Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-31-2015, 12:59 PM   #81
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by ancora View Post
.........Latest word is we now have both "C" and "B" docks shut down with a back-hoe comin' in tomorrow.
Underground electrical cable failures are not uncommon. For "mission critical", I suppose there should have been a redundant set of underground cables as well as the spare transformers, panels, breakers, etc.. Or perhaps the cables could have been installed in a conduit so they could be replaced quickly. You would still need an electrical company on call 24/7.

I can't imagine anyone thinking electrical power in a yacht club or marina is any where "mission critical". And I can't see anyone willing to pay the increased costs to make it so.

Bottom line: Shit happens. Deal with it.
__________________
Advertisement

rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2015, 01:13 PM   #82
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by ancora View Post
When we went down to the boat on Monday, we brought our Honda portable gen set (from a previous boat we owned 31 years ago) and a battery charger. Fortunately, we did not have to use them.
Have they told you anything about what the problem or cause was?
__________________

BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2016, 04:51 AM   #83
TF Site Team
 
Bay Pelican's Avatar
 
City: Chicago, IL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bay Pelican
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,792
We are in Rodney Bay Marina in St. Lucia. The shore power is off about three times a day totaling more than 8 hours per day. Not much of a problem for us as we treat the shore power as a silent generator which charges the batteries and heats the water when available. When shore power is available the AC/DC refrigeration switches to AC, when shore power is off the refrigerator switches back to DC.
We are in the marina for only a few days before going to anchor so this is no big deal for us.
There are a few boats not equipped for anchoring out all the time and they are frequently frustrated at the lack of electricity.
For those who know something of the difference between European and North American electricity the Rodney Bay Marina shore power problem is an interesting example of trying to do too much. St. Lucia like all the Eastern Caribbean is 220v 50 hertz. Trinidad is the exception. The majority of docks on St. Lucia and elsewhere are 220 volt 50 hertz. On other English speaking islands the marinas supply 110v 50 hertz power using a step down transformer for the North Americans. I am using 110v to simplify the discussion but it is actually North American 220v versus European 220v. Here everyone calls North American electricity 110v. Back to the marinas. Here in St. Lucia the marina tries to offer 110v 60 hertz (rather than 50 hertz) using a converter. The converter is a disaster. It overheats a couple a times a day and needs to be shut down to cool off.
The irony is that many/most North American boats can accept 50 hertz as we are prepared for it and have bought equipment which accepts both 50 hertz and 60 hertz. On Bay Pelican only the washing machine requires 60 hertz and I can run that off of the inverter.
__________________
Marty
Bay Pelican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2016, 05:59 AM   #84
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,531
"There are a few boats not equipped for anchoring out all the time and they are frequently frustrated at the lack of electricity."

Just the sort of boat to avoid purchasing IF you wish to go cruising.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2016, 06:47 AM   #85
Guru
 
City: Carefree, Arizona
Country: usa
Vessel Name: sunchaser V
Vessel Model: DeFever 48
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6,372
Marty

Good post that speaks to a prime requirement for serious cruisers - living off the grid. Do you have solar panels? If so, how well do they make up for the power interruptions? Also, how frequently do you run your genset when in RB?
sunchaser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2016, 07:06 AM   #86
TF Site Team
 
Bay Pelican's Avatar
 
City: Chicago, IL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bay Pelican
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,792
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunchaser View Post
Marty

Good post that speaks to a prime requirement for serious cruisers - living off the grid. Do you have solar panels? If so, how well do they make up for the power interruptions? Also, how frequently do you run your genset when in RB?
We have two 140 watt solar panels and one Airbreeze wind generator. The combination of solar panels and wind generator has cut our genset use by approximately half. Depending on wind/ sun we run the genset for a hour a day. This may be different this year as the last two years were high wind years and the wind generator was producing a steady 10 amps. On those days we ran the genset long enough to heat water. We use a lot of electricity, our three main uses are the refrigeration, water making and the washing machine.

As to genset use note we have two inverter/chargers which produce a combined 205 amps when we run the genset.
__________________

__________________
Marty
Bay Pelican is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:07 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012