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Old 08-25-2015, 08:04 PM   #21
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Looks great! What kinda pump is the HP never seen one of those.

You'll be thanking yourself for going with the autoflush!
I already am, it's in and set...but what people do not realize is that pickeling a watermaker only takes a few minutes. Just mix the powder in a gallon or two of clean water, turn a valve and run the thing.
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Old 08-25-2015, 08:09 PM   #22
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I already am, it's in and set...but what people do not realize is that pickeling a watermaker only takes a few minutes. Just mix the powder in a gallon or two of clean water, turn a valve and run the thing.

Also the stuff isn't the best for components. Some N owners were having problems with the pickling solution effecting valves.
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Old 08-25-2015, 08:26 PM   #23
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Clean work. Use a couple a weeks then let us all know how it works for ya.
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Old 12-30-2015, 07:52 PM   #24
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How is the watermaker working out?
Still all good?
Turn it on, turn it off get water type of simple?

Ken
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Old 12-30-2015, 08:06 PM   #25
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We are currently installing the same unit on our boat, about half way done. Hope to be finished in a few days. When we finish, I'll try to post a few pics.
Happy New Year Gang!
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Old 01-26-2016, 08:12 AM   #26
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Will be water maker shopping in Seattle in a few days. How is this one working out? Seems like one of the most cost effective solutions to lots of water.

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Old 01-26-2016, 08:53 AM   #27
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Hi Kevin and all... posters...

I'm late to the gate on this thread. Scaned posts this morn; didn't notice Water Maker brand or model. Also, can you provide approx cost for the WM and sundry parts/special-tools needed for self-installation? What number of amps does it take to run it and amp hours used for a full day's production... believe I read that 24 hr run = 40 gal fresh water?

Your "quick" install job looks great - Congrats!!
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Old 01-26-2016, 09:35 AM   #28
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The watermaker came from Cruise RO water and power

Cruise RO Water & Power: Watermakers for Boats & Yachts

The one I bought is the 40 gallon per hour unit which cost $5600. I also bought the fresh water flush option kit for $595

The only things I had to buy to make this unit work was a seawater strainer and nipples to get from the seawater strainer to the 1/2" inlet to the watermaker.

Oh, I also uses some screws from my stash to bolt the parts to the boat.

Everything else came with it, including easy to follow DIY instructions, and VERY fast email and phone support for the few questions I had.

The unit works great and changed the way we boat. Long showers, no problem. Doing laundry, sure. Need to wash the salt off of the windows to get a clearer view, why not.

I even completely removed the salt water washdown from the boat. Gone and I love it. Just connected a potable water line to my old salt water pump plumbing and was good to go.
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Old 01-26-2016, 10:36 AM   #29
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The watermaker came from Cruise RO water and power

Cruise RO Water & Power: Watermakers for Boats & Yachts

The one I bought is the 40 gallon per hour unit which cost $5600. I also bought the fresh water flush option kit for $595

The only things I had to buy to make this unit work was a seawater strainer and nipples to get from the seawater strainer to the 1/2" inlet to the watermaker.

Oh, I also uses some screws from my stash to bolt the parts to the boat.

Everything else came with it, including easy to follow DIY instructions, and VERY fast email and phone support for the few questions I had.

The unit works great and changed the way we boat. Long showers, no problem. Doing laundry, sure. Need to wash the salt off of the windows to get a clearer view, why not.

I even completely removed the salt water washdown from the boat. Gone and I love it. Just connected a potable water line to my old salt water pump plumbing and was good to go.
Thanks!
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Old 01-26-2016, 12:03 PM   #30
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Hate to post a discouraging word regarding the Cruise RO Watermaker, but in my opinion, it has a few warts. I bought one of their 30GPH kits two months ago, and am in mid-install as we speak.

