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Old 08-24-2015, 10:02 PM   #41
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Don't know what the norm is in Sydney but in our near-2,000 boat marina probably 90 percent of the boats, power and sail, go bow first into their slips. Among the several advantages to this is there are no visibility issues to deal with when entering the slip.
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Old 08-24-2015, 10:13 PM   #42
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Don't know what the norm is in Sydney but in our near-2,000 boat marina probably 90 percent of the boats, power and sail, go bow first into their slips. Among the several advantages to this is there are no visibility issues to deal with when entering the slip.
In Sydney, our norm is the reverse of yours, maybe less so with sailboats(on which we diverge and call yachts); in Queensland state there is more "bow in". We have a side finger but not all slips do, that could be a reason.
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Old 08-24-2015, 10:26 PM   #43
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So many boats are backed up between boats on either side of them to a dock, what some people call Mediterranean style?

Here in virtually every harbor I've been in boats are either in slips, usually two boats to a slip with a finger on their port or starboard side, or they are side-tied to a linear dock. Some marinas have the boats in individual slips with a finger on each side of the boat. In our harbor the docks all have two-boat slips along their length with a long side-tie dock or finger if you like at the end which is referred to as an "end tie."

The boat in the photo is on the end-tie of our dock with the two-boat slips along both sides of the main dock leading up to it.
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Old 08-25-2015, 03:05 AM   #44
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Our slips vary.(We call it berth or pen, while I`m at it, we call hauling out "slipping". Eg. of usage in a phone conversation:"We`re slipping the boat this weekend, got time to come help sand the hull and repaint the antifouling? Hello hello? seems the phone line dropped out..").
If it is essentially a stern tie to a long finger wharf, usually floating, there would be poles forward either side as well, these are usually found on older style marinas. Most slips are like ours, two boats, each has a finger one side, tie on the side and stern.
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Old 08-25-2015, 08:05 AM   #45
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On the US east coast, and in California, 90% + of the boats are backed in; many are set up that way from the factory with shorepower and water and dock access from the cockpit. On the Hatteras, we were part of the 10%, not only was the boat set up for it, we liked the privacy and view to the fairway; waking hours mostly on the aft deck, and an aft MSR. The only time we backed in was rare places with no finger piers. I never did it single handed.
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Old 08-25-2015, 09:30 AM   #46
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in California, 90% + of the boats are backed in

Really George, where?

Far more than 90% + pull in everywhere I have been in Northern and Southern California. The boats that back in stand out and are quite noticeable.
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Old 08-25-2015, 10:13 AM   #47
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Yep, East coast 90% back in. It is probably due to most marinas having short finger piers.



Is that you, George?
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Old 08-25-2015, 10:37 AM   #48
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Really George, where?

Far more than 90% + pull in everywhere I have been in Northern and Southern California. The boats that back in stand out and are quite noticeable.
Agreed - here in the SF Bay area, at least, I used to be the odd one out with my sailboat backed into its slip. With my Krogen I go in forwards because the view is better from the saloon that way round (I'm at the end of my marina and have no boats behind me).

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Old 08-25-2015, 10:41 AM   #49
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In my west coast experience, it is much closer to 50-50, but I would say most boats go bow in. I believe powerboats back in more frequently than sailboats, especially sportfishers and other open-cockpit powerboats. But, where slips are narrower at the front, a powerboat cannot back in as far as it can head in. Where slips are expensive, and permissible overhang limited, powerboats are more inclined to back in. I usually go bow-in for this reason, but when the slip permits, I go stern in, especially if my transom will go beyond the dock, since it is easiest to board my boat from the transom.
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Old 08-25-2015, 10:54 AM   #50
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Really George, where?

Far more than 90% + pull in everywhere I have been in Northern and Southern California. The boats that back in stand out and are quite noticeable.
Ok, I apologize; make that about 30% for power boats, just did a satellite scan of a few majors; been awhile I guess; too much time on the east coast ! Last place we used a lot out there, where we rented boats as part of a club, you had to back in, that probably colored my memory. Appears that different marinas are dominantly one or the other.
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Old 08-25-2015, 11:07 AM   #51
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Yep, East coast 90% back in. It is probably due to most marinas having short finger piers.



Is that you, George?
Nope, this is me, next to a puny little Fleming 55:



Here's a view from the bow of my boat in Morehead City after all my sporty neighbors got back in from a tournament. And no they don't leave the power cords in the water all the time; washing the boat comes first.

