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Old 04-20-2017, 10:29 AM   #1
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Mainship 40 as a starter vessel?

I am interested in learning more about expedition cruising, and my impression is that it would be a good idea to get a season or two of experience in a relatively smaller vessel before investing in a larger, ocean-going ship.

One candidate type of vessel I have been looking at is the Mainship 40 Sedan Bridge. Would a boat like this be a good starter vessel for someone to get their feet wet and get on the right path to expedition cruising?

(Note: I am single, so I have no need to accommodate a family, and typically I would be cruising alone or with a small number (2-4) friends.)

[I have posted this in General Discussion because I did not see a sub-forum specifically dedicated to discussing boat types.]
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Old 04-20-2017, 11:01 AM   #2
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Yes.

If you have never owned a boat before a 17' Whaler for a season or two of day trips along with selective charters of progressively larger boats in a variety of areas would not be a bad way to get experience either.

Bought well neither the Whaler nor Mainship should depreciate much in two years if properly maintained. Good luck and enjoy your journey.
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Old 04-20-2017, 11:12 AM   #3
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Is this your first boat? A Mainship 40 Sedan is not 'small vessel'. The mainship 40 has a nice feature in that you can access the bow through a centerline walkthrough from the bridge. Single handed line handling might be tricky with a flybridge even with this feature.
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Old 04-20-2017, 04:22 PM   #4
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I love the Mainship 40 sedan for the front walk through as mentioned but more so for the stairs to the bridge instead of a ladder. I have been on a couple though and would not consider it for single handed boating. Also they are thirsty devils but there are a number out there with diesels, mostly Yanmars, and run at hull speed they may be relatively economical.
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Old 04-20-2017, 04:38 PM   #5
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Expedition cruising? That suggests blue water passages to interesting places, like maybe the Galapagos on the west coast or the San Blas Islands on the east coast of Panama? If that is your interest then you will ultimately need a much higher quality boat, like a Nordhavn or at least a Kady Krogen.

But a Mainship 40 or maybe the smaller Mainship 34T would be a good boat to get some experience on. There was a recent thread comparing the two- Difference between a Mainship 34 and 40

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Old 04-21-2017, 08:22 AM   #6
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One candidate type of vessel I have been looking at is the Mainship 40 Sedan Bridge. Would a boat like this be a good starter vessel for someone to get their feet wet and get on the right path to expedition cruising?

Gas boat? From early- to mid-90's? (Don't remember if they made any of these with diesel power...)

Gas might not be my first choice for "expedition cruising" -- although maybe some of the other Mainship models could work very well.

Could be great for inland and coastal puttering, especially if the boat isn't moved very often, or very far, at a time... weather permitting. Mostly I'm thinking of fuel costs at planing speeds...

But then I'm also thinking a better "starter vessel" is the one you'd buy after your first boat. By your last boat first, so to speak. (Seldom works for everyone, but the theory sounds good on paper.)

-Chris
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Old 04-22-2017, 08:32 AM   #7
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Well, your insurance company may not let you go "expedition" without a licensed captain or your proof of considerably more experience. However, it is a worthy goal.
Attend powerboating classes, get certifications, crew on other boats, join local clubs and build your boathandling resume.
Singlehandling a 40 can be a challenge, but there are techniques and tools you can use to snag a cleat or buoy, or anchor in the wind. You have to practice, practice, practice.
Good luck, pursue your dreams.
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Old 04-22-2017, 09:48 AM   #8
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Gas boat? From early- to mid-90's? (Don't remember if they made any of these with diesel power...)

Gas might not be my first choice for "expedition cruising" -- although maybe some of the other Mainship models could work very well.

Could be great for inland and coastal puttering, especially if the boat isn't moved very often, or very far, at a time... weather permitting. Mostly I'm thinking of fuel costs at planing speeds...

But then I'm also thinking a better "starter vessel" is the one you'd buy after your first boat. By your last boat first, so to speak. (Seldom works for everyone, but the theory sounds good on paper.)

-Chris
I would not be starting out on ocean voyages. I would be making mostly short coastal trips. Boston to Maine would be longest that I am considering for my first season of boating. I realize that I might burn $1000 in gas in a trip like that, but that is not a problem for me. For a permanent vessel doing longer voyages (in the distant future) I definitely would go diesel.
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Old 04-22-2017, 10:28 AM   #9
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I would not be starting out on ocean voyages. I would be making mostly short coastal trips. Boston to Maine would be longest that I am considering for my first season of boating. I realize that I might burn $1000 in gas in a trip like that, but that is not a problem for me. For a permanent vessel doing longer voyages (in the distant future) I definitely would go diesel.

