Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-04-2016, 05:10 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
GoneFarrell's Avatar
 
City: La Conner, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Imagine
Vessel Model: Farrell 34
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 141
Life on my trawler “Imagine,” the first year…

Been about a year since the “other woman” came into my life, my Farrell 34.

Looking back:

One of the best decisions I’ve made in some time, really fun, a lot of refurbishing work too! I am not complaining.

Plodding around at 7 or 8 knots is good for me, slows me down, gives me time to appreciate what’s going on around me, on the boat and on the water. Makes 10 to 12 knots through Deception Pass seem fast!

Planning ahead for the ebb and flow breaks me out of land routine, gets me back in phase with the outside world. No facebook on board my boat!

Hanging out in the harbor is good too, free show every day. Lots of coming and going. Almost everybody waves. Outside, everybody waves, there is no hazard from texting drivers!

Glad I got a flybridge boat, I like the big space feeling and ability to scope the waters 360 around, get warmed up by the sun.

Like others have said here, I spend more on food/drinks and just getting to/from the boat than I do on diesel. Maybe that will change next year when I wander farther afield, but doubt it. I can only burn so much fuel a day with an Isuzu DA120.

Went through almost every system on the boat, learned it, fixed this and that. So now I know the status of almost all my boat systems, how to fix them, where to get parts and so on. I like being able to fix things, now I can monitor the boat systems on board and do better preventative maintenance.

Stuff donated to Neptune:
BBQ brush, drill bits, Magma BBQ parts, countless screws, sanding blocks, scrapers, foam kneepads (got one back!), hose nozzle, silverware. Things have a way of bouncing on deck so they swish through the scuppers non-stop. I only drop things that sink, the wind blows away things that float.

Stuff I learned the hard way:
Windlass is most hazardous piece of power equipment on the boat (dingy O/B 2nd), it can hurt you and the boat if not maintained/used properly and safely. Sticky foot switches in the deck suck, changing over to radio remote control and better/safer procedures.

Chain doesn’t always flake down when you really wish it would! Made a small hoisting procedure change that fixed that.

Fuel filters like to clog when entering a harbor or trying to set an anchor in the wind. Glad I can switch over to filter B quickly. May add a simple fuel line neg pressure gauge to monitor this condition.

Engine bilge has high local gravity field (due to large mass of cast iron) that attracts all objects, a sort of marine black hole from which tools cannot be recovered. But screws and nuts are able to break free of the field and wedge themselves into a bilge pump switch float at night.

Using thrusters and jamming windlass at same time on a low battery is not gonna work, can blow a fuse that way. Thrusters are really nice to have, but you still have to have a plan B and capable hand at the helm if they go off line.

Raw water impellers are easy to replace at the dock, not so easy under way!

Stuff that makes me smile:
Good hands on board are worth their weight in rum! I can solo OK, but this is way more fun with good and capable hands of first mate and pals. Boat is big enough there’s room for all.

A small fish can get into a working raw water strainer, take the beating for a while, then swim back out when the engine is turned off!

Looking at the brightwork I spent a ton of time refinishing this summer. I am guilty of wood boat disease, gotta have my varnish fix! Boat can hold its own in Port Townsend, so I am happy.

The diesel really likes fresh engine oil, it just sounds happy to be splashing around in it!

Good food and grog tastes even better on board and with good company! BBQ and boats are a great combo. Liquor & beer disappears twice as fast on board vs. land.

Pollen/air pollution count is way low on the water, nose works better, I sleep better.

Modern chart plotting apps are really easy to use, great tool to have on board, but I will always cross-check that with dead reckoning my course, speed, depth and position.

Barry Farrell seems to have created a hull that works great when seas get choppy ahead.

Looking forward:

Want to get back into the local islands for spring shakedown cruises, then head north into BC boating grounds.

Float around with others here in Puget Sound and then up north along the inside passage.

Figure out what sort of fishing/shrimping tackle to put on board.

Better listing and stocking of spares, who to call for what.

Extend the USB power system and on-board wifi/bluetooth use. Minimize new wiring.

Continue changing out old bulbs to 2700K LEDs. Really brightens up the boat without being harsh on the eyes.

