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Old 02-14-2018, 10:41 AM   #1
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Lower/Raise Mast on Grand Banks 32?

Hi all,
I'm also posting this question on the Grand Banks Owner's Forum, but frankly, MANY more people follow the TF....

So, I have a 1990 GB 32 with a metal mast which I will soon need to lower so the boat can be put on a truck. I have never done this before.

1. Will I need a mast crutch attached to the transom, or can the hinge support the weight of the mast?

2. Will I need a gin pole to raise it? Might the boom work for this?

3. Any other "gotchas" or things I should be thinking about?

Thanks for your advice!
Oldersalt
" Everything on your boat is broken. You just don't know it yet."
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Old 02-14-2018, 02:44 PM   #2
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Hi Oldersalt,

A one-time deal for truck transport? Let the yard that will haul the boat for transport deal with lowering and securing the mast, boom, and other topside "stuff" like your bimini and bridge windscreens. They, and the carrier, will have the knowledge and equipment to properly secure and pad the mast (and boom!) for transport, including lowering, bracing, and dealing with attendant wiring issues, as well as minimizing the air draft to reduce cost. This approach will enhance the probability that all is well at the end of the trip. DIY in this instance is not the place to cut corners to save $$. Truck transport isn't always the soft, velvety ride promised by many truck transporters, and traffic accidents and weather often are problematic.

And ditto upon arrival. Let the launching yard re-commission the rig.

Regards, and remember your mileage may vary. This posting is only my opinion, as asked.

Pete
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Old 02-14-2018, 05:56 PM   #3
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For the most part, I agree, but....... I have had to have my mast dropped on my GB42 to clear the bridges south of Chicago to do the loop. The mast has a radar and an HD7 TV dish on it (dish installed in 2015). Due to the weight of the components I had a marina in Chicago do the drop, and a marina about 40 miles downstream put up the mast. Both were professional marina operations, but even today Iím struggling to get it right. I made my biggest mistake in letting them do the job assuming that it would be straightforward. When the mast went back up the raising marina couldnít get the tension right on the stays. The parts didnít get marked as to what location (for/aft/port/stb) and turnbuckle order (what part when with what turnbuckle/mount). After several swaps/moves we got the tension somewhat right. I then bought new turnbuckles to get it closer. Just today o bought a gauge at West Marine to get the tensions dialed in with the hope to get the HD7 dish to stop its intermittent shaking, something that never happened in the prior years.

Long story short, I would let the professionals do the drop and raise, but donít assume they will be the same folks. Document the arrangement and mark the parts in order to put it back in the exact same configuration. It should be straightforward but didnít take it for granted.

Same probably goes for whatever other parts get removed for the travels..... good luck!!!
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Old 02-14-2018, 06:17 PM   #4
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I drop the teak mast on my 34 Marine Trader each season. I would imagine an aluminum one would weigh less. Putting it up in the spring is also easy. I have a JRC radome mounted on it.

Altogether the mast probably weighs 75-100lbs. It is about 15 foot long. It is mounted in a hinged tabernacle on the aft cabin top. I start by disconnecting the forward stay. At the last minute I disconnect the two forward side stays. Leaving the aft two stays in place I stand on the aft cabin top and walk it into a 4X4" padded crutch that is even with my rear running light. Once it's horizontal I finish disconnecting all the stays and the radome and the tabernacle. I always put the mast inside the boat before shrinkwrapping. The whole process takes an afternoon of preparation with a moment or two of terror. Kind of like life. I have done it both afloat and on the hard.

I also used to drop my Catalina 22's mast. That was a character builder.
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Old 02-14-2018, 07:28 PM   #5
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youtube boat mast raising or lowering.

I use my mast winch and boom to raise and kower mine without even touching it in minutes.
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Old 02-15-2018, 01:41 AM   #6
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Gentlemen,

With all due respect, I think many are missing the gist of Oldersalt's original posting. Oldersalt posed several questions regarding lowering his mast for a one-time TRUCK TRANSPORT. Not for seasonal storage, reducing air draft for passage under a bridge, entering a boat shed, etc. And he further stated "...I've never done this before".

Sure, it's possible to rig his mast for routine lowering and raising. I've rigged mine to facilitate raising and lowering every time I leave and return to my covered moorage. Not as straightforward as some would imagine, but eminently doable with proper rigging and practice.

However, simply getting the mast down is only the 1st part of rigging a boat for truck transport. And securing the mast to prevent damage during that transport isn't "hard" per se, but does demand more than a boom crutch on the transom. For instance, depending on the route, the transporter, height limitations, etc. the mast may have to be completely removed from the boat and attached either on the trailer, or on special racks the transporter provides. This may mean major work on the various cables (particularly the radar coax) to accommodate. Nor can you simply wrap the mast and boom with bubble wrap, and stuff them inside. Not unless you wish to find the interior of your boat swiss-cheesed upon arrival.

I fear this is yet another seemingly simple question asked by a well-intentioned poster that is, in fact, seldom answerable within the limitations of this forum without immense effort. And stating that "...putting it (my mast) up in the spring is easy" and "...the whole process takes an afternoon" is misleading at best. Oldersalt-TALK TO YOUR TRANSPORTER!

And psneeld, just a guess here, but bet your first lowering and raising of your mast was neither easy, accomplished within minutes, or done without touching it. And few tasks in life can be learned on You Tube.

And yup, even the professionals get it wrong sometimes.

Regards,

Pete
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Old 02-19-2018, 10:00 PM   #7
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Jungpeter,

Do you actually talk like that?
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