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Old 02-06-2017, 04:50 PM   #1
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Looking at Trawlers to purchase used, need some insight.

I'm in the market for a Trawler to purchase, I've been on and delivered several times a Lord Nelson Victory Tug 37', they do not seem to be made any longer or around very much on any used sites. I am also looking at 32' or 36' Grand Banks vs. Nordic Tug 32' or 34' Can someone give some feedback / insight on the GB vs. Nordic Tugs? I appreciate the feedback, this would be for Great Lakes cruising and Great Loop type running. Pro's -Cons of anyone owning either or by chance ever owned both? Thanks in advance. TonyG
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Old 02-06-2017, 05:59 PM   #2
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Welcome Tony G.


I would say either vessel would do you well for the what your plans are. I am sure some owners of the kind of vessels you are looking at, will chime in shortly.


Myself. I would look closely at the GB, but that is me. It will come down to which vessel fits your needs.


Cheers and the best of luck.


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Old 02-06-2017, 06:26 PM   #3
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Welcome Tony.

In considering the GB vs NT, think about if you want twins or single, and how much exterior teak you want to maintain.
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Old 02-06-2017, 06:36 PM   #4
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I'm OK with a single engine, wouldn't mind a back-up kicker.........but I'm in the woodworking business for the last 30 years and don't want to spend my time maintaining bright work, some is OK, not decks and everything else. Love the look and lines of the GB.....getting scared away by maintenance, I want to enjoy and move and not sand and varnish
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Old 02-06-2017, 06:36 PM   #5
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There is a Lord Nelson 37 for sale on Lake Ontario in Canada and with the American dollar being worth about $1.30 Canadian, you could save a substantial amount. Check it out. You could have it home in just a couple days.

1985 Lord Nelson 37 Victory Tug Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com
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Old 02-06-2017, 06:43 PM   #6
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I think that GBs, NTs, and LNVTs are all very well built boats. The NTs are newer than the others so will be more costly. All depends on what you want in terms of layout and features. One isn't necessarily better than the others.

If you really like the LNVT then look for one that has been repowered, preferably with the more modern Cummins 210 hp engine. A second choice would be the Yanmar 4LH 220 hp engine. I have seen both used in LNVTs for repowers.

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Old 02-06-2017, 06:47 PM   #7
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That is the exact Victory Lord Nelson Tug I used to deliver for the owner on the Great Lakes, very beautiful boat, he finally put stabilizers on her as she would roll at the dock !

Thanks for the link, she's a beauty, I'm very familiar with this boat.
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Old 02-06-2017, 07:01 PM   #8
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My wife and I looked at all three in our recent boat search. We preferred the GB for its wide walk around deck. At our age this was a serious concern, as we will not likely have additional help when docking, etc.
We were fortunate that our neighbor offered his DeFever, but the 36 GB would have been acceptable.
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Old 02-07-2017, 07:10 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyG View Post
I'm OK with a single engine, wouldn't mind a back-up kicker.........but I'm in the woodworking business for the last 30 years and don't want to spend my time maintaining bright work, some is OK, not decks and everything else. Love the look and lines of the GB.....getting scared away by maintenance, I want to enjoy and move and not sand and varnish

Seems to me some of the Monk trawlers didn't beat you up with exterior teak...

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Old 02-07-2017, 07:22 AM   #10
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Deciding on the work input before purchase is a very wise concept.

If you think a bit of brightwork is not fun , think of the delight in repairing/replacing a teak deck over a plywood core.

If your lazy , only contemplate a boat with a GRP deck , which usually locks you into older US boats .

Remember the "trawler" part is usually the deck house not the hull underwater.

A "motor yacht" may not have the bragging rights from an offshore look ,

but may make a far better retirement choice,, if you are lazy.
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Old 02-07-2017, 02:01 PM   #11
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Used Trawlers

As usual, it all depends on budget, intended use, desired level of maintenance effort and, oh yes, budget.

Arthur Beiser said it best....(rough paraphrased quote). "Buy the boat that makes your heart sing." It is, ultimately, a love affair after all.

We recently bought our first trawler after many sailboats up to 36'. Now have a 1990 GB 32.

Pros:
Great lovely traditional look-- a big plus for me (see quote above).
Single engine- lower maint. cost, safer (when running aground). Common engine (135 hp Ford Lehman) is known to be reliable, very common, parts easily available and not especially expensive.
this one...two common weak points, rusting on top of iron fuel tanks and possible deck delam from leaking screws, surveyed fine on this boat.
Incredible construction quality--built hell for stout. After 27 years, there are NO rain leaks on this boat. Even the sliding opening windows don't leak--NO rain-stained teak inside boat. The original headliner throughout the boat is like new Amazing.
Excellent resale value--average depreciation only about 5% per year.
Design: I wanted a flying bridge...nice to have here in California. And the "sedan style" gives us a very nice "back porch" without climbing any ladders.

