Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-18-2014, 11:30 AM   #21
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by fstbttms View Post
Two words- hull cleaner!

Work when you want. Money can be good.
I wouldn't do what my diver does for what I pay him.
__________________
Advertisement

rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 12:22 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
fstbttms's Avatar
 
City: Under a boat, in a marina in the San Francisco Bay
Country: USA
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 447
Quote:
Originally Posted by WesK View Post
I wouldn't do what my diver does for what I pay him.
Which is why this could be a good gig for the OP. Most people won't (or can't) do this work themselves.
__________________

__________________
Clean bottoms are FastBottoms!
fstbttms is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 02:43 PM   #23
TF Site Team
 
Baker's Avatar
 
City: League City, Tx
Country: Texas
Vessel Model: Carver 356
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,633
My only warning is to BEWARE of merging your passion with a "job". I realize you are seeking flexibility and a line of work purely for your enjoyment. And hopefully you can pull that off. But there can be the problem of turning your passion into a job...potentially marring what you once loved.

Otherwise, all great advice and a interesting thread!!!!
__________________
Prairie 29...Perkins 4236...Sold
Mainship Pilot 30...Yanmar 4LHA-STP...Sold
Carver 356...T-Cummins 330B
Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 03:29 PM   #24
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,986
I haven’t read every portion of every post on this thread - so, maybe this has already been mentioned??

Years ago (late 1980's / early 90's) I knew a guy who lived aboard his boat at a marina and he seemed to have 2 to 4 persons working for him - maybe more, I never knew how many for sure?? His business was cleaning, shining, painting and doing general repairs inside/outside on boats while they were wet or dry. He and his workers were known in several marinas and appeared to stay busy. Seldom would I notice him doing any of the work himself... guess he just supervised! I'm sure, especially as a start-up, you would have competition galore and in 21st Century litigiousness you'll probably need biz license as well as insurance to show marinas/boatyards managers ... But, If you could break into that marine-worthy racket and make a go of it you might make pretty good income with time left for cruising/relaxing.

Happy Marine-Biz Daze! – And, Good Luck!! Art
Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 04:02 PM   #25
TF Site Team
 
ksanders's Avatar
 
City: SEWARD ALASKA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: LISAS WAY
Vessel Model: BAYLINER 4788
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,956
I have not read every post in is thread either, but...

It seems that it would be easier and more lucrative to adapt what you are already good at to the lifestyle you want, rather than starting off in life anew.

For example I have adapted my power systems business so I can run it from my boat (or anywhere for that matter).

I cannot imagine doing it the other way around.
__________________
Kevin Sanders
Bayliner 4788
Seward, Alaska
www.mvlisasway.com
ksanders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 04:41 PM   #26
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,183
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksanders View Post
I have not read every post in is thread either, but...

It seems that it would be easier and more lucrative to adapt what you are already good at to the lifestyle you want, rather than starting off in life anew.

For example I have adapted my power systems business so I can run it from my boat (or anywhere for that matter).

I cannot imagine doing it the other way around.
Always best to build on existing skills and experience if possible. I have to second the above comment about combining your passion and your job having the potential of turning it all into a job. For instance, the person servicing all those boats. He probably can't go to a marina now just on vacation as people approach wanting him to work.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 04:54 PM   #27
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,986
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
Always best to build on existing skills and experience if possible. I have to second the above comment about combining your passion and your job having the potential of turning it all into a job. For instance, the person servicing all those boats. He probably can't go to a marina now just on vacation as people approach wanting him to work.
I imagine that would be the case in local mariners where he is known... but... on vacation to mariners out of his territory I doubt if any boater would know he accomplishes work on boats. That said; it probably would be good idea to keep the $$$ work you do in range of your best knowledge/passion while living the marine life!
Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2014, 05:29 PM   #28
Moderator Emeritus
 
jwnall's Avatar
 
City: St. Marks, Florida
Country: US
Vessel Name: Morgan
Vessel Model: Gulfstar 36
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3,621
I was trying to remember the different cruiser "businesses" that I saw when we were cruising on the sailboat back in the late 90's. There was the guy near the Indiantown marina who came down during the season pulling a trailer, and did canvas work. He had all his supplies in the trailer, and when it got hot weather he pulled up and went further north. He talked about his boat, but it was in North Carolina.

There was the lady in Isla Mujeres, Mexico, who was a vet in real life, and would administer to Fido and Meow. She singlehanded a small sailboat, and had a boyfriend who traveled with her but also singlehanded his own boat.

The guy in Rio Dulce who was a diesel mechanic. He was the only one that I saw advertise - the others all seemed to be word of mouth. He would always come on the morning VHF net and advertise his services.

The lady in Rio Dulce who taught yoga classes to the cruisers.

And, as already pointed out, cleaning bottoms. Saw several of those.

All of these (except the canvas guy) were cruisers and lived on their boat full time.
__________________

__________________
John
jwnall is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:04 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012