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Old 09-28-2016, 12:49 PM   #21
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I got bit by the big boat "bug" at least 60 years ago and it never left. If you're living aboard and cruising, the bigger boat allows more comfort, storage for everything you own, decent appliances, huge food storage, better ride, walk in engine room, and more safety in bad weather.
If you cruise, you have more engine maintenance. It's nice to have the room of a stand up engine room and you can fit in almost all the noise making items in a sound proofed space. My generators are in an enclosures, inside the engine room, so make little noticeable noise. Outside I only hear the splash of exhaust water.
The only real down side to me is more expense. If I stayed in a marina it would be $1000 a month and day rates are about $80. Winter is at a private dock. Cruising I always anchor and have a faster shore boat for supplies. There's a lot to be said in favor of having a moat around your home.
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Old 09-28-2016, 01:11 PM   #22
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Look at a lot of boats. Spend significant time on them, walking sitting lying in the beds trying the showers studying the bridge and er.

If you haven't looked at 50 boats you aren't ready to make a decision about livability.

Then come back with questions on features and mechanicals. e.g. I wouldn't own V drives, too hard to acess.
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Old 09-28-2016, 01:37 PM   #23
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Do you have recommended resources about construction?
Is this about the hull, or the whole boat?
What boat would you recommend?
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Old 09-28-2016, 01:41 PM   #24
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Lepke.

Would you buy an older, but larger boat? I know the shape and maintenance records can decide this question, but is it a good idea to go big?
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Old 09-28-2016, 01:57 PM   #25
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I would love to look at more boats, if I could. Sometimes the distance, or time, is limiting this desire.
Also, brokers are not really happy to accommodate guys, who are just looking. I understand they work for money, too. So, I am not complaining. I just don't like the feel that I am wasting their time.
Boat shows are good sources, I know. There is only so many boats shows a year. So, far I did Anacortes Trawler and the Lake Union Float shows. Lot of beautiful boats, but not many older ones, which is my price bracket. Looking is fun and I enjoy it. I just don't like to be pushed into making offers.
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Old 09-28-2016, 02:26 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by utazo89 View Post
You are killing me with this puzzle! hehehe
Maybe I will go to Heaven, before I will know the answer to the ' anchor ' meaning.... lol
Just do a search on anchor threads here, and you'll see. No matter which one your boat comes with, it'll be the wrong shape, the wrong size, and too small. Paraphrasing Hop-Car


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Ladders are OK with me. Steps I try to avoid.

I don't want to switch to another boat 10 years from now, when I retire. I want to fix and learn everything I can. I have 8-10 years for this.
As another poster said, stairs can make it much easier to get to the bridge with a tray full of drinks and hors d'oeuvres. Or even one drink.

A thought about eventual switching: You'll learn a lot on your next boat. Part of that will be about maintenance and service and so forth, for that boat... but part of it will also be about how you like to use the boat, how well the layout suits you, how the various component systems suit you, what you might (come to) wish for, what might be "better" as your own thinking matures...

So I'd respectfully suggest you might want to think about this as a path or evolution, not as a single acquisition, one and done.

Might work out that way, of course. But then again...

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Old 09-28-2016, 10:07 PM   #27
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Here is one I visited recently. I liked the space inside and the accommodations. But when I looked the engines spaced between narrow walls and only access from the top, I was not convinced anymore. Tell me what do you think about maintenance on these engines in this type of ER? The engines are in two separate section, not together.

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I also asked the broker about the location, where was the boat built? Based on my readings, all the MT boats are made in Taiwan and imported by the company in NJ. But he insisted that it was build in NJ, so I did not question him.
Other thing I did not like is the lack of walk around deck and there is only one way to access the flybridge from inside, behind the helm.
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Old 09-29-2016, 01:00 PM   #28
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Definitely built in The Far East. Has all the hallmarks including the carved doors. Nice looking boat though. Except for the awful engine room spaces. Decent engines.


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Old 09-29-2016, 02:48 PM   #29
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From observation: Starting out on a 50' yacht will incur thumping, bumping and banging needing repairs of a more serious nature than if you start at (say for arguments sake) 30' or 36'.

Your desired deck plan (thrudeck) will mean generally more windage because of the higher sides. This will add to the bumps and bangs as you learn how to run the boat. Generally the heavier a boat is the more momentum it has to whack things in an unhelpful way.
Also the longer boat will have fewer selections for finding a slip.

Regarding what boat to buy, in addition to your 'useful' requirements the hull 'core' condition needs to be assessed. Water leaks into the hull core are VERY expensive to fix. Some (most) aren't worth repairing.

Nobody here can look at an internet ad and tell you 'that's a good deal'. Each boat has to be checked out.

Boats are like the singles bar. What you take home at night often isn't what you wake up with after you get them home and turn on the lights.
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Old 09-29-2016, 03:01 PM   #30
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Layout is not only a personal choice but IF you are considering living aboard, then it enters the realms of climate considerations.
Most boats are not designed to be a heated live-aboard in northern regions, in which case your decisions to layout must also place a huge consideration on how well the layout lends itself to living aboard in freezing temps.

I bought a Wittholz 40 Passage 30 some years ago, because (other than having a ballasted offshore pedigree mentioned in Beebe's Bible) it is all on one level, aside from the forward stateroom being 4 steps down. With bad knees, I only go down there to sleep, so it's all good.

