Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-19-2016, 02:58 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
City: Norfolk, VA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Bells
Vessel Model: Marine Trader 38
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 270
Kopr-Shield question

For those of you who have used the Kopr-Shield Conductor Termination Compound, I have a question for you. I'm trying the stuff on the male ends of my shore power connections. I know I'm supposed to put on a thin coat, but I'm not sure if I'm suppose to let it dry for some period of time before reconnecting the connectors, or if I should reconnect the connectors immediately so the Kopr-Shield also gets in the female part of the connection. The directions on the container seem to indicate that maybe I can reassemble the plug right away. If I'm supposed to wait a while before reassembly, how long should I wait?
__________________
Advertisement

seattleboatguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2016, 04:04 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Toolbuddie's Avatar
 
City: Huntsville, AL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sea Note
Vessel Model: Mainship 40
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 185
Boat guy,
Koppershield doesn't dry. Unless it has changed over the last 20 years. Is it still a brush it on affair? Kind of oily? Messy as hell. Are you subverting corrosion or seeking better conductivity?
__________________

Toolbuddie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2016, 04:51 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
City: Norfolk, VA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Bells
Vessel Model: Marine Trader 38
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolbuddie View Post
Boat guy,
Koppershield doesn't dry. Unless it has changed over the last 20 years. Is it still a brush it on affair? Kind of oily? Messy as hell. Are you subverting corrosion or seeking better conductivity?
If it doesn't dry, that answers my question. Yes, it is still the brush on affair, and has the outward appearance of thick copper pudding. I'm hoping for both corrosion control and good conductivity. I guess time will tell. Thanks for the feedback.
seattleboatguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2016, 05:25 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Toolbuddie's Avatar
 
City: Huntsville, AL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sea Note
Vessel Model: Mainship 40
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 185
Boat guy don't be too liberal applying the stuff. It is not best used like you are doing. Because it is conducive it can short circuit between the blades of the plug. It seems you have already applied the stuff and I know others on here recommended it I suggest caution with this use. Don't get it on your clothes or anything else you don't want permanent stains on. Ask me how I know!
Dave
Toolbuddie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2016, 05:36 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Toolbuddie's Avatar
 
City: Huntsville, AL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sea Note
Vessel Model: Mainship 40
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 185
For anyone reading this thread. Kopr-shield is fine copper suspended is a viscous oil. That's good when used where is is intended. Typically used on couplings of rigid metallic conduit, some electrical connections where tracking wouldn't occur. Our shore power cords are not where I want it. It is very conducive oily substance and will flow to where it doesn't belong. Wipe off all of the excess that you can. Please don't misconstrue my caution for chastisement. As always cheers,
Dave
Toolbuddie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2016, 06:38 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
City: Norfolk, VA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Bells
Vessel Model: Marine Trader 38
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolbuddie View Post
Boat guy don't be too liberal applying the stuff. It is not best used like you are doing. Because it is conducive it can short circuit between the blades of the plug. It seems you have already applied the stuff and I know others on here recommended it I suggest caution with this use. Don't get it on your clothes or anything else you don't want permanent stains on. Ask me how I know!
Dave
I would assume that if it never dries, I could just wipe it off and use something else on the shore power plugs. What do you like?
seattleboatguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2016, 11:55 AM   #7
Guru
 
C lectric's Avatar
 
City: B.C.
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Island Pride
Vessel Model: Palmer sedan 32'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,363
Use Silicone grease. It is NOT conductive but will do a fine job of protecting the contacts.
Dow 111 or Dow 7 or many others. Often referred to as Dielectric silicone grease.

The Kop R sheild or similar has its uses in the battery system on the big contacts. I've used Kop R sheild many times for antiseize in hot applications but not electrical contacts.

Personally I use NoAlox as it was developed to prevent corrosion between aluminum wire and copper terminals. It too is conductive so should not be used where you are intending.
C lectric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2016, 08:04 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Toolbuddie's Avatar
 
City: Huntsville, AL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sea Note
Vessel Model: Mainship 40
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 185
Boat guy I believe in clean and dry for cord connections. You could use the silicon grease for corrosion inhibitors. But it is an insulator. That is probably counterproductive. At this point I have to ask if you are having issues or just proactive in your maintenance?
Toolbuddie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2016, 08:43 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
City: Norfolk, VA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Bells
Vessel Model: Marine Trader 38
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolbuddie View Post
Boat guy I believe in clean and dry for cord connections. You could use the silicon grease for corrosion inhibitors. But it is an insulator. That is probably counterproductive. At this point I have to ask if you are having issues or just proactive in your maintenance?
Just trying to be proactive. In the past, I have had to replace cords and inlets that died of black burn marks. Not cheap, and a little scary.
seattleboatguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2016, 09:03 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 215
I have 30 amp cords routinely fail at the ground pin. They seem to burn iut. Any remedy suggested?
MVDarlin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2016, 12:17 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Toolbuddie's Avatar
 
City: Huntsville, AL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sea Note
Vessel Model: Mainship 40
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 185
MV, the ground? My initial reaction is that you have a severe wiring problem. The ground should not carry ANY current routinely. Do you in fact intend to say the neutral?
If you do mean to say Ground and that is in fact what is happening you may need some professional help with this. My first reaction is that you have a failed high current piece of equipment on you boat that has a short circuit to the ground. You could also have wires rolled to the ground bus that should be to the Neutral bus.
If you are having the neutral pin burning I would start with the pedestal outlets. Have whomever owns that to open it up, Check voltage to ensure the Hot is the black, Neutral is the white and the ground is the green and wired to the correct terminal in the pedestal. Then follow through your cords to your boat inlet. open that up make the same connection verifications. While you are there take those connections apart check for corrosion. When the old receptacles lose there spring tension they cannot make a good electrical connection that carries the current you are using. Depending on the age and environment your boat has lived in you may want to replace the boat receptacle(s). ( actually a male plug made into your boat ).
What you said is your cords are what are burning. On the boat end or the pedestal?
Toolbuddie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2016, 12:25 PM   #12
Guru
 
