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Old 12-11-2010, 11:17 AM   #21
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RE: Learning about fiberglass fabrication?

I too, am perplexed about this. *Coating technology has become as reliable and durable as a lot of gel-coat re-dos. *Gel-coat still may have an edge in life from the factory, but how many of us use our boats in a chipless, wearless environment. *When it comes time to do the hull, I'm going with the best paint I can afford over the best prep I can do.
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Old 12-11-2010, 11:46 AM   #22
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RE: Learning about fiberglass fabrication?

Quote:
SeaHorse II wrote:


My own boat has a painted hull and is now* entering its 7th year. (Still looks great
SeaHorse, Walt In my opinion you have one of the nicest boats on the forum. Clean sexy and always looking Bristol. *I wish I could keep my boat so nice. What brand of paint was used?

SD

*
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Old 12-11-2010, 12:35 PM   #23
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Learning about fiberglass fabrication?

Of course there is a flip side to this topic. Our boat was 25 years old when we bought it. It had spent its entire life under various names baking in the sun in San Francisco Bay until we came along. Fiberglass boats like Grand Banks in the early 70s tended to be overbuilt. In the case of American Marine they switched from wood to fiberglass in '73 and they were not shy about the layers of glass they put into their hulls since the material was new to them and they felt that safe was better than sorry.

But gelcoat was new to them, too, and while their hulls, particularly the early ones like ours, are built like tanks, the gelcoat was another matter. I've been told early gelcoat was not as tough as later formulas and the manufacturers were still finding out how to apply it, how thick it should be, and so on. Our boat's gelcoat has taken quite a beating. In addition to the expected eggshellng of much of the surface, there are all sorts of chips, dings, thin spots, scrapes, etc.

We'd love to throw twenty or thirty thousand at the boat and take it up to Vancouver and have the whole boat properly prepped and painted. We actively started investigating this not long after buying the boat, and then we met a fellow who caused us to think again.

This guy was selling his deceased father's yacht, a seventy or eighty footer that had been hit by a small freighter and been completely repaired by Delta Marine, the super-yacht manufacturer located on the Duwamish Waterway in Seattle. Part of the rebuild included an absolutely spectacular paint job, the best I have ever seen on any vessel, bar none.

I was on board the boat talking to the owner and mentioned our old GB and how much we'd love to have it painted like his boat had been. He laughed and said there are two ways to go. One is to have a beautiful paint job put on and then spend the rest of your days terrified that you or somebody else will scratch it. His recommendation was the second way--- leave the boat the way it is, scratches, dings, and all, and just enjoy it without the ever-present fear that you'll get it dirty, scuffed, or dinged.

While we would still love to have the boat painted, from that moment on we have not had any heartburn over the exterior finish on our boat. It's almost 38 years old now, looks it, and that's just the way it is. We wax it from time to time, but like the helicopter pilot at the TV station I used to work at said about the station's crappy, cheap helicopter that fell out of the sky on a regular basis, "You can only polish a turd so much."

If we ever find $30k lying in a gutter somewhere, sure, we'll send the boat north and have a nice paint job put on it. But if that day never comes, we'll just continue to enjoy the boat minus the ever-present worry about the finish.

We may someday try painting it ourselves, starting with a small area like the forward cabin exterior, just because we think it would be an interesting thing to attempt. But it's right down at the bottom of the "to do" list.



-- Edited by Marin on Saturday 11th of December 2010 01:40:50 PM
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Old 12-11-2010, 12:51 PM   #24
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RE: Learning about fiberglass fabrication?

Quote:
skipperdude wrote:

*
What brand of paint was used?



*
The boat was made by Selene and the papers with it say the paint is "Cook
Epoxy."

After many attempts to contact Selene, Halvorsen, dealers and the Cook Paint
Company, I have come up empty handed. Nobody writes or calls back.
For these reasons, I would never recommend someone buy a new Halvorsen
(Island Gypsy). The irony, however, is that I love the boat!


(Hopefully one of the above mentioned will read this missile and stoke the
customer service fire.)


*
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Old 12-11-2010, 12:51 PM   #25
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Learning about fiberglass fabrication?

Point well taken, Marin, and scratch or chip paranoia is exactly what I'd have if my boat was one of those incredibly pristine examples. *Fact is, I can't own such a vehicle, boat or otherwise. *The stress is too much for me, and maybe the amount of work that such a boat deserves to keep it looking its best is too much for me too. *I'm doing a stripe change to "Bucky" right now to match the new Navy canvas, but the amount of glass work to the upper and lower stripe area is way more than I ever expected. *I felt that if I didn't do it now, I never would. *I think I'll have to leave the really pristine boats to those who have the money to care for it or those who's enjoyment of boats include all the work to keep it that way. *The Halvorsen Gormet 32, by the way, is one of those boats that really deserve that kind of care, and is probably why I don't have one.

-- Edited by healhustler on Saturday 11th of December 2010 01:53:43 PM
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Old 12-11-2010, 05:36 PM   #26
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Learning about fiberglass fabrication?

