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Old 08-12-2019, 03:14 PM   #21
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City: FtMorgan Alabama
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Vessel Name: Hattitude
Vessel Model: Hatteras 32 Flybridge
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Originally Posted by LateStarter View Post
I am 74, new to boating and thing about purchasing a 1984 Mainship 40
Double Cabin. It is equipped with twin Crusader 350 engines. Initially, I plan to use the boat for local cruising,but eventually want to take extended trips down to Florida and the Carribean.

My question is whether or not this is too much boat for a newbie.

Additionally, does anyone know if this is a full or partial displacement hull?
How will it handle in open water?

All advice and opinions are welcomed.

Having refurbished a 1987 Hatteras 32 FlyBridge I offer the following.




I would run / not walk from the Crusader engines and gas system on the Mainship. For what you are planning to they are to dangerous and expensive. The gas bill will be horrendous.


Even if Mainship has an aluminum gas tank there are still all the other negatives.I am still wary.


When i refurbished my boat;

My gas tank was shot (Ethanol) Hatteras claimed they had ethanol resistant resin in 1986 but mine was a mess. I replaced Crusaders with Cummins Diesels. My deal is off shore / close shore fishing. I am 99% Complete and love the boat. The Diesels are awesome compared to Gas.
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Old 08-12-2019, 04:08 PM   #22
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Docking may be only 5 minutes per 8 hours, but it can sometimes be stressful, especially when single handing, and for good reason.

It all depends on the situation. Which way is the wind going relative to the boat? Is it gusty or steady? Is the water movement in the same direction? How wide is the fairway to turn the final angle of approach? Do boats stick out really far? How wide is the slip? Is it a single or a double? Are the fingers full length or just stubs? Bow in or stern in? If you decide to back out, where will the wind and water leave you?

I, personally, am at the low end of the talent scale and can only pull it off because of practice. When I don't drive for a while and the wind or water whip up, I need a crew. Good days I'm fine. And I drive a twin screw.

Some friends, they are just natural. They wont drive a boat for 2-3 years, grab the controls of an unfamiliar 45' boat, and glide it right in.

The boat itself also matters. I used to think my 42' Californian handled great. But now having a 42' Hardin Europa with about the same LOA, beam, and draft, I'm in awe with how much more responsive itnfeels and steady it seems to steer. The wind seems to matter a lot less coming in andbthe rudders feels more responsice, especially at slow speeds. The rudders may just be bigger. I'm not sure why it feels like the wind matters a lot less coming in, but maybe because the cabin sits lower in the hull so it has less bondage, orbit may be that it has a full keel, or both.

Regardless, I dont think docking is anything to be afraid of. It gets much easier with practice. But, there are a lot of variables and, yes, it can be stressful, and, yes, you can cause a lot of expensive damage to your own boat and the boats of your neighbors. It happens many weekends at most marinas, I'd guess.
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Old 08-12-2019, 05:16 PM   #23
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City: New Baltimore
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Mainship

I own a 42DC . It is a semi displacement hull. I find it easy to handle. I have been boating for over 50 years. It is powered with 350 engines. If I cruise at 18
miles an hour at 2800 RPM's I get good gas mileage. I love my Mainship. You will not be disappointed.
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Old 08-12-2019, 05:56 PM   #24
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Hi Pete, I have to disagree with you on docking. I have been boating most of my life, and I'm old, and I still stress about docking, especially in wind or current. You get 15-30 tons of boat crashing into things (other boats, docks, pilings) and damage is going to be done, never mind that you will be embarrassed because someone always sees the bad landings.
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Old 08-12-2019, 06:18 PM   #25
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A good friend bought a 36’ Hatteras with crusader gas engines. The boat was nice and fit his needs, but he ended up using it less and less and eventually selling it because if the cost if fuel. It drank gas like a rabid fan drinks beer at a tailgate party! I know the arguments about initial cost vs. operating cost etc., but psychologically, when you go to fill up again and again and are only getting < 1 mile/gallon, it starts to dissuade you from going out. There are enough boats with diesels around that you should be able to find one that meets your needs. Don't be afraid of lots if hours on a diesel, as long as it has been well maintained and you get it surveyed. In fact, substantial hours may actually be better than too few!
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Old 08-12-2019, 06:32 PM   #26
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Agree. Age is only a number. Nobody knows anything until they learn. I had no idea what I was getting into with my first boat. You’ll learn. You’ll be creative and surprise yourself at the things you can do. Get the boat you want and learn it and on it. We all need to live our dream.
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Old 08-12-2019, 09:17 PM   #27
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Quote:
Initially, I plan to use the boat for local cruising,but eventually want to take extended trips down to Florida and the Carribean.
. The Mainship 40 DC only has 300 gallons of fuel. If you run at planing speed (18 or so knots), you will not have a long range--(not knowing what you mean by Caribbean or the Bahamas, which are a bit different.)