Improve the 12V house bank alternator/regulator, maybe rewind the alternator for more amps.

Thanks to all on this forum for your many thoughtful/useful posts on everything trawler. It’s really helped me make better choices and given me cross-checks to all manner of stuff hardware and procedure.

See you on the water somewhere between here and there!
__________________
Advertisement

GoneFarrell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2016, 05:17 PM   #2
TF Site Team
 
dwhatty's Avatar
 
City: Home Port: Buck's Harbor, Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Name: "Emily Anne"
Vessel Model: 2001 Island Gypsy 32 Europa (Hull #146)
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,676
You've got both the boat disease and the cure.
__________________

__________________
David Hawkins
Deer Isle, Maine
dwhatty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2016, 05:40 PM   #3
Guru
 
Steve's Avatar
 
City: Thibodaux, Louisiana
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Gumbo
Vessel Model: 2003 Monk 36
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,486
Welcome!
Copied from your post.
"Chain doesn’t always flake down when you really wish it would! Made a small hoisting procedure change that fixed that."

I'd like to hear more about that, a few times I have had a problem with chain piling in the locker, my chain was old and had some rust on it. Tomorrow the old chain goes out for the last time, and I'll be installing a new one.
__________________
Steve W.
http://mvgumbo.blogspot.com/
Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2016, 05:42 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
City: South East
Country: France
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 473
[QUOTE=GoneFarrell;485949]

Great post which in some part I could see as my own.
Fair winds & calm seas, the best is yet to come, just "Imagine" it.

P.
Pilou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2016, 06:01 PM   #5
Veteran Member
 
Todd R's Avatar
 
City: Wrightsville Beach
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Searching
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 34
Thanks GoneFarrell !!
This is why I read the Trawlerforum.
Todd
__________________
"Times Fun when you're having Flies"
Todd R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2016, 06:13 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
GoneFarrell's Avatar
 
City: La Conner, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Imagine
Vessel Model: Farrell 34
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve View Post
Welcome!
Copied from your post.
"Chain doesn’t always flake down when you really wish it would! Made a small hoisting procedure change that fixed that." I'd like to hear more about that,
If I just run the chain in without stopping, it will pile into a tall cone and not flake/lay down. Then it jambs up in the downpipe and on deck, which is dangerous to clear. Going to the chain locker in that situation is a PITA too, as the anchor is usually off the bottom and the boat is moving around.

So, now I retrieve chain in 5 to 8 foot runs, stop the winch, listen for the chain pile below to flake down. This works 90% of the time.

If it doesn't flake down: I put a boot on the gypsy to hold the chain in place and lift the returned chain on the locker side to cause it to flake down. I am very careful to keep the chain engaged on the wheel and my hand positioned such that if I screw up my hand will not be pulled into the wheel. And I wear leather gloves, mandatory.

Do not just grab the slack/piled chain, because if it comes off the wheel it can pull your hand into the wheel, very nasty!

I may shorten the downpipe to give more clearance over the pile of chain in the locker. You might check how much clearance you have from the bottom of the pipe to the pile of chain.
GoneFarrell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2016, 06:16 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
GoneFarrell's Avatar
 
City: La Conner, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Imagine
Vessel Model: Farrell 34
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilou View Post

Great post which in some part I could see as my own.
Fair winds & calm seas, the best is yet to come, just "Imagine" it.

P.
I can "imagine" Sanary, having worked a job or two in the Rousset valley, dining in Aix, and touring your local coast. You are a lucky lady!
GoneFarrell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2016, 07:30 PM   #8
Guru
 
78puget-trawler's Avatar
 
City: LaConner
Country: USA
Vessel Model: 34' CHB
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 783
Enjoyable post! Love the Neptune part. What we used to call "the float test".
78puget-trawler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2016, 08:46 PM   #9
Guru
 
Steve's Avatar
 
City: Thibodaux, Louisiana
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Gumbo
Vessel Model: 2003 Monk 36
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,486
That sounds good, I'm hoping my new chain will flow smoothly, no tall piles, if not I'll try your method. Around here we normally anchor in pretty shallow water, I'll try to really spread out the first 100 ft + of the new chain in the locker.
Thanks!
__________________
Steve W.
http://mvgumbo.blogspot.com/
Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2016, 06:21 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Blissboat's Avatar
 