*I have rolled and tip the exterior several times and*repaired hundred of bang/scraps.* 95% of the work is in the prep and prime.* The pretty gloss coat is applied just heavy enough *to cover the dull primer.* Its the primer that actually protects the boat.** This summer I rolled and tip the starboard salon and bridge.* First time had a couple runs, so lightly sand and repainted.* When we pull I will roll and tip the hull below the rub rail.* The final pretty gloss coat will take about 4 hours.* Not a big job once you get the hang of it.
*
Some with epoxy the scratches/dings as it sort of like plastering.* If you dont like it sand it down/of and apply a new coat. The trick is using the right additive for the application, how thin/thick and how fast to dry.* I use the fast dry most of the time, 404 additive for most application and 407 for faring as its*easy to sand.** Epoxy and or rolling tipping is not that hard.* If you screw up then sand it down and do over.* Its not like is a one shot deal.*

I use Brightside as is cheap, last a long time, easy to apply and match.* I use cheap throw away everything, gloves, paint brushes, containers, paper towels and no clean up.* Let us know when you get into a project as we can walk you through it.*


-- Edited by Phil Fill on Saturday 11th of December 2010 06:38:37 PM
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Old 12-12-2010, 05:45 AM   #27
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RE: Learning about fiberglass fabrication?

"Paint Sells Da Boat,"

So paint it when you are selling , IF you think its worth the price.

As a cruiser ,fantastic paint is our LAST priority.
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Old 12-12-2010, 07:44 AM   #28
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RE: Learning about fiberglass fabrication?

A good place to for videos is MAS epoxies web site. I used MAS epoxy when I rebuilt my two sailboats. Their system is easy to use and does not create the blush that other epoxies do. I would also like to build a radio console for my Defever 40s flybridge and I will watch youtube for ideas when it comes time. There are a lot of ideas on youtub. One last thing, I rolled and tipped two part poly paint on both of my boats. It was tricky but it worked out.
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Old 12-13-2010, 07:44 AM   #29
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Learning about fiberglass fabrication?

goodness- I just checked out that link to the plasticclassic forum. Check out this thread there:
http://plasticclassicforum.com/viewt...hp?f=37&t=4431

If I EVER feel like I have a lot of work to do on my boat I am going to go back and read that thread- HOLY COW! I got exhausted and covered and fiberglass dust just reading that thread!!!

We're having the topsides painted on our trawler as soon as I can actually find time to bring her down the river to the yard that will do it. I had hoped to do it this week but too much going on so it's looking to be after the holidays now.

-- Edited by Woodsong on Monday 13th of December 2010 08:45:25 AM
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Old 12-13-2010, 12:10 PM   #30
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RE: Learning about fiberglass fabrication?

I was told that Hatteras has been painting there boats for years .
No gel*coat.

SD
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Old 12-13-2010, 03:15 PM   #31
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RE: Learning about fiberglass fabrication?

Quote:
skipperdude wrote:

I was told that Hatteras has been painting there boats for years .
No gel*coat.

SD
I had a slip next to the Hatteras factory coastal slip at Morehead City.* Over the five years that I was there, I got to know the crews that sea tested their boats.* They told me that Hatteras did put a dark gelcoat in the mold.* Then they painted with Imron over the dark gelcoat.* They used the dark gelcoat to show the thin spots when they sprayed the Imron.* As far as I know all Hatteras boats were painted.

There were alot of advantages to having my slip------especially at fishing tournament time.* They supplied me with expensive rigged baits flown in from Ft. Lauderdale.

*
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Old 12-14-2010, 01:49 PM   #32
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RE: Learning about fiberglass fabrication?

Quote:
Forkliftt wrote:

Question- why do you never hear of someone spraying a new gelcoat over existing fiberglass?
Never heard of that but I have used gelcoat as a paint. Add hardener and a surfacing agent ( a Sort of wax) to the gelcoat then tip and roll as you would paint. It is not perfect because you have to match the color as UV fades the original.

If you are using it for a new application or add on *it should work fine.

SD
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Old 12-15-2010, 04:43 AM   #33
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RE: Learning about fiberglass fabrication?

Gelcoat is very useful for the boat lay up folks, and if done properly (surfacing tissue) will not shrink in time, and show the underlayers.

It takes less skill and preparation to gel coat than paint a boat.

The best Euro boats are not coated , they are cured inside the mold with huge banks of lights.

For a cruiser the ability to touch up paint is worthwhile.
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Old 12-15-2010, 02:28 PM   #34
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RE: Learning about fiberglass fabrication?

Quote:
Forkliftt wrote:

Question- why do you never hear of someone spraying a new gelcoat over existing fiberglass?
We have a 1965 model Boston Whaler.* It has been in our family for years.* My sons learned to ski and operate a boat on it.* Now my grandsons are.* We have redone it a couple of times.* Last time we turned the hull over, repaired all the dings, and applied new gelcoat.* Boston Whaler supplied the original decals for it.* The wood is varnished. It has a recent Mercury 90 hp 4 stroke, and shows almost as new.* Gets attention

For fishing I have a 25' Blackfin with Cat diesel for power.* We have redone it.* The topside has new gelcoat and non-skid.* The deck wss epoxy painted with new non-skid.* We had the original decals to apply.

Good quality boats can last a long time.

*
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Old 12-15-2010, 04:14 PM   #35
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RE: Learning about fiberglass fabrication?

As a long time "woodie" owner, I became reasonably competent in all things maintenance on a wooden boat. Plank, frame and floor replacement, fastenings, sanding, fairing and painting, etc.

Now I have a Chlorox bottle and have several gelcoat and fibreglass repairs to do, which I do not know how to do and am reluctant to attempt for fear of botching the job. I am told its easier than what I have been doing in wood, but I guess its the fear of the unknown.

I took the helm door (that I just dropped and seriously damaged the outer gelcoat on while taking it off the boat so that I could refinish the interior wood) down to the local shipyard to be repaired. Their business is slow right now (as is mine and a lot of others) and the head fibreglass guy said they could do it but why not do it myself (they know me from 22 years of trucking our woodie back and forth to our house and doing minor jobs for us). He said he would show me how. And this from a company not known for its charitable nature?

So, I start Gelcoat Repair 101 tomorrow morning at 8am.
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