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Old 08-27-2016, 11:49 PM   #21
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Let's talk about sunglasses

Pretty much all sunglasses are made by one of two Italian companies (Luxottica or Safilo) or one French company (Essilor).

That said, I prefer Maui Jim for plastic and Smith for glass. Only polarized, of course.

I still gots some old school Vaurenet and Julbos from my climbing days.

Agreed that some of the new safety glasses can give expensive sunglasses a go for their money. I wear Uvex safety glasses for much of the day with no eye strain. I wonder if they make polarized ones...
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Old 08-28-2016, 12:20 AM   #22
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I like those "as seen on TV" HD Wrap Arounds. I wear dime store low power readers for everyday use and stronger ones for up close and reading. The HD's fit right over whatever glasses I have on and do a real good job of cutting glare and like the ad says, they make colors pop and make it easier to distinguish colors better. Now I lost my last pair and replaced them with a cheap Fred Meyer clone and they work about the same, but the HD's really do work as advertised, and no I don't own stock in the company.
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Old 08-28-2016, 02:26 AM   #23
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I doubt any lens would help with how the OP sees some things, but Polaroids are my choice, preferably plastic, the weight of the glass in RayBans is uncomfortable if worn for extended periods. After very successful cataract surgery 2 years ago everything is bright again, and glare protection becomes important.
However, I have noticed some display screens, like railway indicator boards, appear blank viewed through polaroids. First time I thought the display had failed, then I realised the cause.
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Old 08-28-2016, 08:26 AM   #24
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Sunclouds. $50 at retail price, less on eBay. Polarized, lifetime warranty, no distortion. I go for the amber mirrored lenses.
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Old 08-28-2016, 09:38 AM   #25
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Polarized glasses will block many LCD display screens. If you tilt your head sideways you will see the difference.
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Old 08-28-2016, 11:31 AM   #26
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recently went to prescription polarized,as they are the best for your eyes.Is it just me,or do others have a tough time getting used to the polarization?
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Old 08-28-2016, 12:53 PM   #27
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recently went to prescription polarized,as they are the best for your eyes.Is it just me,or do others have a tough time getting used to the polarization?
My wife and practice polarization together... we're about to again... just as much of a blast in our 60's as in decades before! For us two anyway!!


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Old 08-29-2016, 12:39 PM   #28
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I have been really busy the last few days, so I will weigh in on this.

Disclaimer: While my professional training makes me an "expert" in this area, I do sell sunglasses, both prescription and non-prescription in my practice.

Polarized: Just remember what a plain polarized lens does. It simply blocks light that is vibrating in that plane. Light from the sun or other light sources is not polarized. However, reflected light is plain polarized. Lenses that are polarized are oriented to block light that is polarized by reflecting off a horizontal service. So this generally works great for light that is reflected off water or snow. Polarized lenses are a laminate of two pieces of lens material with a plastic polarized film sandwiched in between. The lens material can be plastic or glass. Be careful, some LCD displays will not be seen while wearing polarized lenses as an LCD is polarized so the display will blank out depending on the orientation.

Eye protection: It is a good idea to protect your eyes from the sun just as you would your skin. UV radiation is the problem and has been correlated with earlier onset of cataracts and the development of macular degeneration. For this reason, it is a good idea to wear a hat and use sunglasses. For this purpose, almost any pair of sunglasses that you buy from a reputable source will be just fine. If they are labeled as being 100% UVA and UVB absorptive, they likely are here in the US. I would avoid the $3.00 pair at the gas station checkout, and careful of off shore internet sources, but other than that the industry is pretty good these days about accurate labeling. Another option, for those of you who use photochromic lenses (Transitions) they are UV absorptive as well so will provide perfectly good protection.

Color: Gray is the color that will have the least impact on color perception and is what I recommend to my patients. However, pick a color you like, it really doesn't matter. If a blue, amber, green or brown lens makes you think you see better, go for it. A lot of research has been done on the use of yellow lenses in the shooting sports and with pilots. It is clear that pilots for example as a group prefer yellow lenses and will swear that it reduces fatigue, increases visual acuity etc... However, when actually tested, yellow provides no more increased performance than a neutral density filter in visual acuity or contrast sensitivity.