While some have mentioned here about using every possible space to please the usual weekend boaters and family cruisers, a well found offshore trawler with liveaboard features will have lots of unused space for tools, spares, work space, easy to get around insulating water tanks, etc....
Interiors that extort every inch of space are usually too cut up anyway in our size of boats. So, worry not about a boat with one level and lots of bilge space - you will find stuff to fill all that up with.
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Old 09-29-2016, 03:27 PM   #31
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cappy208 brought up a good point re cored hulls - you do not want core below waterline! So, that will not be the case with a Taiwan made older trawler, but their fuel tanks and such structural members as stringers and bulkheads did not stand up well for moisture ingression.
Having said that, in fact there are a lot of them out there, who's owners have taken care of them, they did not serve in the charter trade and they will survey well!

Re the other point brought up by cappy208:
After making my living for the last 30 years consulting with recreational passage makers (under power), I never steer a client away from a first big boat purchase.
You will eventually want to go up in size and so you might as well do it right out of the starting line. Otherwise you are paying brokers and surveyors while you move up one at a time.
Remember this (my disagreement with the good captain who had thrown off many of 100 ton masters from their watch) is that big boats handle better. More weight, less weather born influence, it's that simple. Once you learn the boat's peculiarities, an 80 footer (obviously has more below the waterline surface than smaller boats) will handle a hell of a lot easier than a 25 or 40 footer under the same conditions - do not be afraid to buy the biggest boat you can REALISTICALLY afford!
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Old 09-29-2016, 03:44 PM   #32
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I don't know your experience with boats. If you haven't got a track record with larger boats I would certainly check with your insurance carrier to see what they will cover. It's my experience that moorage in the PNW gets pretty tough to find in a desirable area for over 40' and gets increasing harder the longer your boat is.
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Old 09-29-2016, 09:05 PM   #33
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Wifey B: I suggest selecting a good anchor and then finding the boat that goes well with it.
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Old 09-29-2016, 09:45 PM   #34
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My goal with my questions is to learn enough to be able to make my decision, when time comes. I am not expecting anyone to tell me which boat is the best. As all of you suggested here, it is very subjective, and based on lot of different factors.

I do get your point about the ' windage '. Here is a boat, which is long and tall, but the superstructure is not like the Canoe 53(60) was. What is your opinion? Is this still going to grab a lot of wind?

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Old 09-29-2016, 09:55 PM   #35
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While some have mentioned here about using every possible space to please the usual weekend boaters and family cruisers, a well found offshore trawler with liveaboard features will have lots of unused space for tools, spares, work space, easy to get around insulating water tanks, etc....
Capt. Joe

I really like your opinion about space. I must share that I am not much of a party person and single, for now. I don't need bar, icemaker, etc. I want a functional boat, which I can handle even alone. Yes, I will be a weekend cruiser for few years. But when the time comes, I will go out there. ( I used to be a seaman at young age ) So, I need a boat, which is comfortable enough for liveaboard, but also seaworthy to go beyond the coastline. To me the solid hull, solid equipment is more important than entertaining and accommodating guest frequently. Again, I've done that at young age.
So, I am very open about the size of the boat. I believe, it has to be between 40-50, but it can be larger, if I can afford it and maintain it. It is an open book for now. As my knowledge evolves, my idea about the ideal boat is changing, of course. But the mentioned characteristics above are important to me.
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Old 09-29-2016, 09:57 PM   #36
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So, what is the most important part of choosing the anchor: shape, weight, functionality?
Kind of like choosing a lady.... lol
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Old 09-29-2016, 10:03 PM   #37
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You are correct, mooring is a big problem in the Seattle area for larger boats. I did an extensive search, but it comes down to the commute to work. I think I have found my solution, which will work for me, even if the boat is in the 50-60 range. So, that is kind of solved.
The insurance is also in place. I have talked to an agent already and it will be around $200/mo for over 50', because of the size and my lack of experience with pleasure yachts. I can manage that, too.
If I end up with a 40', all better. I think my limit would be around 55', but a nice layout 40'-er will make me happy, too. Again, it all comes back to the yearly expenses. If the budgeted 15-20% of the purchase value covers it, I am good.
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Old 09-30-2016, 01:29 AM   #38
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So, what is the most important part of choosing the anchor: shape, weight, functionality?
Kind of like choosing a lady.... lol
Choosing and then ignoring all those who say you chose wrong. And nothing like choosing a lady.
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Old 09-30-2016, 04:56 AM   #39
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"Do you have recommended resources about construction?

Pascoe is a start.

Is this about the hull, or the whole boat?

You will own so have to repair/maintain the entire boat

What boat would you recommend?"

I would suggest you look at boats where the hull and deck are solid glass.

Foam core has little risk , balsa or plywood high risk.

Extend your boat search to "motor yachts" from just trawlers as many have the same engine and underwater shape.

If dockside living is the goal, but a boat that already is fitted out that way.

If you like cruising and spending time on the hook, find a cruiser already outfitted for non marina living.
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Old 09-30-2016, 07:31 AM   #40
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I am reading Pascoe's books now.
How would I find out about these details like, core/balsa/plywood? YW does not really say it. I would like to narrow down my search to those, which are less headache. Do you know a source? Or, I need to look up each boat I like, to find out how is it made? Sometimes, the web search does not say anything about the builder of a particular boat. This forum helps a lot, but a source with these details would be helpful.
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