a. Regarding the system design, the provided boost pump is a constant displacement pump. The Shurflo pump supplied requires a bypass to prevent damage to the pump in the event >10psi head is applied to the discharge. In other words, should the operator either over-clamp the discharge, or the down-stream filters become plugged, this pump must vent excess pressure back to the intake side of the pump. This is accomplished in the provided hardware with a check valve between the discharge and intake of the pump, with a cracking pressure of 11psi. It is plumbed with the Mur-Lok fittings Cruise RO is so fond of, and is (again IMHO) not very professionally done. Several very competent boatwrights have looked at the pump and piping and agreed it was not to their liking.
b. The supplied Shurflo pump is NOT rated continuous duty as supplied by Shurflow. It comes from Cruise RO with an acrylic mounted fan to supply cooling air, to help it live. Not impressed.
c. The common solution by most other watermaker vendors is to use a centrifugal pump, installed below the waterline, and rated continuous duty. There are LOTS of these, which easily supply the flow and pressure at the high pressure pump required to prevent HP pump damage. They are self-regulating regarding both pressure and volume. Given a centrifugal with sufficient capacity, when over-clamped, they hum along nicely, even with no flow. Cruise RO's response to this issue is to claim they have at least 20 pumps lying in their shop that have failed this application, and their's is the only solution that works. Huh.
d. The as-supplied design does NOT meet ABYC recommendations for below-the-waterline connections to through-hulls. ABYC recommends vinyl or rubber fiber-reinforced hose, double-clamped to a barbed fitting on the through-hull, for all components below the waterline. ABYC specifically discourages (and, for USCG classification, the CFRs ban) plastic fittings in this application. As most of us do not operate classed vessels, the CG won't care during a routine safety inspection. However, should the vessel suffer water intrusion caused by a plastic fitting (other than Marelon) below the waterline, you betcha your insurance surveyor will care, and possibly deny your claim if so equipped.
e. GA Murdock Inc, the supplier of the Mur-Lok fittings used in the Cruise RO watermaker kit, will NOT sell retail. The only retail vendor they provided to me over the phone does not stock a particular fitting I need to finish my install, nor did Cruise RO. Cruise RO offered to special order this fitting from GA Murdock, with a minimum order of 10 units. Not sure what to do with 9 spares... My pre-purchase inquiry to Cruise RO, asking about the availability of aftermarket Mur-Lok fittings should an issue occur during the install, or later somewhere in the boonies for a repair, was met with the response that they provided "everything" needed make the original install, and some spares as well. Maybe, if you're willing to accept a butch job.
f. Modular watermakers are, by definition, custom installations. Yet this one comes pre-plumbed with these Mur-Lok fittings, with some limited spares provided. Attempts to re-plumb to fit my particular installation required removal of many of the pre-plumbed fittings, salvaging the needed fittings from other parts of the kit, and (in the case of the below-the-waterline fittings) re-plumbing with conventional bronze pipe fittings and reinforced hose. It would be MUCH less time consuming to install this thing if the major components were supplied bare, so the existing plumbing doesn't have to be removed prior to plumbing it to fit each install.

The basic parts (osmotic membranes and housings, HP pump, panels, etc.) are fine. "Some assembly required" is an understatement, but that's installation-specific. The cost of the kit is competitive, but no screaming bargain, given the re-work required to make the thing fit and work. And I'm not real impressed with the whole Mur-Lok fitting gig. Every marine supply house ON THE PLANET stocks barbs, hose, and hose clamps. Mur-Lok? Not.

All of this is, of course, my opinion. I'm not one to butch up an install of anything, simply for expedience. I've been at this yachting hobby many, many years, and have a pretty good professional background in this hydraulics stuff as well. Would I recommend this company to others? Yes, with MANY caveats. Would I buy another from Cruise RO? Nope, I'd simply multiple-source the components, and build my own. YMMV.

Regards,

Pete
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Old 01-26-2016, 02:23 PM   #31
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Pete

Great comments!

Instead of quoting your post I'll offer some comments..

I had the same question regarding the Murdock fittings. When I googled the Murdock fittings I found that they are in wide use among RO manufacturers, so I had no problem using them. I found them easy to use and only had one leak which was my fault.

Regarding their use below the waterline, well the installation does not require that.

The salt water inlet to the system is the filter assembly. That has a 1/2" FPT fitting. You can run whatever you want to it from your seacock. In my installation I used a Raritan sea strainer which is mounted right at the waterline as it should be.

Good installation practice would dictate that the filters also be above the waterline alleviating any below the waterline concerns. The concept here is that we want to minimize the below the waterline connections and devices.

The boost pump I have no problem with. Yes they could have used a different pump. They chose that pump though. I will not pretend to be a watermaker engineer and I am not going to question every design decision they made. I bought a unit with a nice manufacturers warranty, and assume that it is engineered for its intended purpose.

Best of luck on finishing your install. I found mine to be easy and straightforward.
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Old 01-26-2016, 02:56 PM   #32
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Awesome install Kevin! I now have this on my bucket list right after auto pilot...
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Old 03-02-2016, 11:38 AM   #33
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My question is for Kevin and Pete and anyone else with experience with Cruise RO Watermakers:

Background -- I have two 600 gpd watermakers on board. They worked fine for several years but (the high pressure pumps) have now failed and the manufacturer can't supply parts or replacement pumps. So, I am in search of two new water makers from a different manufacturer. Along the way, I have learned that my current brand uses proprietary osmotic filters, so the cost of replacement is about $1,000 (each) more than it would otherwise be.

