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Old 03-30-2015, 08:58 PM   #1721
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[QUOTE=KJ;320985]
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Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
Which tack? Not relevant unless you are on a sailboat.


I believe it is a sailboat. Or at least it used to be. I guess he's a solar sailor. KJ
Presumably he is a fair-weather, day "sailor." To me, his boat is just an odd motor vessel.
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Old 04-02-2015, 08:46 PM   #1722
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A very bizarre boat.. with supercavitating pontoons under it...



"The vessel’s counter-rotating propeller screws, spun by 4,000-horsepower gas engines, and strategically positioned vents create a pocket of gas around each pontoon.

“If you can put a blanket of gas around that hull,” Sancoff says, referring to the pontoons, “you can reduce the friction by 900 times. We’re basically boring two foam tunnels, five feet or six feet underwater, and we’re flying through them.”

In addition to speed, supercavitation produces stability and fuel efficiency. Ghost can power through seven-foot waves with hardly a bump and its range is huge: about 800 miles."

Read the full story here:

The High-Tech Battle Against Pirates | Popular Science
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Old 04-02-2015, 10:37 PM   #1723
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Can't remember if I've put these boats up before, but if not.....

A boat I have been intrigued with for a number of years is the RNLI 47' Motor Lifeboat in the UK. These boats were designed to be slipway launched due to the rugged coastline and extremely high tidal range. The boats are stationed where they are needed, not where it's convenient, so some means of storing them on shore but getting them into the water at a moment's notice had to be devised.

I first became acquainted with the Tyne-Class 47 footers through a good friend in the UK who crewed on one of them. During a visit he arranged for me to go out on "his" boat, the William Street (bottom photo). This boat is kept at Fleetwood where it performs patrol and rescue work on the infamous (and dangerous) Morecambe Bay.

I went out on a training exercise on the bay, and much to my surprise I was given the Street's helm for almost the entire exercise which lasted several hours. I drove from the bridge under the watchful eye of the coxswain and it was a fantastic experience. As he told me, "This boat has two speeds, idle and full throttle."

As a result I became very intrigued with the Tyne class boats and have tried to learn as much as possible about them. Not all of them are slipway-launched; the Street is not but is kept in its own slip near the entrance to the Fleetwood harbor. So I've not experienced the rush of a slipway launch.

When they are in their slips or in their boathouses the engines, twin GM 525 hp diesels are kept at full power temperature by hot water circulating through the blocks. So they can be started and immediately taken to full power. The Street and its capabilities and performance inspired the design of our new boat project in Europe.
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Old 04-03-2015, 12:22 AM   #1724
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Has it been in the water yet? It looks ready to go now.
He lives aboard and was just hauled for an insurance survey and a few repairs. It is hydraulic driven and the arms swing up and down to get them out of the water. Apparently there are some real limitations to sidewheelers that are not limits to sternwheelers. I was actually buying parts for my boat so had to run and missed the dissertation.
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Old 04-05-2015, 08:08 AM   #1725
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Just saw this while cruising past Sanibel Island. Almost ran out of the channel trying to take the pic. 😳

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Old 04-05-2015, 08:12 AM   #1726
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Just saw this while cruising past Sanibel Island. Almost ran out of the channel trying to take the pic. ?de33
I'm pretty sure she's a local. I recall seeing her a few weeks ago up by Useppa Is.

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Old 04-05-2015, 08:18 AM   #1727
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This gent was last seen at a marina in Merritt Island FL where he was tuning his propulsion system (all electric). There are jacks on the outboard edges of each panel, allowing him to tilt them to starboard or port depending on his heading and the sun direction. Yes, it used to be a sailboat.
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Old 04-05-2015, 09:07 AM   #1728
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I believe its a Florida Bay coaster.
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Old 04-05-2015, 09:36 AM   #1729
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Jay Benford design and built in Guatamela I think.

Ive seen pics of them and thought they were tall, but it was seriously towering up close in person.
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Old 04-05-2015, 11:09 AM   #1730
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Marin,
Re post # 17 all very interesting but to me the most interesting thing presented is the keel/prop configuration. Looks to me in the photograph like she's twin engined and w keels just outboard of the props and rudders in the conventional place.

Probably suffers a bit on performance but if it wasn't to great of a performance loss I'd think that would be a very popular configuration on trawlers above 35'. Never seen a trawler put together like this. On a trawler (unlike the motor lifeboat) smaller propellers and engines a bit closer together could reduce the distance between the keels considerably. Would be much more applicable to SD boats than DF boats as I see it.
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Old 04-05-2015, 11:28 AM   #1731
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I believe its a Florida Bay coaster.
I believe you are correct.
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Old 04-05-2015, 11:36 AM   #1732
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A PFC (Patrol Craft Fast) in San Diego Bay. After the Nam war it was turned over to the Republic of Malta in 1971 and was used in their Maritime Squadron. After 40 years of coast guard duty it was retired and in 2011 donated to the Maritime Museum of an Diego. The Swift Boat Sailors Association brought the Swift boat to San Diego to be restored and operated on San Diego Bay. With 2 V-12 diesels delivering 980 horses, the PCF 816 makes high speed runs on the bay. A 75 minute tour heads under the Coronado Bay Bridge. passes Naval Base San Diego and then the Naval Amphibious Base. The boat returns to the museum by way of the aircraft carrier basin and Naval Air Station North Island.
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Old 04-05-2015, 11:50 AM   #1733
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Eric- The RNLI Tyne-class motor lifeboat is not a "trawler" type boat. The twin V-8 powered boats like the William Street have a patrol speed of a bit over 20 knots. The twin V-6 powered boats have a patrol speed of about 17 knots.