Sure, fair enough. My main point was that if you already know (think) you'll want a boat more suitable for longer distances and slightly further offshore... that "permanent vessel" sometimes makes a better first boat.. given the costs involved with buying, fixing, using, selling something less capable.

The other side of that coin is that if you don't know enough to pin down what specific features you need/want/would like to have... even that "permanent vessel" (if bought first) might not be exactly right.

-Chris
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Old 04-22-2017, 10:37 AM   #10
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Well, your insurance company may not let you go "expedition" without a licensed captain or your proof of considerably more experience. However, it is a worthy goal.
Attend powerboating classes, get certifications, crew on other boats, join local clubs and build your boathandling resume.
Singlehandling a 40 can be a challenge, but there are techniques and tools you can use to snag a cleat or buoy, or anchor in the wind. You have to practice, practice, practice.
Good luck, pursue your dreams.
If I’m stepping on some toes I apologies for injecting my question in this thread, but the originator and I have something in common as first time buyers. I’d just like to expand it a little more for those of you got insurance and a loan to buy your boat.
I’m a newbie as well and I’ve picked up a great deal of knowledge from this forum and one of the things I like the most about this forum is how tolerant the members are when newbies like me ask dumb questions that may have been asked a thousand times before. I’m also considering a 40’ Trawler for my first boat. I have zip experience and have only just started on my quest. I’ve bought Chapmans, Powerboat Guide and Preliminary design of Boats and Ships so I could learn more about hull design and their effect with waves. l love roomy the lay out the 40’ Mainship, but gas scares me, I’m going with a 40’ Trawler that has a economical single diesel engine with a displacement hull for my first boat.
I read about the importance of getting a Captains License for the insurance companies. I may have to finance part of the cost for my first boat because from this forum I’ve learned to look for a boat I want rather than buying outright a "deal" I can pay for in cash. What do the finance companies look for when someone like me with limited experience wants to get a loan to buy a boat? I plan to get some experience prior to buying, but will I need a Captains License to get a loan or get insured?
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Old 04-22-2017, 10:46 AM   #11
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Sure, fair enough. My main point was that if you already know (think) you'll want a boat more suitable for longer distances and slightly further offshore... that "permanent vessel" sometimes makes a better first boat.. given the costs involved with buying, fixing, using, selling something less capable.

The other side of that coin is that if you don't know enough to pin down what specific features you need/want/would like to have... even that "permanent vessel" (if bought first) might not be exactly right.

-Chris
And that my friend sums up my opinion of the whole "buy your last boat first" line of thinking. If my yacht broker friends are to be trusted, most seasoned boat owners rarely settle down until at least their 3rd boat or so.

Starter boats make infinitely more sense than trying to buy a far more expensive and specialized cruising boat first. I've lost track of the 'new to boating straight to cruising' types we have seen on this forum that swallowed the anchor and moved on in less than two years. It normally has less to do with picking the wrong boat than learning what all is involved with boating. It would be nice if the ones who quit the game entirely would post their reasoning but they never do...
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Old 04-22-2017, 10:51 AM   #12
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In my own experience, financial companies are less concerned with your experience and more with your finances. It helps if the survey does not identify too many significant problems, and the valuation is close to the offer price. My loan was contingent on the serious issues being resolved before sale.
The insurance company took my experience and certifications (US Navy and Power Squadron courses, previous boat ownership, motor vehicle driving record, and more) and issued the policy with restrictions. For my Nauticat 44 ketch, I was in the San Francisco Bay area, and not allowed to go outside the Gate without a licensed captain on board. I was enrolled in an offshore sailing school, and presume that with that cert and some documented hours as crew outside the Gate, the restriction would have been lifted. Life changes forced me to abandon that objective, but I am back in the game now.
I have not direct experience, but I understand if you are on the ICW, the insurance may restrict you to an area based on the season of the year and predicted weather patterns. YMMV.
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Old 04-22-2017, 10:53 AM   #13
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l love roomy the lay out the 40í Mainship, but gas scares me, ...

I read about the importance of getting a Captains License for the insurance companies. I may have to finance part of the cost for my first boat because from this forum Iíve learned to look for a boat I want rather than buying outright a "deal" I can pay for in cash. What do the finance companies look for when someone like me with limited experience wants to get a loan to buy a boat? I plan to get some experience prior to buying, but will I need a Captains License to get a loan or get insured?

Gas is very viable, for the right purpose.

The finance company usually won't care much about your experience; they'll likely pay more attention to the age and condition of the boat.

The insurance companies will want some kind of experience, relative to the size/cost/etc of the target boat BUT... Captain's Licenses aren't usually necessary, especially for recreational boating, unless you're starting huge.