The Double Cabin is not an easy boat to deal with in docking. If there is a low or floating dock, it is some distance down--from the deck of the boat--especially the aft deck. A boat with a walk around and lower freeboard/cockpit will be easier to handle.
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Old 08-13-2019, 08:07 AM   #28
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Can't repeat it enough hire a captain to teach you how to run dock and do basic maintenance checks . That boat is a handful to dock single handed on a good day add 20 knots of wind and it will look like a fire drill in a marina with your neighbors trying to save their boats as you're crashing in to them . Totally irresponsible to be fooling around with a heavy 40'er near other people's boats start with a Sunfish until you understand wind and current .
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Old 08-13-2019, 10:21 AM   #29
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Can't repeat it enough hire a captain to teach you how to run dock and do basic maintenance checks . t .
Or get someone from the marina either one of the mechanics or another owner to show you the ropes.
This happens at our marina often. Most are more than willing to help.
And then there are those who absolutely refuse help or suggestions. Those are the ones who generally will never "get it".
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Old 08-13-2019, 02:13 PM   #30
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City: Sidney, BC
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I don't think that 40' is too much boat but a 1984, twin gas boat is going to be a major maintenance problem.
I am 75 and I handle my Mainship 390, single diesel, with bow thruster with no problem, either solo or with the Admiral who is a similar age.
We picked the Mainship because it was easily handled shorthanded. The secret is stairs, not a ladder to the flybridge and a door at the lower helm position that allows unobstructed access to the deck on the docking side.
If you have grandkids, you will definitely appreciate a second private cabin and the Mainship 350 Trawler and the 390 give you this feature.
Any trawler, semi-displacement hull is going to be a gas guzzler if you try to run it at speed. I cruise at 6.8 to 7 knots at 1700 rpm and burn just over 2 gallons per hour. That speed gives me excellent fuel efficiency, gets me to where I want to go (500-700 NM per year) and allows me to view the whales and other wildlife along the way.
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Old 08-13-2019, 05:04 PM   #31
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Oh, to be that young again--

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Old 08-16-2019, 04:16 AM   #32
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Don't like gas....goes boom too easily. 35 years old? You are going to be replacing lots of engine "stuff".

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Old 08-29-2019, 10:32 AM   #33
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City: Halifax
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LateStarter View Post
I am 74, new to boating and thing about purchasing a 1984 Mainship 40
Double Cabin. It is equipped with twin Crusader 350 engines. Initially, I plan to use the boat for local cruising,but eventually want to take extended trips down to Florida and the Carribean.

My question is whether or not this is too much boat for a newbie.

Additionally, does anyone know if this is a full or partial displacement hull?
How will it handle in open water?

All advice and opinions are welcomed.
Just for context, I'm a fit 59 yr old engineer with a broad set of mechanical, electrical and wood working skills (as most experienced boaters have) and my 1982 diesel single engine trawler often taxes me to the limit mentally, physically and financially. So at 74 yrs old, I definitely think the boat you are considering is a lot more than you should take on. First of all, I think twin engines are not the best option - twice the cost and time for maintenance, and half the space to get at them (at least the outboard sides). As other members have suggested, with your age and experience I would look for a single engine diesel boat in the 28 - 32 ft range. A bow thruster would be nice but this can be added later without breaking the bank. Try to buy a bit newer if you can afford it because any 1984 vintage boat is going to require a lot of work. I bought my 1982 trawler in 2005 and since then I have put well over $50k into her and at least 2000 - 3000 hrs of work. And if I didn't have the skills and every tool known to man, then both those numbers would be a lot higher. I knew what I was getting into and have enjoyed the process but as a new boater that level of effort and expense may come as bit of a shock.

Best of luck with your choice.
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Old 08-29-2019, 10:44 AM   #34
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Listen to Jeff. I have 78 40' Bluewater Pilothouse trawler with 2 Lehmans, new gen set, etc. I am 71, a licensed Professional Engineer and do forensic investigations for building issues and have lots of skills. Luckily, I have every installation and operating manual for every thing installed on this boat and she is in excellent condition. And it still taxes me at times. Spend a little more money and enjoy life. Also, my best accessory on Monarch III is the ice machine. Make sure you get one. :-)
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Old 08-29-2019, 04:10 PM   #35
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I'm also with the single engine diesel crowd and a newer boat. Just go up a few years and get a MS 390.... or the 340 or 400. All good boats, easy to single hand.


While the twin will cost you no more in fuel, and less than double in maintenance, some of the installs are pretty hard to get down there for maintenance and that's a major issue.


Some of the "musts"


1. Get a diesel.... no doubt about it!
2. For single handling, get one that's easy to get around, lower helm door.
3. NO ladders, get stairs.
4. With a single, get a thruster. I know the purests will say you don't need one, but buying it with the boat is SIGNIFICANTLY cheaper, and YES, you'll find it extremely handy.

5. Whatever boat you get, hire a captain that knows your boat to train you. Practice for awhile, and go back with him to brush up on what you forgot.
6. Have fun!





The difference in a 35 to 45 ft boat single handling is minimal. However, if your boating is absolutely minimal, rent a small boat (25 ft or so) and get some training on basic boat ops, wx, regs, limits, etc., etc. And take the online Boat US course (do it regardless).



And FWIW...... Just sold my twin engine gasser, no fresh water cooling, 2003 model. Great boat, but comparing it with my 40ft the maintenance, unexpected and regular was WAY more than the trawler. And the mileage WAY worse... and it was half as big. (however, fun)
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