Cons:
A bit smallish. The head is tight and the shower near to unusable (imagine being locked in a small closet with a large wet dog). The V-berth is ok for two but a bit hard for us older folks to get in/out of. One of those newer walk-around V-berths would be nicer. Basically only sleeps two...the slide-out double in the main cabin really fills up the main cabin. Basically, this boat "drinks 8, eats 6, and sleeps 2."
Lots of varnish. But these days, many of these big projects are becoming, for me, just a "30-second job." (just write a check.)

BTW, we chartered a Nordic Tug 32 a few years ago in the San Juans. Nice boat, well-built apparently. Thought about getting a Nordic Tug but ultimately the GB won. (see quote above). And the universally complimentary comments from dock neighbors is kind of fun, to be honest.

Bottom line...buy the boat that makes your heart sing.

Good luck and good boat hunting!
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Old 02-07-2017, 06:09 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Helen Marie View Post
My wife and I looked at all three in our recent boat search. We preferred the GB for its wide walk around deck. At our age this was a serious concern, as we will not likely have additional help when docking, etc.
We were fortunate that our neighbor offered his DeFever, but the 36 GB would have been acceptable.
Definitely agree about wide walk-around decks. Fortunately, my boat has same but no exterior wood, decks and rails included.
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Old 02-07-2017, 06:43 PM   #13
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My wife and I looked at all three in our recent boat search. We preferred the GB for its wide walk around deck. At our age this was a serious concern, as we will not likely have additional help when docking, etc.
Just a thought on this issue...

When I was looking at power boats, walk around decks was something that I really wanted. I came from sailing where side decks are not only available but necessary. As I looked at boats, I started to slowly change my mind. I ended up with a boat that has no walk around deck, let alone wide.

You mentioned how important this would be at your age. Let me suggest you consider a few things.... It is a bad idea at any age, let alone as we get older, to spring from the deck to the dock off a boat with a high freeboard. Too many things can go wrong. Much safer to be calmly stepping from boat to dock either from a swim step or through a door in your aft cockpit. Docking should be a calm, no rush affair. One of you will step off the stern, secure a line, and then stroll forward to take bow line from the other. That can be done with, or without side decks.

I don't want to discourage you from side decks, they are great and I wish I had them. However, I like the interior room in my boat more than I have a desire for side decks. Just something to think about...
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Old 02-07-2017, 08:46 PM   #14
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Thankfully, my deck is near dock level; no ladder needed to board or leave the boat unless one is invalid.



Nevertheless, many boaters want maximum space/accommodation in their boats (that's not me).
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Old 02-07-2017, 08:49 PM   #15
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Dave, the advantage of walk around decks is the ability to access any part of the lower deck quickly easily and safely. This can be a plus when docking. The alternative forms of access around a boat vary from fair to awful. I call them "cling around" decks, you often have to change hand grips to keep a rails hold while moving about, often changing levels,and with minimal foot room. I have owned both types of boat.
And, you can devote both hands to a task without risk of falling overboard on relinquishing a handhold to complete a 2 handed task. My partner handles the lines when docking decreed no Riviera as the next boat, because of the clingaround decks.
Of course, the big disadvantage of walk around decks is the loss of interior space taken up by the decks, they prune 2 ft+ off the interior width, and that is a real loss.
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Old 02-07-2017, 09:00 PM   #16
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Have sufficient interior space despite walk-around decks.

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Old 02-07-2017, 10:01 PM   #17
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Dave, the advantage of walk around decks is the ability to access any part of the lower deck quickly easily and safely. This can be a plus when docking. The alternative forms of access around a boat vary from fair to awful. I call them "cling around" decks, you often have to change hand grips to keep a rails hold while moving about, often changing levels,and with minimal foot room. I have owned both types of boat.
And, you can devote both hands to a task without risk of falling overboard on relinquishing a handhold to complete a 2 handed task. My partner handles the lines when docking decreed no Riviera as the next boat, because of the clingaround decks.
Of course, the big disadvantage of walk around decks is the loss of interior space taken up by the decks, they prune 2 ft+ off the interior width, and that is a real loss.