Heron's Avatar
 
City: Cypress Landing Marina (NC)
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Heron (2)
Vessel Model: '88 Cape Dory 28 Flybridge #115
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 1,250
Quote:
Originally Posted by MVDarlin View Post
I have 30 amp cords routinely fail at the ground pin. They seem to burn iut. Any remedy suggested?
Smartplugs and dielectric grease..
__________________
Steve
Heron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2016, 12:32 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Toolbuddie's Avatar
 
City: Huntsville, AL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sea Note
Vessel Model: Mainship 40
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 185
Boatguy. Alright I see where you are coming from now. If you are repeatedly having the problem of burned connections this is suggesting that you persistently have an overcurrent situation. Are you having this on one cord or does the problem show up on both cords? You may want to start with everything de-energized and start checking and or disassembling each connection and either clean and abraid (small wire brush to clean) the conductors or if you have some slack. Cut off the end and strip to get fresh wire into the connection. Also check the bus connections in your panel. Yes this condition would be troubling to anyone to see. This would be my suggestion. Then take current measurements at the closest point to the plug mounted in the boat. Turn things on and note the rise in current and evaluate if it is the amount one could reasonably expect to see. Clamp on Amp meter would be the tool of choice for this. Borrow a good quality one with at minimum one amp sensitivity. It should measure down to 1/10 th of an amp ideally. This not a requirement but if you can get the use of a good one you will KNOW what you are measuring. I find that a loose connection somewhere drives up the current most often in the boats I have had hands on. Good luck I think you can find the culprit if you make a methodical exploration. As always, Safety first and cheers.
Dave
Toolbuddie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2016, 12:45 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Toolbuddie's Avatar
 
City: Huntsville, AL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sea Note
Vessel Model: Mainship 40
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 185
Sparingly with the grease. A little does a lot. the thinner application the better.
Toolbuddie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2016, 06:37 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
City: Norfolk, VA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Bells
Vessel Model: Marine Trader 38
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolbuddie View Post
Boatguy. Alright I see where you are coming from now. If you are repeatedly having the problem of burned connections this is suggesting that you persistently have an overcurrent situation.
Dave
Hi Dave. My goodness, you really went to a lot of trouble to try to help me out. Thank you very much for all the advice and troubleshooting suggestions. I toasted a power cord or two on my sailboat, but that is sold now. The latest power cord toasting happened on the cord devoted to powering my air conditioner on my current boat. The a/c self destructed at the height of summer. It is very possible that, as the air conditioner died, it took the poor power cord with it. Both air conditioner and power cord have been replaced now. My past toastings could also have been a self inflicted wound. In the past, I was pretty casual about making sure the power was off before pulling the plug. The cost of the toastings has now made me down right paranoid about shutting off the power before pulling the cord; an expensive lesson, but one that not even I am likely to forget. If I get another toasted cord, I'll look into your suggestions concerning the close monitoring of circuits for overcurrent conditions. Again, thanks very much for taking such an interest in my problems.
seattleboatguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2016, 07:59 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Toolbuddie's Avatar
 
City: Huntsville, AL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sea Note
Vessel Model: Mainship 40
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 185
No sweat. I like electricity and talking about it. Still a good idea to make some notes in regards to current draw under loads. Call it baseline can be very useful later if problems occur. Cheers.
Dave
Toolbuddie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2016, 08:09 PM   #17
Guru
 
City: Sydney
Country: Australia
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 1,646
gaston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2016, 05:16 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
City: Norfolk, VA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Bells
Vessel Model: Marine Trader 38
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 270
Wouldn't a "wax" tend to decrease the electrical conductivity between 2 electrical surfaces, such as the male and female parts of a shore power connection? What do you typically use this wax for?
seattleboatguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2016, 11:13 PM   #19
Guru
 
C lectric's Avatar
 
City: B.C.
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Island Pride
Vessel Model: Palmer sedan 32'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,363
Use of dielectrics like I suggested is warranted. Yes, it is non conductive. BUT the action of pushing the contacts together will wipe it off that specific area. NO contact has perfect mating, none I've seen. There are air gaps, tiny but present, and the remaining dielectric will fill those gaps slowing air contamination caused corrosion.
It will also slow the wiping or wear of the tin coating on the contacts.

You don't need gobs. I usually work some into a blue Scot shop paper towel and then use that to WIPE the plug contacts. All it takes is a thin smear.

Some like stuff like Boeshield spray since when it dries it leaves a waxy film but again getting wiped from the real contact area and the filling the air gaps.

If you are having problems with more than one cord plug burning then have you contacted the marina to replace the receptacle you plug in to. Once the cord plug burns if you can see ANY darkening on the receptacle then maybe the contacts inside, which you cannot see, have been damaged resulting in a less than good contact. That poor contact will then cause the new plug to fail earlier than it should.

Pulling the plug from the receptacle without shutting off power will, if any load is operating, cause sparking which may burn the contacts, both plug and receptacle. All power should be off before unplugging.
__________________

C lectric is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012