The twin "keels" are for stability in rough water. Giant chine plates or bilge keels if you will. These boats routinely go out in some incredibly rough water and the "fins" for want of a better term add a lot of roll stability according to the crew I went out with, which makes it easier and safer to work on the deck during a rescue.

Their other equally important function is to keep the boat upright on the slipway.
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Old 04-05-2015, 12:21 PM   #1734
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Originally Posted by cardude01 View Post
Just saw this while cruising past Sanibel Island. Almost ran out of the channel trying to take the pic. 😳

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I'm pretty certain that's Irony and I believe their home port was Panama City. Nice folks and a great dog. She is a Florida Bay, and steel. Even prettier in person up close...
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Old 04-05-2015, 12:34 PM   #1735
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Somewhat bizarrely we now have a RNLI Tyne Class operating out of Richmond BC. She's called the Fraser Lifeboat and is owned and operated by the non-profit society Canadian Lifeboat Institution.

Canadian Lifeboat Institution – The Fraser Lifeboat Has Arrived!

I gather this boat was surplus, the RNLI is re-equiping with smaller/faster jet boats.
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Old 04-05-2015, 12:42 PM   #1736
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Can't figure out if this guy is on a port or starboard tack. KJ


I know that guy. He gets over 4 knots on sun. Gunite hull, old bus engine as aux, main are/is golf cart.
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Old 04-05-2015, 03:21 PM   #1737
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Eric- The RNLI Tyne-class motor lifeboat is not a "trawler" type boat. The twin V-8 powered boats like the William Street have a patrol speed of a bit over 20 knots. The twin V-6 powered boats have a patrol speed of about 17 knots.

The twin "keels" are for stability in rough water. Giant chine plates or bilge keels if you will. These boats routinely go out in some incredibly rough water and the "fins" for want of a better term add a lot of roll stability according to the crew I went out with, which makes it easier and safer to work on the deck during a rescue.

Their other equally important function is to keep the boat upright on the slipway.
Stability in rough water would be a plus for a trawler. But in a knock down type event those bilge keels may act like a tripping chine and increase the potential for a capsize. I'd like TAD to weigh in on that if he's here still.
And as to efficiency it would boil down to how much added surface area the second keel brings to the table. The props would get cleaner (less disturbed) inflow water and there may be other advantages too.
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Old 04-07-2015, 09:13 AM   #1738
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Short video on building a 74' sailboat at Brooklin Boat Yard

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Old 04-07-2015, 11:28 AM   #1739
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I gather this boat was surplus, the RNLI is re-equiping with smaller/faster jet boats.
The Tyne-class boats are still being used although some have been replaced with a similarly sized newer type. For example, the William Street, the one I got to drive, is still the Fleetwood lifeboat.

The newest lifeboat class is the Shannon-class which is roughly the same size as the Tyne-class, 13 meters for the Shannon, 14 meters for the Tyne. The Shannon boats are powerd by two 650 hp Scania diesels with Hamilton water jet drives. They are capable of 25 knots.

A goal of the RNLI has long been to have a 25 knot fleet. Their larger boats are already capable of this. Once the Shannon boats fully replace the older Tyne and Mersey class boats this goal will be realized.

The RNLI is privately funded, mostly by donations. They get no government funding and never have. (The UK has a government coast guard but it does not do what the RNLI does). So phasing in the new Shannon boats will be a long process.

Eric- Our new boat in Europe has a hull quite similar to the Tyne boats but with a flatter after section and three engines instead of two. It has a pair of fins or bilge keels similar to the Tyne boats. These "keels" serve two purposes. One, they add tremendous stability to the boat at cruise speeds in rough water, which depending on how rough it is is 15 to 30 knots. Two, they allow the boat to sit upright on the bottom when the tide goes out.

This is a very common feature on sail and some power boats in places like the UK where the tidal range is huge and the bottom slope is very shallow. For example at Morecambe Bay where the Street is stationed, when the tide is out the bay is dry to the horizon other than the dredged channels. Because of the almost imperceptible bottom slope, when the tide comes back in, it moves faster than a man can run, in some places faster than a horse can run. This makes the bay extremely dangerous and over the years there have been many deaths due to the flooding tide overtaking and drowning people who've been out harvesting cockles and other shellfish.
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Old 04-07-2015, 12:13 PM   #1740
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The Tyne-class boats are still being used although some have been replaced with a similarly sized newer type. For example, the William Street, the one I got to drive, is still the Fleetwood lifeboat.

The newest lifeboat clas is the Shannon-class which is roughly the same size as the Tyne-class, 13 meters for the Shannon, 14 meters for the Tyne.
Eventually Shannon's will replace (according to the RNLI) all the operational Tyne's, Shannon-class lifeboat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia as well as the Mersey class boats.

Length is only one method of comparison. Boat size is better done using displacement, a Tyne is 26 tons while a Shannon is 15. The Tyne can manage 17 knots while the Shannon will run at 27, and it has more range than the larger boat. Huge amount of engineering in the new Shannon's, and I think the first time RNLI has done all their own design work.

Try this
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