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Old 08-28-2016, 05:15 AM   #21
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I use a heat gun and scrapper to remove the outer veneer layer, comes off easily. Sanded to fair and installed 10mm quartered teak veneer using contact cement. It would be the same principal for formica, remove the damaged teak surface, fill any remaining gaps, holes, etc; and sand fair. Contact cement is not hard to work with if you use dowels as previously mentioned.
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Old 08-28-2016, 06:11 AM   #22
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Lay down a hunk of what ever color you choose on the area.

Does the color reflect in the PH window during the day?

Outside Visibility trumps light & bright , why many car dash boads are not too light in color.
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Old 08-28-2016, 07:27 AM   #23
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Instead of Formica you should have a look at Starboard. Grey or black is perfect for helms and is sturdier.
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Old 08-28-2016, 08:17 AM   #24
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Isn`t using white Formica over a large flat area like that going to be annoyingly bright reflective?
True that. I would never put light colored mica or paint around a helm area. You're going to regret it the first time you run at night.
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Old 08-28-2016, 08:19 AM   #25
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Instead of Formica you should have a look at Starboard. Grey or black is perfect for helms and is sturdier.
Problem with Starboard is it's thick and it's very hard to glue to anything.
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Old 08-28-2016, 08:31 AM   #26
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Problem with Starboard is it's thick and it's very hard to glue to anything.
I believe it is impossible to glue actually. It is also not the most dimensionally stable product I have ever seen. Not to suggest it isn't great stuff though! I used King Starboard to replace the teak strips Sabre installed as hatch slides on our sailboat because they always stuck. Now it slides perfectly and it looks just like it did when installed 7 years later!
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Old 08-28-2016, 09:21 AM   #27
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I believe it is impossible to glue actually. It is also not the most dimensionally stable product I have ever seen. Not to suggest it isn't great stuff though! I used King Starboard to replace the teak strips Sabre installed as hatch slides on our sailboat because they always stuck. Now it slides perfectly and it looks just like it did when installed 7 years later!
You can glue it to itself.
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Old 08-28-2016, 09:31 AM   #28
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Isn`t using white Formica over a large flat area like that going to be annoyingly bright reflective?
That would be my thought as well. White would probably be a poor choice for that location.
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Old 08-28-2016, 09:31 AM   #29
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You can glue it to itself.
I'd have bet against that! Apparently I'd have lost too...what adhesive do you use? Always good to know...
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Old 08-28-2016, 09:33 AM   #30
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I'd have bet against that! Apparently I'd have lost too...what adhesive do you use? Always good to know...
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Gluing Starboard With 2P 10 Story by Bill Foster (captbill11) | Photobucket
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Old 08-28-2016, 09:37 AM   #31
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That is amazing!
Great to know. Thanks!
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Old 08-28-2016, 10:28 AM   #32
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+1 to the folks who say: rip out/remove the loose delaminated stuff and fill w/epoxy before bonding Formica, or some other laminate. However, if the plywood is delaminated very deeply, think about where the epoxy and filler will go. In our Fu Hwa, such a place would be on to the top of the shower ceiling (been thinking about fixing my similar problem).

+1 to the folks who favor epoxying over contact cement. Dropping the laminate correctly onto the contact cement will be a chore what with the inward-sloping window surround, even with slip sheets, rollers or such tricks.

I've successfully done lots of plastic laminate and wood veneer using contact cement. I moved over to the epoxy side about 20 years ago. Use your epoxy slightly filled/thickened so that any voids from imperfect clamping/ballasting will be avoided

+1 to the folks who wonder about color and reflectivity. Try placing a large sample of something similar and drive around.

+1 to the folks who suggest a laminate with 'body' like plywood or Starboard. You'd care less about how perfect your repair of the substrate was.
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Old 08-28-2016, 11:49 AM   #33
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That is amazing!
Great to know. Thanks!
Bruce
Couple of tricks not shown in the video we made are to sand both surfaces you are going to glue together before heating them with a torch. And heat the surfaces a bit longer than it shows in the video.

Basically you need to aneal (sp)? the surfaces before you glue them. Just as you do when using King Plastics proprietary Starboard glue.

P2-10 is great for gluing almost anything very quickl and strongly. Use it a lot for wood work. And it comes in various thicknesses.
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Old 08-28-2016, 11:57 AM   #34
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After reading this thread, I looked on my dash for the edges of a repair done with a piece of teak plywood, 10 or so years ago. Couldn't find the spot. After a short time, the new teak veneers will fade to the same colours as the side by side original. All you will need to do is get the edges to fit properly, after choosing the correct thickness. Contact cement works here, as would epoxy or even white carpenter's glue.
If I had to do the whole dash, not just a small repair, I would also use a thin teak plywood. That would return the dash to its original look, better at resale time, and avoid the "if this crappy looking repair is typical....".
Not that some boats didn't come with formica, mine has formica in the heads, but usually the dash is treated to much nicer looking materials, being somewhat of a show-off spot.
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Old 08-28-2016, 02:26 PM   #35
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Using a filler over an already compromised substrate is not a good idea.I used to make countertops as part of my business,and no manufacturer will advise that.Fillers like dash patch are on meant for small imperfections,not a resurfacing project.If you think the glue that holds the other layers of the existing ply are any more sound than the one that has been compromised,you are sorely mistaken.If you cant remove then entire substrate,them you can laminate a piece of 5mm ply over it using a two part epoxy along with mechanical fasteners.The fasteners need to be long enough that go thru the new and old substrate attaching to whatever framing is available,then fill the fastener voids with dash patch,and sand smooth with 120 grit sandpaper(no finer) ,and then you can apply your finished surface.
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Old 08-28-2016, 02:36 PM   #36
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Try this tub surround material from Home Depot. It's thick enough to hide rough surfaces
if you don't mind the texture.
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Old 08-28-2016, 04:25 PM   #37
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Try this tub surround material from Home Depot. It's thick enough to hide rough surfaces
if you don't mind the texture.
Thst stuff is great for a lot of things.

But it's about the last stuff you'd want to use on the dash of a helm where you'd be running the boat at night.

White and shiny!
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Old 08-28-2016, 04:37 PM   #38
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Thst stuff is great for a lot of things.

But it's about the last stuff you'd want to use on the dash of a helm where you'd be running the boat at night.

White and shiny!
Krylon plastic paint from Home Depot also ... any colour .... make it look like low gloss leather if you want.
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Old 08-28-2016, 05:24 PM   #39
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Lots of guessing what is there and what needs to be done to get to a solid, smooth structure..if one is there at all.

After that...lots of ways to do it...lots of products to use. Easy or hard for both method and material.

About the only consistent truth is .....white antything at the helm is really never a good idea.
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Old 08-28-2016, 05:57 PM   #40
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IG used a woodgrain simulated "Formica" type finish on the area the OP is reworking. It mimics wood, has a dull non reflective finish(maybe a more reflective satin 35 years ago). The Estate executor I bought from thought a nasty finish,I see it as a sensible long life compromise. It responds well to low sheen Armor all.
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