Glass vs Plastic: Pick what you like it doesn't matter. I would never go back to using glass lenses myself. Plastic lenses are much lighter in weight and therefore more comfortable to wear for an extended period. Modern plastic lenses are optically just as good as glass lenses (provided they are made well). Modern scratch coatings are almost as hard as glass. Plastic lenses provide less risk of shattering on impact.

Prescription Sunglasses: One of the nicest things you can do for yourself. Once you do, you will never want to be without them.

Photochromic (Transitions): These are the lenses that get darker or lighter depending on the amount of light. I actually love these and use them on all the glasses that I wear outside the office. They are 100% UV absorptive, convenient as you don't have to carry a sun Rx around. They do have disadvantages. Since they are UV sensitive, they will not get very dark inside a car where the windshield will block UV. The same thing can happen in the boat depending on the type of wind screen you have. The second issue is that while they darken quickly, they don't lighten up quickly, so going from a bright deck to a dark engine room for example could be an issue at times.

Cost: In many respects, you get what you pay for. Nothing wrong with cheap sunglasses since as mentioned above, the cheap ones will still provide good sun protection (the primary reason for wearing them). However, it is difficult to manufacture non-prescription plastic lenses without distortion. Cheap sunglasses are cheap because the frames are poor quality and their is less QC involved in the lenses. So with cheap sunglasses, you can randomly find very good, and very poor lenses even on the same pair of sunglasses. Higher quality (and higher cost) sunglasses have better QC so you are less likely to come across optical aberrations in the lenses.

For this group, which is made up of primarily old farts with plenty of disposable income, there is no excuse to not get yourself some good quality prescription sunwear. Simply put, if you are 45 years old or older, you cannot see clearly both in distance and near. Many men in particular try to fool themselves into believing they can, but it is self delusion. By the time you are 50, you are seriously impaired in your ability to read a chart or display clearly. Time to invest in some multi-focal lenses to wear generally, and consider prescription sunglasses with both the near and distance prescription.
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Old 08-29-2016, 12:50 PM   #29
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Without questioning your professionalism doc, what do you consider seriously degraded vision past 50?

If the eye test for DOT physicals says 20/20...they don't seem too concerned abut my age. I can read charts fine. But some of that as you explained before is the difference between sight snd vision. Much of the time people hand me stuff to read the fine print, whether they are old, young, glasses or not.

What specifics should I be looking for to signal it's time for optical assistance?

Might have to get closer on a few items during daylight....it's night vision that I saw evaporate quickly when flying.
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Old 08-29-2016, 12:55 PM   #30
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Thanks guys for weighing in on this and I really appreciate Dhayes what being a pro guiding me/us. I will add that I have had the silicone eye implants, the crystal lens type about 8 years ago and yes...I am a big fan. Almost 20/20 since then.

Therefore I wear non prescription sunglasses. I think I am currently running a bit dark with my Costas, and I need to get some more glasses that are a bit lighter. That being said, I appreciate the guidance.
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Old 08-29-2016, 01:18 PM   #31
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Without questioning your professionalism doc, what do you consider seriously degraded vision past 50?

If the eye test for DOT physicals says 20/20...they don't seem too concerned abut my age. I can read charts fine. But some of that as you explained before is the difference between sight snd vision. Much of the time people hand me stuff to read the fine print, whether they are old, young, glasses or not.

What specifics should I be looking for to signal it's time for optical assistance?

Might have to get closer on a few items during daylight....it's night vision that I saw evaporate quickly when flying.
You certainly may be able to see great in the distance without correction. However, you can not see as clearly at a reading distance. The lens of the age continues to grow and becomes less flexible. This process starts when we are little kids and finally catches up to us in our 40's. This same process eventually results in the lens becoming less clear (cataracts). No way, short of dying young, to avoid it.

