Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-15-2012, 01:08 AM   #81
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,265
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyWright View Post
If you need a long line, we should talk about my 80-90 footer. It's nylon and it's fairly stiff, but it works very well in this application. And since I do have a spare...
Yeah? ... My strategy would be to have both bow and stern lines doubled so I could release without approaching the mooring buoys.
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 01:18 AM   #82
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyWright View Post
I refuse to spend any more time down at to your level in an attempt to shed light on the fallacies and flaws of your heretic claims.
FINALLY! Thank God.
__________________

Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 01:58 AM   #83
TF Site Team
 
FlyWright's Avatar
 
City: California Delta and SF Bay
Country: Sacramento, CA, USA (boat in Vallejo)
Vessel Name: FlyWright
Vessel Model: Marshall Californian 34 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 10,195
Quote:
Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
Yeah? ... My strategy would be to have both bow and stern lines doubled so I could release without approaching the mooring buoys.
Sure...PM me. I'll make you an offer you can't refuse!!

Both lines doubled...that's the same as our strategy. It works great!!
FlyWright is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 03:01 AM   #84
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,576
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry H View Post
I would like to know what kind of moorings both FlyWright and Marin are talking about.

The Washington marine parks use a bouy with a metal pyramid on top of a tire float. The actual mooring attachment point is a ring at the end of a chain. The chain can slide thru a pipe in the center of the pyramid. If you can get hold of the ring with a boat hook or hand, you can pull up and the chain slides up thru the center of the float pyramid.

Marin, is this what you are referring to?
If your Parks had moorings with an attached line like ours, you easily capture the line with a boathook or anything similar, and we might have been spared unpleasant exchanges which risk losing the Forum valued members.

Fore and aft moorings were tried and abandoned here because of the unfair loads on attached vessels, though if that`s where I think it is in SF Bay guess it`s been done to best use short term space. BruceK
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 03:11 AM   #85
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceK View Post
If your Parks had moorings with an attached line like ours, you easily capture the line with a boathook or anything similar....
I don't know where the design of the park buoys up here originated. The marine park buoys in BC use pretty much the same configuration.

The only change that's been made to the Washington marine park buoys since we've been doing this kind of boating is the big double concrete block buoy anchors have all been replaced with screw anchors that hold the end of the buoy rode a few feet off the bottom. This was done to minimize the effect of chains and blocks dragging around on the bottom and digging up the eelgrass beds. (The old anchors consisted of a large concrete block that stayed put and a smaller block some ten or more feet away that acted sort of like a kellet to reduce the shock loads on the chains. So the smaller block could get dragged around on the bottom quite a bit over time.)
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 02:23 PM   #86
TF Site Team
 
Pineapple Girl's Avatar
 
City: San Mateo, CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Pineapple Girl II
Vessel Model: PT 35
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,165
Quote:
Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
Sounds a bit difficult except under ideal conditions. Of course it can be done. Still, this dinghy-less boater wouldn't mind some help at least for the first time. But first need to get another 100-foot-long line.
Mooring at Ayala cove IS a bit difficult except under ideal conditions no matter HOW you do it. Long lines help a lot. We were very lucky that a friend gave us two 200' lines in line bags (and an inverter, fenders, spare anchor and a bunch of other stuff!! VERY VERY lucky.).
__________________
-Jennifer
Pineapple Girl II 1984 PT 35
San Francisco Bay Area
www.pineapple-girl.blogspot.com
Pineapple Girl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 02:29 PM   #87
TF Site Team
 
Pineapple Girl's Avatar
 
City: San Mateo, CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Pineapple Girl II
Vessel Model: PT 35
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,165
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceK View Post
Fore and aft moorings were tried and abandoned here because of the unfair loads on attached vessels, though if that`s where I think it is in SF Bay guess it`s been done to best use short term space. BruceK
Yeah they are trying to pack 'em into a small space. It is really tight in there and not everyone knows the rules so they don't pick up the correct matching bouys (they are color coded) or worse, only pick up one at the bow. of course the park is underfunded so there is rarely a ranger out there to educate people.
__________________
-Jennifer
Pineapple Girl II 1984 PT 35
San Francisco Bay Area
www.pineapple-girl.blogspot.com
Pineapple Girl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 08:02 PM   #88
Guru
 
Anode's Avatar


 
City: Missourah
Country: USA
Vessel Name: M/V Scout
Vessel Model: Sundowner Tug 30'
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 645
Now I'm going to lay awake tonight worrying how to pick up my next mooring bouy.....
__________________
Chip

Deliveries & Yacht Services
www.captainchip.com
Anode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 09:00 PM   #89
Per
Guru
 
Per's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 613
great to get some new ideas from you guys here, just not sure where to keep all the gear and gadgets...

On Catalina Isl. mooring is much tighter than those shown in your photos.
They use both bow and stern mooring lines.
Basically you pick up the bow first, the mooring line is attached to a tall float buoy(which you can grab if the skipper gets you close enough) and there is a rope connecting to the stern mooring line.
So you pull in, attach the front quickly through the bow howse, secure to cleat, then pull the (connector) rope as you walk back toward the stern and then pull in the stern mooring line. And again, remember to get the line through the hawser hole!
Often times there is a wind pushing the stern away from the mooring line so you have to work swiftly.
First time we moored there the harbour master assisted us to get the lines.
Now we can do it ourselves but admiral is not excited to go out fishing since it means we have to pick up the lines again on our return.
Per is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2012, 10:56 PM   #90
Guru
 
Ocean Breeze NL's Avatar
 
City: Springdale, NL
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Ocean Breeze
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander 85OA38
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 530
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anode View Post
Now I'm going to lay awake tonight worrying how to pick up my next mooring bouy.....
I just hope my admiral is able to pick up my buoys in the morning!!!