Prior experience in smaller boats can count, to an extent. Classroom coursework (USCG Aux and US Power Squadron courses, for example) and on-the-water training (hire a captain for a day or a week or whatever) can solve insurance, in many -- maybe most -- cases. Again assuming you're not starting huge. 40' is not huge.

You MAY eventually get a slightly reduced rate on your insurance if you eventually get a Captain's License. OTOH, by the time it takes to do that, you may have already earned all the discounts that company offers.

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Old 04-22-2017, 10:59 AM   #14
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And that my friend sums up my opinion of the whole "buy your last boat first" line of thinking. If my yacht broker friends are to be trusted, most seasoned boat owners rarely settle down until at least their 3rd boat or so.

Starter boats make infinitely more sense than trying to buy a far more expensive and specialized cruising boat first. I've lost track of the 'new to boating straight to cruising' types we have seen on this forum that swallowed the anchor and moved on in less than two years. It normally has less to do with picking the wrong boat than learning what all is involved with boating. It would be nice if the ones who quit the game entirely would post their reasoning but they never do...

Heh... yep, it took us three boats to get where we are now... and I'd probably get the fourth one even closer to the mark.



That said, the first came very close, so we've mostly been tweaking it along the way.

And in fact, even the step-up boats haven't been much more expensive or specialized; improvements have been mostly from evolution in the market place (stairs to the flybridge not as uncommon, now) and from going a bit larger in size so the master stateroom can incorporate a centerline berth.

Probably my theory is more likely "buy your best guess first" -- slightly different than the "starter boat" idea, but maybe that's just semantics.

-Chris
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Old 04-22-2017, 11:21 AM   #15
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Spending time on other boats is a great way to learn what features for you would be "nice to have" and "mandatory" If you belong to a club you can usually get time on boats just by volunteering to crew for others. You'll get an idea of different layouts, features, etc. Guys generally love to talk about their boats as well. You can learn a lot in an afternoon from a knowledgable guy ( or gal ) by simply saying something like....so..."why'd you pick this boat"....and then sit back an listen. Plus you'll get to see how often a bow thruster is used....is an autopilot important...do you like a cockpit or aft-cab, etc. Good luck..post often so we can also learn right along with you.
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Old 04-22-2017, 11:43 AM   #16
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Greetings,
Mr.j. As far as financing, I don't think the finance company or bank really cares all that much about what boat you buy as long as IF you default they won't lose $$.
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Old 04-22-2017, 11:44 AM   #17
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The reason I joined this forum is to learn from you guys and avoid swallowing the anchor I'm sure Gas is just fine, but in another life while I was a Forest Ranger I was in a Gasoline explosion, I'm not comfortable with gas. I'm "in" this for the long haul and I expect to make a lot of mistakes along the way. I like you're "My best guess first" it's about all I'll have to go on after I've armed myself with as much knowledge as I can pump from you and others who have more experience than I have. I'm not running a race this time, soon, I'll be able to ask more intelligent questions about a Captains Licenses and other issues. I'm not afraid to make a move even if its wrong. It took you 3 boats to get where you are now, I may not buy the right boat first, I'll try and I hope I do, but its all about the journey, not the destination.
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Old 04-25-2017, 06:42 AM   #18
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"expedition cruising" ?

I do not think a Mainship has the scantlings or construction for this.
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Old 04-25-2017, 07:17 AM   #19
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This is a bit like the OctoMum (sorry, Mum with 5 kids) thread. No experience of any sort and expecting to learn and accumulate years of experience on her first 65ft boat without a full time captain. Remember, she did all the work upgrading the boat like a condo, never once left port and sold it a year later. Totally ignored all the sage advise from the TF.
Forget gas vs diesel (gas makes no sense for cruising), how about understanding the basics of boating, navigation, maintenance, etc? Start out with a 20ft + vessel and learn something before jumping into a boat that will likely be beyond your initial capabilities. A few years with a smaller vessel will potentially equip you to go bigger - you may have even changed your mind by then!!
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Old 04-25-2017, 08:46 AM   #20
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You don't have to go from 0 - 100 overnight, that is have no experience to buying a boat. You can take a three day powerboat class for $1000 - $1500, during which you could specify single or twin engine, trawler or non-trawler. Afterwards, you could charter a couple of boats (with or without a captain) and get a feel for the type (and size) of boat you might light to buy.

Unless you know for sure what kind of boat you want to buy, IMHO it is foolish to jump in and purchase a boat. Selling your used boat is not like selling a car. It takes time and money (often broker fees) to sell a boat.

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