City: Jacksonville Beach, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Shallow Minded
Vessel Model: Shoal Cat
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 369
A nice reflection on life with boats, GoneFarrell. Glowing and realistic, all at the same time. Thanks, and keep 'em coming.
Blissboat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2016, 07:11 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
City: South East
Country: France
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 473
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoneFarrell View Post
I can "imagine" Sanary, having worked a job or two in the Rousset valley, dining in Aix, and touring your local coast. You are a lucky lady!
Merci beaucoup, I appreciated your nice comment, I am always pleased that some people living far away have fond memories of their visit in my country with particular regards to my city and area. Rousset and Sainte Victoire are very nice, indeed close to Aix en Provence.

The beauty of these landscapes are reported to be the inspiration for Paul Cézanne whose composition and style came together to create beautiful paintings of one of the most world-famous art collections.

You are lucky as well, your area abounds with plenty of invaluable places to sailing and anchoring, starting with the stunning San Juan and Lopez islands.

P.
Pilou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2016, 09:15 AM   #12
Guru
 
City: Fort Myers
Country: USA
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 917
Great post, thanks for sharing!
Marlinmike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2016, 09:56 AM   #13
GFC
Guru
 
GFC's Avatar
 
City: Tri Cities, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Beachcomber
Vessel Model: Sea Ray 550 Sedan Bridge
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,503
What a great post to read early in the morning with a cup of hot coffee. Thanks for sharing your thoughts and ideas with us.
__________________
Mike and Tina
Beachcomber 1995 Sea Ray 550 Sedan Bridge
GFC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2016, 11:13 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
City: Rapid City, SD heading back to the PNW
Country: USA
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 121
Thanks for your post. It gives the Admiral and I a big push to work even harder to get back to the PNW and aboard a boat. This has been our dream for several years now, and we are almost there. Thanks again
mramoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2016, 09:59 PM   #15
Veteran Member
 
City: Mary Esther, FL
Country: USA
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlinmike View Post
Great post, thanks for sharing!

X2!
BlindHog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2016, 11:10 PM   #16
Veteran Member
 
City: La Conner / Yacolt, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Pagoo
Vessel Model: Campion 30
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 40
A good post. Which La Conner dock are you on?

Fred P...............
Fredp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2016, 12:38 AM   #17
TF Site Team
 
FlyWright's Avatar
 
City: California Delta and SF Bay
Country: Sacramento, CA, USA (boat in Vallejo)
Vessel Name: FlyWright
Vessel Model: Marshall Californian 34 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 9,757
Epic post, GoneFarrell. It made me smile, chuckle and laugh. Great summary of your yearlong adventure. Thanks for posting!

PS. I also choked up a little on the Magma parts going to Davy Jones' locker.
__________________
Al

Custom Google Trawler Forum Search
FlyWright is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2016, 09:02 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
GoneFarrell's Avatar
 
City: La Conner, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Imagine
Vessel Model: Farrell 34
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fredp View Post
A good post. Which La Conner dock are you on?

Fred P...............
J dock, Fred.
GoneFarrell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2016, 10:04 AM   #19
Guru
 
Lou_tribal's Avatar
 
City: Quebec
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Bleuvet
Vessel Model: Custom Built
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 1,474
Very nice post that remind my own feelings.
To wake up early morning at the anchor alone in a bay and listening to the only sound of birds is priceless. Where to find this except on boat!
By the way when working in the bilge I always tie my tools to my wrist with piece of string so I can bring it back up to light when testing the gravity effect

P.S: I am living in Canada for years now but I grown up not far from Aix. Indeed it is a very nice place!
Lou_tribal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2016, 10:07 AM   #20
FOG
Senior Member
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: DreamQuest
Vessel Model: Prairie 36
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by GFC View Post
What a great post to read early in the morning with a cup of hot coffee. Thanks for sharing your thoughts and ideas with us.
Ditto!
__________________

FOG is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012