Elwin
__________________
Elwin
Ocean Breeze NL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2012, 02:54 AM   #91
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,724
Marin,

On post # 4 why do you have an extra bow line and stern line?

Have'nt read the whole thread ....answer is post # ?
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2012, 04:26 AM   #92
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Quote:
Originally Posted by manyboats View Post
Marin,

On post # 4 why do you have an extra bow line and stern line?

Have'nt read the whole thread ....answer is post # ?
I guess you meant the photo. Bellingham gets some pretty strong winds in the winter. Gusts of a bit over 80 mph have been recorded by the weather station on top of the Bellingham Cold Storage ice house across the turning basin from our slip. Typical sustained winds in the storms are 40 to 60. Our slip puts our starboard rear quarter to the prevailing SW winds which we prefer to having our bow into them. So the boat is being blown into the slip and off our finger (which we also like).

The second bow line functions as another aft-running spring to help counter the force of the wind and act as a backup to the midships aft spring. The second stern line is actually the same stern line led back aboard from the dock cleat and fastened to the other stern cleat in that corner of the boat. So it's doubling the line that's resisting the full force of the wind.
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2012, 12:10 PM   #93
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,265
I recently began the practice of doubling the stern lines, mostly to avoid the need to coil the ends on the dock.
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2012, 12:38 PM   #94
Veteran Member
 
MauleOne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 58
Docking

My wife and I have had great and scarry experiences bring in our boat.

The best one to date was when we were helping a friend move his 40 ft GB.

all was fine until the shift cable came disconnected from the transmission just as he was putting it up against the pier.

As he stood there with the useless shifter in his hand I realized what had happened and made the leap to the pier. My wife threw me a line and I secured it thuse keeping the boat from drifting out into traffic.

Of course that doesn't compare to the time I backed into our spot, my wife stepped off with a rope and I stepped off to help then realized that the boat was still in gear and on its way out of the slip and into traffic with no one on board. I prefer to hear my wife tell that story. It doesn't make me look good.
MauleOne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2014, 09:35 PM   #95
Veteran Member
 
AKMary's Avatar
 
City: Poulsbo
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Kingfisher
Vessel Model: 1974 Original Meridian Yachts Pilothouse 48
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 45
Marin - a follow-up question

Marin - I know this is an old post, but have you used the permanent spring line setup when you're running solo? If so, have you any additional tips to share? I like this idea but wonder how practical it would be when I single hand the boat, which is what I mostly do and also when it would be most helpful.
Thanks, Mary
AKMary is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2014, 11:26 PM   #96
Dauntless Award
 
Wxx3's Avatar
 
City: New York, NY
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Dauntless
Vessel Model: Kadey Krogen 42 - 148
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2,313
Quote:
Originally Posted by AKMary View Post
Marin - I know this is an old post, but have you used the permanent spring line setup when you're running solo? If so, have you any additional tips to share? I like this idea but wonder how practical it would be when I single hand the boat, which is what I mostly do and also when it would be most helpful.
Thanks, Mary
Actually Single handing, it is the only way to do it.
Pretty much as Marin described, when i am coming into any docking situation, i have the loop of my line over the cleat, with the bitter end coiled and over the cap rail, near the pilot house door.

As i pull into the dock, I pu the boat in neutral, (should you forget this step, no problem, everything is just speeded up 10 fold)
run out the pilot house, loop the line around the first fixed dock thing, I say dock thing, because at this point, I'm not picky.

Depending on the speed of the boat, current, wind, etc, I may have pulled the slack back thru the hawse pipe, but if I pressed for time, I just secure it over the cleat over the cap rail.

then, once I am tied to something, full rudder away from dock, and keep up the fwd momentum, so midships, then stern and bow are forced against dock.

At that point, I put the bow and stern line on, the priority being the line closest to the wind or current.

Then, once stopped and liking the position, I retied the midships into two spring lines, one fwd, one back.

Note, on a number of occasions, in strong current, if I put the boat in neutral, it will try to got perpendicular as much as it can. the only way to solve that is to keep boat in forward until all lines are tied.



and yes Marin is lurking, as only Marin can.
__________________
M/Y Dauntless, New York
a Kadey Krogen 42 Currently https://share.delorme.com/dauntless
Blog: https://dauntlessatsea.com
Find us: https://share.delorme.com/dauntless
Wxx3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 12:03 AM   #97
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,265
At my berth, the wind usually shoves the boat to starboard. I'm still practicing using hard-right rudder and bow thruster to move the Coot sideways to port (rudder moves stern to port, and the thruster compensates to maintain the boat's direction.)
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 01:36 AM   #98
Guru
 
Xsbank's Avatar
 
City: Pender Harbour, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Gwaii Haanas
Vessel Model: Vancouver Shipyards Custom Aluminum 52
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,451
That is apalling! I'd be afraid of getting fwapped with a piling like hitting a wasp with a flyswatter! One thing for sure, if you pooch it, you will be pinned against something!
__________________
Don't believe everything that you think.
Xsbank is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 01:54 AM   #99
TF Site Team
 
FlyWright's Avatar
 
City: California Delta and SF Bay
Country: Sacramento, CA, USA (boat in Vallejo)
Vessel Name: FlyWright
Vessel Model: Marshall Californian 34 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 10,195
Not appalling at all if it's done right. Slow is good.
__________________
Al

Custom Google Trawler Forum Search
FlyWright is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 07:10 AM   #100
Guru
 
Capt.Bill11's Avatar
 
City: Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 5,422
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyWright View Post
Not appalling at all if it's done right. Slow is good.
Exactly! That is just how you do it if you are single handling it. Or in fact even if you have help. Spring line first, pin it to the dock and tie on your other lines.
__________________

Capt.Bill11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012