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Old 04-13-2014, 12:48 PM   #21
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There is a big difference between fibreglassing a new wooden hull, and covering up a rotting mess in a last ditch effort to keep the water out.

Because of the bad reputation that fibreglass over wood boats have, a well built one can often be quite a bargain.
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Old 04-13-2014, 05:59 PM   #22
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Generally speaking, there is no magic spot to locate the stabilizers fore and aft. I have seen and used them way forward, far aft, and amidships. Most fishboats have them installed some distance forward of midships. Installing them at 28% of waterline length forward of the transom was Beebe's idea of a theoretical "pitching center" where motion was least. But I have not seen it make one bit of difference either way. Forward may be a bit better as it will flatten out the pitching.....

Quest is indeed an unusual vessel. Her 2" red cedar strip planking is actually a structural core, rather than a mold. The propeller shaft is horizontal and the main engine is mounted backwards over it and offset to port. There's a multiple vee-belt from the engine shaft down to the front of the Hundested CP unit. This is a lot more versatile, quiet, and smooth compared with a large vee-drive (geared) unit.
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Old 04-13-2014, 09:21 PM   #23
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Eric, when I'm able I hope to take a peak at the stern and research a make if she is a documented vessel. She is a capable looking salty girl to me.


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Old 04-13-2014, 10:09 PM   #24
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Firefly; I am surprised that you have little faith in wood glass composite boats. Some what like steel and aluminum boats, its what products were used and the skill and care in putting it all together and protecting the final product.. Wood is still an excellent structural material and modern epoxy and glass carbon or similar cloths are capable of keeping moisture out. Metal fasteners along with all their problems can be kept out of the equation on a composite boat. FG boats certainly need protection from water intrusion be it gel coat or epoxy finishes not much different than wood or steel. Aluminum has its own set of problems and then there is monel and its hard to find one of those boats. About 2 years ago I went through the process of deciding what building material and technique to use on a one off build. My conclusion was its not so much the material or method as it is how its done and by who.
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Old 04-13-2014, 11:30 PM   #25
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Greetings,
Mr. e. As I mentioned in post #20, the only wood/FRP hulls I was familiar with were the ready for the knacker, band-aid repaired boats. Pre 1968 wooden Trojans, Pacemakers, Chris Craft, Owens and the like were/are great boats BUT, and my only experience is with fresh water use of these vessels, also great media for dry rot. I remember back in the 60's, those cedar strip runabouts, so popular with the cottage crowd, were approaching 15 to 20 years old, starting to leak and their aging owners got tired of having to let them soak for 3 or 4 days after the spring launch until the leakage slowed enough for the boat to even be used. The most popular fix then was to slap on a layer of FRP. Problem solved, no more leaks. The fact that the bottom rotted out in short order was no big deal because the boat was already old and ripe for replacement.
I agree it's the construction and not so much the material but maintenance is the deciding factor in the longevity of any vessel.
As Mr. D was so kind to describe, the vessel in question was purpose built using a technique I was totally unfamiliar with and from Mr. D's description is most probably a fine vessel. There's no denying wood is an excellent building material for boats. It is simply that a wooden vessel will suffer much more from neglect than most other materials IMO.
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Old 04-14-2014, 05:59 AM   #26
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>Wood is still an excellent structural material and modern epoxy and glass carbon or similar cloths are capable of keeping moisture out.<

No doubt , but many old boats were built with polly , not epoxy resin ,which can be a long term disaster.
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Old 04-14-2014, 07:26 AM   #27
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Greetings,
Mr. Hendo. With reference to my post #14. The ONLY wooden vessels I've seen that were glassed over wood were done IMO as a last ditch effort to get a few more years out of them as they were well past their "best before date". I was totally unfamiliar with the building technique described by Mr. D. A vessel built in such a fashion would indeed be quite stout.
Now, that brings us to AXE. An aged wooden craft to be sure BUT you're applying what I can best describe as the "Hendo Machination" an oft whispered about but seldom witnessed magical transformation/transmutation technique only hinted at in the recently translated papyrus scrolls of ancient Egypt. Aye, verily. Let it be known I would not hesitate to step aboard if I'm ever in the vicinity. You'll be fair dinkum fine mate.

