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Old 06-14-2014, 05:07 PM   #21
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Why not?

I think the run from Norfolk to NY or reverse is BEST done in westerly or northwesterly winds?????

I'm confused why wouldn't you as it's a great beach hugging run....especially once north of Chincoteague.
Absolutely correct, anything with a westerly component, the more north-ish the better. You can ride the Jersey shore quite close to shore for much of its length, paying attention to the inlets.

Yes the Chesapeake can get nasty if you ignore the weather, but it has so many more options to duck in and provide shelter and services. Having made the trip outside for time's sake, I always regretted and missed not being able to cruise and explore the Chessie more instead and gave myself demerits.
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Old 06-14-2014, 11:47 PM   #22
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I used to travel a lot of that area with a 40 ft round bottom 3.5 ft draft. My advise if you don't know inlets and even if you do stay inside. Your boat is too slow for running inlets or making distance to next inlet if weather turns bad.
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Old 06-15-2014, 08:47 AM   #23
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I used to travel a lot of that area with a 40 ft round bottom 3.5 ft draft. My advise if you don't know inlets and even if you do stay inside. Your boat is too slow for running inlets or making distance to next inlet if weather turns bad.
Sorry... but have to disagree...the area is travelled by thousands of snowbirders and home to even more boats of exactly the same description...power and sail...

All do just fine if they watch the weather and make reasonably sound decisions.

The inlets identified as easy are negotiated by rowboats and kayakers on a regular basis and hardly a challenge for any powered trawler in all but the most extreme conditions...the secondary inlets are a little trickier but still OK for all but true novice.

While not every few miles...there are few places along the Atlantic seaboard that offers terrific inlets close together.
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Old 06-15-2014, 02:51 PM   #24
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I have never seen so Many Bugs, the Chesapeake was worst so far on my trip from Tampa to the Keys and up the ICW but the Delaware river is disgusting. I think the bugs eat DEET and RAID is a perfume. I can dodge the logs, Trees and telephone poles in brown ugly water and fight the strong currents or plan around it. But the bugs are not stop.!
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Old 06-15-2014, 03:11 PM   #25
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And Tow Boat US had to cut the chain on my anchor, what kind should I buy? :-)
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Old 06-15-2014, 08:24 PM   #26
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Sorry... but have to disagree...the area is travelled by thousands of snowbirders and home to even more boats of exactly the same description...power and sail...

All do just fine if they watch the weather and make reasonably sound decisions.

The inlets identified as easy are negotiated by rowboats and kayakers on a regular basis and hardly a challenge for any powered trawler in all but the most extreme conditions...the secondary inlets are a little trickier but still OK for all but true novice.

While not every few miles...there are few places along the Atlantic seaboard that offers terrific inlets close together.
Just wondering if you ever came in Manasquan or Barnqagat inlets when tide and wind was opposed and if you have ever Hit bottom or broached or seen a boat broach in these inlets? Why do people line up to watch boats enter Manasquan when wind and waves kick up? And Manasquan is one of the better inlets. While I did not spend a lot of time at the inlets I did see and experience both broach and hitting the bottom so my advise to someone inexperienced in dealing with these inlets in a boat that can not ride the back of a wave is to use caution. The posters boat is shoal enough to go inside and while not the fastest route certainly the safest. I would not compare a sail boat off shore in this area to the type of power boat of poster. A sound sailboat with able crew can make outside passage with fair comfort and faster than inside. A rolly polly power boat as posted a very different story. I owned a boat like that and did outside legs now and then but was very careful with weather and was experienced at running inlets and had local knowledge all not present as best I can tell on part of OP.
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Old 06-15-2014, 08:53 PM   #27
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Just wondering if you ever came in Manasquan or Barnqagat inlets when tide and wind was opposed and if you have ever Hit bottom or broached or seen a boat broach in these inlets? Why do people line up to watch boats enter Manasquan when wind and waves kick up? And Manasquan is one of the better inlets. While I did not spend a lot of time at the inlets I did see and experience both broach and hitting the bottom so my advise to someone inexperienced in dealing with these inlets in a boat that can not ride the back of a wave is to use caution. The posters boat is shoal enough to go inside and while not the fastest route certainly the safest. I would not compare a sail boat off shore in this area to the type of power boat of poster. A sound sailboat with able crew can make outside passage with fair comfort and faster than inside. A rolly polly power boat as posted a very different story. I owned a boat like that and did outside legs now and then but was very careful with weather and was experienced at running inlets and had local knowledge all not present as best I can tell on part of OP.
I have heard of problems and flew on rescues there...but I never have had a problem myself...guess either judgement or skill never made either a problem.

I am a commercial captain in NJ so I have a pretty good handle on NJ inlets..they can be bad...but rarely THAT bad.

I wasn't trying to compare sailboats to power offshore..that would be silly...I meant running inlets where they exhibit similar tendencies...maybe the sailboats a little worse off due to draft and waiting for bridges in a case or two.

But the real proof is that the vast majority of cruisers recommend NOT taking the NJ ICW due to shoaling and thousands run it offshore and negotiate the inlets just fine.
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Old 06-15-2014, 09:29 PM   #28
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We are now in the Hudson River half way between NY city and Troy. We have been on the go for almost a year covering about 4500 miles. The three worst transit days we had were in the Chesapeake and an overnight on the gulf. We are stabilized heavy and comfortable but I would not do the trip you are planning in a 36' round hull boat .

Your weather windows are not long enough, even today coming up the Hudson NOAA predicted at 10 to 15 and we saw 25 several times with some nice swell.

As they say in Carabelle just add it all together when NOAA predicts 10 to 15 that means 25 and 2 to 3 means 5 ft seas.

Go the long way enjoy the time and watch the weather like a hawk and play the current for a fun sleigh ride.
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Old 06-15-2014, 09:32 PM   #29
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as they say in carrabelle just add it all together when noaa predicts 10 to 15 that means 25 and 2 to 3 means 5 ft seas.
lol! :-)
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Old 06-15-2014, 09:37 PM   #30
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From this past Saturday to next Friday the are a combo of days of light winds and winds 10-15 G 20. All with westerly component...it would have been a perfect 6 days to make it from Norfolk to NY if you are willing to hug the coast.

The only better conditions would have been flat calm.

The inlet here at Townsends Inlet today was perfect....and it's not one of the better inlets along the trip.
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