, the northwestern Pacific, and Australia.

La Pérouse was from Albi in south central France, hence the name of our current dog (he's in the dogs on board thread). We have visited Albi, a smallish, red brick city on the Tarn River, where they have a museum dedicated to La Pérouse with artifacts recovered from the wrecks of his ships, his papers and journals, paintings and other things related to his career and voyages. Albi is also the hometown of Toulouse Lautrec.
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