So, physics dictates that a 50 year old eye cannot focus both at infinity and at a reading distance (typically 40cm). Now, some can "get by". In bright light our pupils constrict increasing the depth of field. Some patients can get by pretty well in daylight if they have a bit of myopia that gives them a help at near and small pupils that help with the distance. But "getting by" is not the same as seeing clearly. Nothing wrong with it, we just shouldn't fool ourselves.

We might get by with a dirty bottom and running gear, but we shouldn't fool ourselves into thinking our boat is performing up to its potential.
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Old 08-29-2016, 01:21 PM   #32
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Thanks guys for weighing in on this and I really appreciate Dhayes what being a pro guiding me/us. I will add that I have had the silicone eye implants, the crystal lens type about 8 years ago and yes...I am a big fan. Almost 20/20 since then.

Therefore I wear non prescription sunglasses. I think I am currently running a bit dark with my Costas, and I need to get some more glasses that are a bit lighter. That being said, I appreciate the guidance.
Are you talking about an intra ocular lens implant after cataract surgery? Or are you talking about one of the intra corneal implants used as a refractive surgery?
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Old 08-29-2016, 01:41 PM   #33
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Without questioning your professionalism doc, what do you consider seriously degraded vision past 50?

If the eye test for DOT physicals says 20/20...they don't seem too concerned abut my age. I can read charts fine. But some of that as you explained before is the difference between sight snd vision. Much of the time people hand me stuff to read the fine print, whether they are old, young, glasses or not.

What specifics should I be looking for to signal it's time for optical assistance?

Might have to get closer on a few items during daylight....it's night vision that I saw evaporate quickly when flying.

I always passed the DOT with 20/20 both near and far when in reality my near vision is 20/30 in my port eye and and 20/55 in my starboard eye. Far vision being 20/50 in my left and 20/20 in my right eye.😊

Not hard to fudge the simple stand behind the line and cover one eye test.
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Old 08-29-2016, 01:55 PM   #34
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I have been really busy the last few days, so I will weigh in on this.............................................. .........
Thanks Dave. A great post!
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Old 08-29-2016, 02:10 PM   #35
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Thank you Dave for your professional insight in posts 28 and 31. Best posts on this thread.
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Old 08-29-2016, 02:18 PM   #36
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I always passed the DOT with 20/20 both near and far when in reality my near vision is 20/30 in my port eye and and 20/55 in my starboard eye. Far vision being 20/50 in my left and 20/20 in my right eye.😊

Not hard to fudge the simple stand behind the line and cover one eye test.

Yeah, that is another way to do it, mono vision. Works fine but be aware that it gives you less than ideal depth perception and less than ideal distance and near visual acuity. It can be good enough however. And as was discussed in another thread, you can do better than many with what you have since you know how to use it.
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Old 08-29-2016, 02:46 PM   #37
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Inter ocular after cataract surgery
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Old 08-29-2016, 03:10 PM   #38
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Your absolutely correct on the mono vision Dave. I broke down a few years ago and have both progressive regular and sunglasses. Best decision I made in years, especially the sunglasses. When we went for our eye exams earlier this year I talked my wife into a pair of good progressive sunglasses and she loves having them. The amount of time we spend on the water it's hard to believe we lived with out them for as long as we did.

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Old 08-29-2016, 03:14 PM   #39
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Another thanks here Dave. Not to mention it appears I have been making right choices through luck. I do have to say I hate wearing sunglasses anywhere but on the water. Once off the beach and off the boat (or inside the boat) off those suckers go.

Straps on all my glasses are must have when boating as anything not tied down I have a propensity to float test at any moment. I took to wearing both the shades and and clear on their respective straps when cruising; made it easier to go back inside or the darker reaches of the boat. Easier to see a cell phone screen or glossy computer screen with the clears, the big matte screens we had for our navigation system seemed OK.
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Old 08-29-2016, 04:43 PM   #40
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Inter ocular after cataract surgery
yeah, very cool. I try to explain to patients how much better they will see after cataract surgery, but they never really understand until after they do it. Usually they make two comments when I see them for their 1-day post-op visit. 1, They can't believe how bright and vivid the colors are and 2, they don't know why they waited so long to do it.
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