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Old 11-04-2013, 06:29 PM   #21
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Baker-the USCG right to enforce the applicable laws does not rest on whether or the boat is documented. Its jurisdiction extends to all boats on navigable waters of the US. Every boat, regardless of whether documented or not, has to abide by the laws/regs regarding safety equipment, etc. The USCG has the right to board and inspect for that. One note, generally, the USCG does not have the unfettered right to "search" your boat without some probable cause to do so. For example, they cannot board to check safety gear and then start opening cabinets or pulling up hatches. They have to either have outside information to go beyond the usual safety check or they have see something "in plain sight" while doing the safety check to be able to undertake a full search. Note also that the right to board for the safety check extends to pretty much anywhere in the world. Any US registered vessel, whether documented or state registered, is considered a little piece of the US floating around in the ocean, so the USC can board anywhere.

On a fun note, I have seen two yachts and one large (500'+) ship where the USCG and the DEA were convinced there were drugs hidden on board and after they finished searching, the boats were not a pretty sight. Pretty much torn to shreds. On the ship, they tore up deck plates, pulled just about all the piping out, they must have done $millions in damage.
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Old 11-04-2013, 07:03 PM   #22
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Lots of good advice above. Whatever you think it will cost, it will likely be more, so make a contingency allowance. A boat kept on a trailer should reduce outgoings, not just for a mooring or slip, but it gives you the opportunity to do work at home at leisure with ready access to tools, home workshop, etc. Your greatest cost will probably be in the first year or so as you put things right, how you like them.
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Old 11-04-2013, 08:46 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by THD View Post
Baker-the USCG right to enforce the applicable laws does not rest on whether or the boat is documented. Its jurisdiction extends to all boats on navigable waters of the US. Every boat, regardless of whether documented or not, has to abide by the laws/regs regarding safety equipment, etc. The USCG has the right to board and inspect for that. One note, generally, the USCG does not have the unfettered right to "search" your boat without some probable cause to do so. For example, they cannot board to check safety gear and then start opening cabinets or pulling up hatches. They have to either have outside information to go beyond the usual safety check or they have see something "in plain sight" while doing the safety check to be able to undertake a full search. Note also that the right to board for the safety check extends to pretty much anywhere in the world. Any US registered vessel, whether documented or state registered, is considered a little piece of the US floating around in the ocean, so the USC can board anywhere.

On a fun note, I have seen two yachts and one large (500'+) ship where the USCG and the DEA were convinced there were drugs hidden on board and after they finished searching, the boats were not a pretty sight. Pretty much torn to shreds. On the ship, they tore up deck plates, pulled just about all the piping out, they must have done $millions in damage.
Correct...a lot of people don't realize the difference in boarding for a safety check and a "search"....

I'm pretty sure (well in the old days when I was in the thick of it)...if drugs or contraband aren't found...you can send a bill for damages done....that's why in very few instances the destructive searching starts untill positive and substantial probable cause exists...IE...at least some trace of contraband is found.
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Old 11-05-2013, 12:18 AM   #24
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IIRC, it's title 14, section 89 of the US Code that gives the Coast Guard the ability to (SEASII) Search, Examine, Arrest, Inspect, & Interrogate.
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Old 11-05-2013, 12:44 AM   #25
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Interesting stuff guys worthy of its own thread but hardly applicable to the OP's question. He asked if an inspection was needed before use, nothing about search, seizure or narcotics law

Josan, no Coast Guard inspection is needed prior to taking your boat out. There are courtesy inspections offered by the CG Auxiliary and Power Squadron groups that are voluntary but beneficial to boaters, especially newer ones. Those same two groups offer basic seamanship classes that are also very worthwhile to attend offered nationwide at various locations.
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Old 11-05-2013, 06:12 AM   #26
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that's why in very few instances the destructive searching starts untill positive and substantial probable cause exists...IE...at least some trace of contraband is found.


Dockside boats have been shredded because a dog barked as it walked the dock.
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Old 11-05-2013, 06:04 PM   #27
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Interesting stuff guys worthy of its own thread but hardly applicable to the OP's question. He asked if an inspection was needed before use, nothing about search, seizure or narcotics law

Josan, no Coast Guard inspection is needed prior to taking your boat out. There are courtesy inspections offered by the CG Auxiliary and Power Squadron groups that are voluntary but beneficial to boaters, especially newer ones. Those same two groups offer basic seamanship classes that are also very worthwhile to attend offered nationwide at various locations.
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