Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-01-2013, 11:00 PM   #1
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 73
Looking for a Trawler lots of questions

Hello to everyone. I will be posting this thread to the various makes of trawlers please forgive the redundancies. I am interested in a trawler before I retire in the next couple of years. I've been looking at trawlers for a couple of years and have a good idea of what I am looking at. Currently have a 1966 Californian express cruiser. One of the first models made by Jules Marshall. Partial to his trawler especially the 38ft LRC. My main question on trawlers is performance. Im used to twin screws. A large percentage of the Trawlers I have seen on the market here in So California are Single screws. A few owners I've talked to prefer single screws in their trawlers. Is there an advantage? What are the speed differences between a single screw and a twin screw trawler? I would like to cruise at aprox 10 knots. I am looking in the 38ft range. Mid 70's to 1990 range in age. Lots of Leman 120's and Perkins used in these trawlers. What is an acceptable amount of hours on these engines. I am familiar with gas engines. Is there much diffrence between the Chinese/Taiwanese makes? They are very similar.
Thanks
Jim
__________________
Advertisement

jclays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2013, 11:57 PM   #2
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,986
Quote:
Originally Posted by jclays View Post
Hello to everyone. I will be posting this thread to the various makes of trawlers please forgive the redundancies. I am interested in a trawler before I retire in the next couple of years. I've been looking at trawlers for a couple of years and have a good idea of what I am looking at. Currently have a 1966 Californian express cruiser. One of the first models made by Julies Marshall. Partial to his trawler especially the 38ft LRC. My main question on trawlers is performance. Im used to twin screws. A large percentage of the Trawlers I have seen on the market here in So California are Single screws. A few owners I've talked to prefer single screws in their trawlers. Is there and advantage? What are the speed differences between a single screw and a twin screw trawler? I would like to cruise at aprox 10 knots. I am looking in the 38ft range. Mid 70's to 1990 range in age. Lots of Leman 120's and Perkins used in these trawlers. What is an acceptable amount of hours on these engines. I am familiar with gas engines. Is there much diffrence between the Chinese/Taiwanese makes? They are very similar.
Thanks
Jim
Wow, Jim - seems you have fairly good background for getting into trawler ownership. There are hundreds of answers to your questions you can easily locate by using TF search feature. I recommend you spend some time searching archives with words and short questions. You can learn some real good pointers.

Happy Trawler Search Daze! - Art
__________________

Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2013, 10:29 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
City: Tampa, FL
Country: USA
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 246
I don't know a lot about trawlers myself (still learning), but one thing I do know is that to cruise at 10 knots you are either going to need a fairly long water line (55+ feet), or you are going to have to exceed hull speed. If you exceed hull speed then your fuel consumption goes up dramatically and, of course, that means you can't have a "full displacement" hull.
denverd0n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2013, 03:34 PM   #4
Guru
 
healhustler's Avatar
 
City: Longboat Key, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bucky
Vessel Model: Krogen Manatee 36 North Sea
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 4,181
denverdOn is right For 10 knots you'd be cranking pretty hard on most 38 footers. You'd have to go with a power-cat or settle for a semi-planing mono-hull with greater fuel consumption. If you could be satisfied with 7.5-8 knots, that would open up a world of options, and also make singles engines more practical. Twins are mostly (but not always) pretty exposed below with no protective keel or skeg. Singles are often (but not always) keel and skeg protected on trawler style boats. All things being equal (Captain's skill and boat familiarity), twin engines have a handling advantage, and also the redundancy feature in case of a non-fuel related engine failure, but there's also twice as much to maintain. As suggested, the forum search feature will pull up plenty of other feedback, especially on the eternal debate of twins vs. singles.
__________________
Larry

"I'd rather be happy than dignified".
healhustler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2013, 04:10 PM   #5
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,265
If you're satisfied cruising at 6 to 8 knots, a single propeller is sufficient unless you believe a second engine and propeller is necessary in case of single-engine failure. Single-propellered boats generally have better underwater protection. If you need speed and redundance, go twin. (That's not what I did, and so far without regret.)
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012