What I liked about my current watermakers is that everything was automated. I press one button and it begins production, with a green light to tell me it is making good water. When I am done I press a single button to stop it and the green light goes away. The freshwater flush happens automatically, even if I don't leave my freshwater pump turned on (which I don't like to do when I will be away from the boat).

Now my question -- how much attention is necessary to keep the watermaker producing at near its rated capacity. A prior water maker I had required the adjustment of pressure valves. Too little pressure and little or now production. Too much pressure and the thing would shut itself off. If it were only a matter of setting and forgetting, that would be fine, but with my prior unit, pressure would gradually build until it hit the shut off point. So, in practice, I would have to adjust the water maker several times during its first hour of production and I would have to check on it every hour or so after.
My question is, with the Cruise RO unit, how much adjustment, during production, is necessary?
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Old 03-02-2016, 11:56 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by MYTraveler View Post
My question is for Kevin and Pete and anyone else with experience with Cruise RO Watermakers:

Background -- I have two 600 gpd watermakers on board. They worked fine for several years but (the high pressure pumps) have now failed and the manufacturer can't supply parts or replacement pumps. So, I am in search of two new water makers from a different manufacturer. Along the way, I have learned that my current brand uses proprietary osmotic filters, so the cost of replacement is about $1,000 (each) more than it would otherwise be.

What I liked about my current watermakers is that everything was automated. I press one button and it begins production, with a green light to tell me it is making good water. When I am done I press a single button to stop it and the green light goes away. The freshwater flush happens automatically, even if I don't leave my freshwater pump turned on (which I don't like to do when I will be away from the boat).

Now my question -- how much attention is necessary to keep the watermaker producing at near its rated capacity. A prior water maker I had required the adjustment of pressure valves. Too little pressure and little or now production. Too much pressure and the thing would shut itself off. If it were only a matter of setting and forgetting, that would be fine, but with my prior unit, pressure would gradually build until it hit the shut off point. So, in practice, I would have to adjust the water maker several times during its first hour of production and I would have to check on it every hour or so after.
My question is, with the Cruise RO unit, how much adjustment, during production, is necessary?
Good question.....
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Old 03-02-2016, 12:11 PM   #35
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Good question.....
Well if you believe the ads and sales guys, no worries.

I have intentionally not installed an RO unit because (God Bless Art) has about 2 to 3 weeks capacity and 400 gallons. The RO unit in our house is serviced once per year and can produce about 20 to 40 gallons per day full beat. On a boat that is all we'd need, but then the power supply issue comes into it.

I've been on vessels with true 400 to 2,000 gallon per day units. Lots of work to keep them performing properly. Onerous, no. Expensive, yes. Village Marine is my choice.
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Old 03-02-2016, 01:48 PM   #36
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To MYTraveler:

Sorry, can't yet comment on your direct question regarding the amount of adjustment required to the Cruise RO watermaker hi-pressure pump after it's in operation. I just finished my install, and haven't had a chance to adequately test it yet. But I have no reason to believe that it will require any attention during operation, other than to monitor water tank capacity, and to shut down the watermaker when the tank's full.

i CAN comment on your more general inquiry, regarding your desire for a "start and forget" watermaker. Cruise RO aint' it. With the exception of the optional automatic fresh water flush, all operation of the Cruise RO unit is manual. Hence it's popularity with those of us so inclined to be "hands-on" owner/operators.

And, with regard to your prior watermaker that apparently required significant adjustment of it's operating pressure during operation, I can only surmise that the unit may have had either significant RO membrane fouling, or perhaps fouling in the pre-filters upstream of the high pressure pump. My experience with a 1985-vintage Sea Recovery 400 GPD watermaker, which was also a manual unit, required NO adjustment of the hi-pressure outlet pressure to maintain water production, hour after hour after hour of use for many years. Regular maintenance of filters, and occasional replacement of membranes required, of course.

Another general comment, if I may be so bold. Watermakers love to be used. They seem to require less maintenance the more hours they accumulate at any one time. Relying on much of the prevalent watermaker manufacturers' hype regarding "automatic operation, low maintenance" is a ticket to disappointment. Run 'em often, fresh water flush periodically, pickle them properly if they must sit for months at a time, and pay close attention to the pre-filter condition. Works good, lasts long time.

Regards,

Pete
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Old 03-02-2016, 02:37 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MYTraveler View Post
My question is for Kevin and Pete and anyone else with experience with Cruise RO Watermakers:

Background -- I have two 600 gpd watermakers on board. They worked fine for several years but (the high pressure pumps) have now failed and the manufacturer can't supply parts or replacement pumps. So, I am in search of two new water makers from a different manufacturer. Along the way, I have learned that my current brand uses proprietary osmotic filters, so the cost of replacement is about $1,000 (each) more than it would otherwise be.

