Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-29-2017, 12:40 PM   #1
Veteran Member
 
City: Portland
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 40 Sport Sedan
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 47
Leaving this dock - How would you do it?

I have a single screw boat and am looking for ideas on how best to leave the docking scenario in the picture below. It's a long fairway with a short 90 degree leg at the end. LH prop, no thrusters, and single handing (so any spring line placement from any cleat but the midship cleat is difficult).

The only thing I can come up with is the following:
Hard starboard rudder with quick burst of power to get the stern kicking over to port. Then back down as far as I can (less than a full boat length). Then keep doing back & fill clockwise for 270 degrees until my bow is pointed to the left in the picture.

Any other ideas? What if the boat in front of me wasn't there and I could pull forward more, would that give me better options?

__________________
Advertisement

__________________
_____________
Rob
GreySky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2017, 12:53 PM   #2
Guru
 
Cigatoo's Avatar
 
City: Narragansett Bay
Country: New England
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 36
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 675
Exactly right but......back all of the way out. You will have much more control / ability to maneuver while backing. Especially if wind and or current is present.
__________________

Cigatoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2017, 01:30 PM   #3
Guru
 
City: Between Oregon and Alaska
Country: US
Vessel Name: Charlie Harper
Vessel Model: Wheeler Shipyard 83'
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 1,435
Easting is Exactly right. The only change I would make is using a spring line to get the stern over quicker.
Lepke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2017, 01:32 PM   #4
TF Site Team
 
Bay Pelican's Avatar
 
City: Chicago, IL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bay Pelican
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,994
Don't know if this will work with a LH prop depends on the amount of the walk. If a fender on the starboard bow and wheel all the way to starboard I would pull forward kicking the stern to port. Then I would back as far as possible while turning the wheel to port. Then pull forward behind the two docked boats. Then back and fill to turn the bow 90 degrees to port so you can pull forward.

I have done this several times with Bay Pelican but she has a RH prop.
__________________
Marty
Bay Pelican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2017, 01:51 PM   #5
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 7,673
The other option if your stern walks to Starboard in reverse is back into the slip.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2017, 03:14 PM   #6
Guru
 
City: gulf coast
Country: pinellas
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 2,712
Agree with above comments. If you have a big enough rudder there is a fair amount of control when backing with enough speed. Not knowing the ple situation I wonder if it would be easier if the boat faced the opposite direction.
bayview is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2017, 03:35 PM   #7
Veteran Member
 
City: Portland
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 40 Sport Sedan
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 47
Thanks all for the feedback.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bay Pelican View Post
Don't know if this will work with a LH prop depends on the amount of the walk. If a fender on the starboard bow and wheel all the way to starboard I would pull forward kicking the stern to port. Then I would back as far as possible while turning the wheel to port. Then pull forward behind the two docked boats. Then back and fill to turn the bow 90 degrees to port so you can pull forward.
This is pretty much the maneuver I tried to describe in my post with the exception of back/fill counter-clockwise vs clockwise.

As far as backing the entire way out goes, I'm not at that comfort level yet. It's a relatively long fairway oriented 90 degrees to the Columbia River flow so you get moved sideways quite a bit. I don't have much prop walk and the rudder does very little against the current at the speeds I'm comfortable going near other peoples boats/property. I guess I know where I need more practice. Thanks.
__________________
_____________
Rob
GreySky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2017, 04:00 PM   #8
Guru
 
Cigatoo's Avatar
 
City: Narragansett Bay
Country: New England
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 36
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 675
Don't count on the rudder when backing. I do the following all of the time with current and or wind.

Let's say that while backing you have a current that wants to push your boat to port. While backing, Turn your wheel all the way to port and kick the boat into forward...just a short pulse. No throttle!!!!!That will swing the stern to stbd. Then continue backing. The whole idea is to swing the stern in the direction that you want to go and drag the bow behind you. You are not using the rudder to steer but combining it with the prop thrust to point the stern in the direction that you want to go. With this procedure you will learn to back the boat pretty much anywhere you want to go.

Get up early get out of the slip and practice where you have room and there is no one around to distract you.

If you want to go forward you are talking to the wrong guy
__________________

Cigatoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:47 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012