I know what you mean by "cling around". A full width saloon like mine avoids that altogether. I simply cannot go around the saloon. I have to go through. Very safe, very protected, and was a concern for me when I first contemplated buying this boat. However, I found very quickly that I was still able to get anywhere I needed quickly and safely.

I had the experience of full walk around decks for 40 years on sailboats from 21' to 40'. I thought it was "the only way". It took me a while to recognize that there are other great options without full walk around decks. I am just encouraging others to not go into boat shopping with unnecessary blinders on.
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Old 02-07-2017, 10:46 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldersalt View Post
As usual, it all depends on budget, intended use, desired level of maintenance effort and, oh yes, budget.

Arthur Beiser said it best....(rough paraphrased quote). "Buy the boat that makes your heart sing." It is, ultimately, a love affair after all.

We recently bought our first trawler after many sailboats up to 36'. Now have a 1990 GB 32.

Pros:
Great lovely traditional look-- a big plus for me (see quote above).
Single engine- lower maint. cost, safer (when running aground). Common engine (135 hp Ford Lehman) is known to be reliable, very common, parts easily available and not especially expensive.
this one...two common weak points, rusting on top of iron fuel tanks and possible deck delam from leaking screws, surveyed fine on this boat.
Incredible construction quality--built hell for stout. After 27 years, there are NO rain leaks on this boat. Even the sliding opening windows don't leak--NO rain-stained teak inside boat. The original headliner throughout the boat is like new Amazing.
Excellent resale value--average depreciation only about 5% per year.
Design: I wanted a flying bridge...nice to have here in California. And the "sedan style" gives us a very nice "back porch" without climbing any ladders.

Cons:
A bit smallish. The head is tight and the shower near to unusable (imagine being locked in a small closet with a large wet dog). The V-berth is ok for two but a bit hard for us older folks to get in/out of. One of those newer walk-around V-berths would be nicer. Basically only sleeps two...the slide-out double in the main cabin really fills up the main cabin. Basically, this boat "drinks 8, eats 6, and sleeps 2."
Lots of varnish. But these days, many of these big projects are becoming, for me, just a "30-second job." (just write a check.)

BTW, we chartered a Nordic Tug 32 a few years ago in the San Juans. Nice boat, well-built apparently. Thought about getting a Nordic Tug but ultimately the GB won. (see quote above). And the universally complimentary comments from dock neighbors is kind of fun, to be honest.

Bottom line...buy the boat that makes your heart sing.

Good luck and good boat hunting!
Oldersalt

"Everything on your boat is broken. You just don't know it yet."
I've always liked the lines of the GB32. I guess that's what attracted me to the Californian 34 LRC. In fact, the 34 LRC was designed as an American built competitor for the GB32.

I also like the ease of movement on a sedan with wide side decks. With the stbd and double aft doors open, sometimes I can't tell the indoors from the outdoors...it's so seamless moving in, out and around on my boat. Every once in a while I bang my head and remember that there's a doorway there.

When I was shopping I strongly preferred twins but my position on that has softened a bit considering all my boating is in the SF Bay and CA Delta. There's always Vessel Assist here, so it's almost like having a get-home engine.

I like NTs and would have a RPH in a larger vessel above 40 ft but prefer the sedan, one-level layout for smaller vessels like my 34. IMO, it's a better alternative for single handing than a full width cabin and the view is always an unimpeeded 360* vista. In any boat for me, a cockpit would be a hard, non-negotiable requirement! I love being close to the water for fishing and climbing back onboard after a dink swim.
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Old 02-07-2017, 11:27 PM   #19
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I had the same situation last fall and dreamed of a few years GB. I went to see a number of Grand Banks 36 and 42 are thought to buy one because of its reputation and they are always on sale here in Europe a number of boats. Nordig Tug boats here in Europe are a rarity, perhaps 10 to 20 pieces. I went to see one and it was something I wanted to even though the price was high. I have not longed for the wide walking decks pages. The machine room has been serviced by the skipper himself. Fuel consumption is very stingy vs GB. Tug Nordig- thought the quality construction y GB is significantly better than any examines the beginning of the recess and the old boats nice all the cables, pipes equipment marked with what they are. You yourself know what you need and criteria, so happy in a boat hunting!


P.S I often doging my NT 37 alone, the long side, stern or the bow first, and always succeed well without the side decks, I go through my boat
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Old 02-07-2017, 11:47 PM   #20
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Thankfully, my deck is near dock level; no ladder needed to board or leave the boat unless one is invalid.



Nevertheless, many boaters want maximum space/accommodation in their boats (that's not me).

Even easier stiff legs to step into the boat. I do not ever need my side decks, I cocpit canopy.
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