What I liked about my current watermakers is that everything was automated. I press one button and it begins production, with a green light to tell me it is making good water. When I am done I press a single button to stop it and the green light goes away. The freshwater flush happens automatically, even if I don't leave my freshwater pump turned on (which I don't like to do when I will be away from the boat).

Now my question -- how much attention is necessary to keep the watermaker producing at near its rated capacity. A prior water maker I had required the adjustment of pressure valves. Too little pressure and little or now production. Too much pressure and the thing would shut itself off. If it were only a matter of setting and forgetting, that would be fine, but with my prior unit, pressure would gradually build until it hit the shut off point. So, in practice, I would have to adjust the water maker several times during its first hour of production and I would have to check on it every hour or so after.
My question is, with the Cruise RO unit, how much adjustment, during production, is necessary?
When you start up the water maker you adjust the pressure on the membrane, and you adjust the boost pump to keep sufficient flow into the high pressure pump.

When in operation I have not had to fiddle with it, although the first few times it did watch it very closely.

Shutting it down is a matter of reducing the membrane pressure, then shutting down the pumps.

One reason I bought the Cruise RO unit is that it does not use any proprietary parts. I ran D&B credit reports on a couple of water maker companies and they tend to be very small companies that appear to amount to a job for the owners and not much more. Cruise RO is no exception, the difference is that customers are not dependent on them for maintenance parts or consumables.

I actually searched for the main components like the high pressure pump, membranes, and housings and found the exact same brands readily available.
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Old 03-02-2016, 02:52 PM   #38
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To MYTraveler:

Sorry, can't yet comment on your direct question regarding the amount of adjustment required to the Cruise RO watermaker hi-pressure pump after it's in operation. I just finished my install, and haven't had a chance to adequately test it yet. But I have no reason to believe that it will require any attention during operation, other than to monitor water tank capacity, and to shut down the watermaker when the tank's full.

i CAN comment on your more general inquiry, regarding your desire for a "start and forget" watermaker. Cruise RO aint' it. With the exception of the optional automatic fresh water flush, all operation of the Cruise RO unit is manual. Hence it's popularity with those of us so inclined to be "hands-on" owner/operators.

And, with regard to your prior watermaker that apparently required significant adjustment of it's operating pressure during operation, I can only surmise that the unit may have had either significant RO membrane fouling, or perhaps fouling in the pre-filters upstream of the high pressure pump. My experience with a 1985-vintage Sea Recovery 400 GPD watermaker, which was also a manual unit, required NO adjustment of the hi-pressure outlet pressure to maintain water production, hour after hour after hour of use for many years. Regular maintenance of filters, and occasional replacement of membranes required, of course.

Another general comment, if I may be so bold. Watermakers love to be used. They seem to require less maintenance the more hours they accumulate at any one time. Relying on much of the prevalent watermaker manufacturers' hype regarding "automatic operation, low maintenance" is a ticket to disappointment. Run 'em often, fresh water flush periodically, pickle them properly if they must sit for months at a time, and pay close attention to the pre-filter condition. Works good, lasts long time.

Regards,

Pete
Pete,
Thanks for your reply and please let me know how it goes after you test your unit. It would be nice to know whether the thing can run without continued adjustment. (My understanding is that my current unit monitored and adjusted pressure, automatically.)

As for frequency of use, I totally agree. Most of the use of my boat is for multi-day stretches and the watermakers get several hours use per day.

As for maintenance, is there anything to do besides change pre-filters? On my current unit there is not, and I am convinced no amount of additional maintenance would have prevented the failures.

Lastly, you mentioned that you need only remember to shut the unit off when the tank is full. As I recall, my unit specified that the feed line have zero (or very limited) backpressure. Because I was concerned that overfilling the tank (and thereby adding the pressure to left the water to the level of the vent) might cause problems, I had a separate overflow line put in. As a result, I never had to worry about shutting off the watermakers.

Thanks,
Rick
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Old 03-02-2016, 03:00 PM   #39
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Kevin

Good work and thanks for sharing. A few questions:

--Is the Seward Harbor clean enough so unit can be run there?
--Does the higher suspended solids in AK glacial waters present a problem
--Have you pickled unit yet, if so how long does it take you?
--Where do you buy pre-filters and RO membranes?
--What is power draw?

Thanks
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Old 03-02-2016, 04:47 PM   #40
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When you start up the water maker you adjust the pressure on the membrane, and you adjust the boost pump to keep sufficient flow into the high pressure pump.

When in operation I have not had to fiddle with it, although the first few times it did watch it very closely.
Thank you for the follow-up! Good information. -Rick
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