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Old 08-25-2015, 11:17 AM   #52
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I feel lucky and spoiled. All our slips have full length finger piers on both sides. I usually go bow in but will turn it around on occasion; I think this was a marina dock party.
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Old 08-25-2015, 11:17 AM   #53
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Not saying it's representative or anything, but my observation is that the more social owners are stern first - it drives them nuts hanging out on their aft decks / cockpits when people are passing by on the docks.
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Old 08-25-2015, 11:54 AM   #54
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I think much of it has evolved over time. On lakes it was all forward in as I grew up. However, the slips were angled from both sides in the front making them much smaller at the bow. It was impractical to back in. Also, they all had full length docks on both sides. I was amazed when traveling the west coast to notice places like Marina Del Ray even with the huge volume of boats and the shortage of space that way. In South Florida, a marina designer would look at that and quickly state how much money could be saved in construction and how many more boats slipped in if you just had finger piers and just had them on one side. Take it to the extreme in the med and have no piers.

Another couple of factors I think play a role. Bow in often obstructs your walkway, especially with larger and larger bow pulpits. Stern in, every boat is equal, there are no obstructions. Obviously if you don't have full length piers on the side, stern in becomes necessary for boarding, unboarding and provisioning.

One other point I've heard made. Think of the aft as the patio or yard, while the bow of the boat often has sleeping quarters or bedrooms. Well, while bow in provides more privacy when on the aft deck, it provides less when sleeping.

I personally hate all the east coast marinas with two boats to a slip. i feel like my privacy has been invaded. Even just a 3' or 4' dock between at least gives me some sense of separation. If I lived at a marina that would become very important in my selection. As a transient, I feel like one has it made. Side docking, generally very wide dock. Generally no other boat on either side, just in front of you and behind you and most of the time they're turned the same direction you are.

Many marinas in South Florida, there is no choice. All the Dania marinas are stern in only. You look at Harbour Towne and Port Royal and for all pratical purposes you've got med mooring. They don't have finger piers, more like fingerlings. The only exception is a few small sail boats bow in at the entrance to Port Royale.

Another huge difference in areas. In certain areas in the Delta and the PNW you see covered slips. Very very few covered in South Florida. On the lake I grew up on they were once mostly covered but the new haven't been. In fact now it's hard to get permits for covered slips.

Which brings us to the Chesapeake and another trend developing. I was talking to people in the Annapolis area. Very difficult for homeowners to get dock permits and they're very limited in the amount of water surface you can cover. This is to protect what is under.

Oh and for the record I hate Med Mooring. If given a choice, I'll always select a different marina. Only a couple of times have I had no choice.
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Old 08-25-2015, 12:31 PM   #55
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This is a shot of our slip which is typical of almost all the harbors in this region. The individual fingers are 45' long. I took this the day we moved our boat back to the new dock which, along with the next dock out, replaced the old ones. We were the first boat onto the new docks, hence the empty look. Both docks are totally full now.

The prevailing wind blows us off the finger, hence our permanent spring line hung on the dock, a practice used by quite a few people in the harbor.
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Old 08-25-2015, 12:34 PM   #56
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Bow in often obstructs your walkway, especially with larger and larger bow pulpits. Stern in, every boat is equal, there are no obstructions..
If your pulpit overhangs the walkway, your slip could be too short. It will most likely hang too far into the fairway if stern in and in either case, someone will hit it one day.

[/QUOTE]Think of the aft as the patio or yard.[/QUOTE]

I do think that and I'd rather have my patio on the waterfront than the sidewalk.

[/QUOTE]Oh and for the record I hate Med Mooring.[/QUOTE]

I'm with you there.
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Old 08-25-2015, 12:42 PM   #57
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Hawgwash-- If you eliminate the slash mark in the lead quote code the quoted section will appear properly in a box. Slash marks denote a closing code. Just a suggestion...
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Old 08-25-2015, 12:54 PM   #58
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...
Another couple of factors I think play a role. Bow in often obstructs your walkway, especially with larger and larger bow pulpits.
...
I don't have to worry about my bow pulpit overhanging the dock. Even an NBA player won't be able to bang their head. For the record I'm 6' tall.



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Old 08-25-2015, 12:56 PM   #59
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been awhile I guess; too much time on the east coast !



That's alright George, I'm sure a lot has changed. We allow women to vote now too.
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Old 08-25-2015, 01:22 PM   #60
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I'm jealous of those of you with full length docks! At my marina, we have an 8 foot "pinky" pier, every other slip. I think I would rather be bow in, if nothing else so I can fish off the back deck Kind tuff hoisting yourself over the bow railing getting on and off. . .

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For those of you suggesting lessons, can that be done before I buy a boat or do I wait till I get whatever and then chance it?
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