Lol hello Mr Firefly. Thanks for the clarification. Happy to have you onboard anytime my friend


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Old 04-14-2014, 10:26 AM   #28
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Firefly; I am surprised that you have little faith in wood glass composite boats. Some what like steel and aluminum boats, its what products were used and the skill and care in putting it all together and protecting the final product.. Wood is still an excellent structural material and modern epoxy and glass carbon or similar cloths are capable of keeping moisture out. Metal fasteners along with all their problems can be kept out of the equation on a composite boat. FG boats certainly need protection from water intrusion be it gel coat or epoxy finishes not much different than wood or steel. Aluminum has its own set of problems and then there is monel and its hard to find one of those boats. About 2 years ago I went through the process of deciding what building material and technique to use on a one off build. My conclusion was its not so much the material or method as it is how its done and by who.
Besides being one of the nicer human beings on the planet, Sam Devlin builds a perma-boat, IMHO, as well as a beautiful one.
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Old 04-14-2014, 01:08 PM   #29
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Eric, when I'm able I hope to take a peak at the stern and research a make if she is a documented vessel. She is a capable looking salty girl to me.
That little Monterey troller copy was built by a short-lived builder called Cruising Boats of America. They (the builder) existed for a very short time in the early 1970's. For some reason no designer was credited for this boat.

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And there's one other very similar Monterey copy, a collaboration between Bob Beebe and Ed Monk. She was to be built by Puget Sound Boatworks, and I believe at least one hull was built.

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Old 04-14-2014, 01:22 PM   #30
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I've never tried to connect them before but the Monterey boats may have given birth to the Willard 30. The Willard lacks the trademark clipper bow and is not as deep (judging form TAD's pics) as the Clippers but I'm thinking there may be a connection. I'll post some pics tonight about another related boat.
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Old 04-14-2014, 03:06 PM   #31
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I've never tried to connect them before but the Monterey boats may have given birth to the Willard 30. The Willard lacks the trademark clipper bow and is not as deep (judging form TAD's pics) as the Clippers but I'm thinking there may be a connection. I'll post some pics tonight about another related boat.
Humm....Other than both being small west coast designed and built double-enders, I see no connection. One could just as well say the Willard is related to a Skeena River Gillnetter, as both are lacking the exaggerated flair and clipper bow that define the Monterey. As far as I know the Willard was drawn by Hale Field/Bill Crealock as a smaller/somewhat related version of the original Garden designed Vega 36. The 30 lacks the flair of the 36 forward, also the sheer break.

Digging a bit more I find the CBA built boat was originally offered by a Florida builder as the Maritime 31.

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Old 04-14-2014, 04:01 PM   #32
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9 knot cruise, 60 hp..... HM. With that lwl you would certainly be using some fuel b


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Old 04-14-2014, 04:26 PM   #33
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Thanks for posting that fascinating literature, Tad.
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Old 04-14-2014, 04:53 PM   #34
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9 knot cruise, 60 hp..... HM. With that lwl you would certainly be using some fuel b

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Old 04-14-2014, 08:20 PM   #35
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I photographed these two boats in Alaska several years ago. One in the water and being fished at the time. The other in either Petersburg or Wrangell. Talked to the owner of "Honeywilla" in Petersburg. Unbelievably Honeywilla was powered by a Lehman sized engine.

These two boats look very very much like the Clipper boats TAD posted. The boats in AK looked to have a more rounded hull than the Willard 30. The clipper bow is different than the W30 but below the WL they are almost the same.

TAD I think beyond the rounded stern there's no resemblance between the W30 and the W36. They look to me like boats designed by different people that never saw the other boat.
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