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Old 02-14-2016, 01:14 PM   #41
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what do you mean by because it seems that a lot changes once you crack the 50' barrier what changes ??
A 50-something foot boat is (obviously) just bigger. Not only some number of feet longer but more beam and taller-more square feet of fiberglass.
More boat to wash, wax, paint, more windows to stop leaks, more sunbrella fabric, etc.
Bigger zincs, bigger shafts, propellers (more expensive).
A fifty-something boat at the waterline requires a 60' slip/dockage after adding swim platform, anchor overhang, etc--these are harder to find, cost more.

Depending on configuration of boat can be more difficult for 2 people to handle while docking, anchoring--walkaround, widebody, semi-widebody, all on one level, different levels, access to dock and dinghy (which you have mentioned) especially when mobility might be a little limited.
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Old 02-14-2016, 01:36 PM   #42
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Haylands,
Try "BoatDesign.net".
Sorry
Thanks, I'll have a read..... we got there in the end

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I'll tell ya all I know for a "dollar three eighty - plus tax"! That's just an old NY joke. I'll tell you what I know for free. PM me if you want my phone number. Been boating on many types of boats for decades. - Cheers! Art
Art, Very kind offer, I'll read all these books and sites that have been recommended and see how I get on, if I need to I'll see if I can find a cheap international phone card and ring...

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Originally Posted by ktdtx View Post
A 50-something foot boat is (obviously) just bigger. Not only some number of feet longer but more beam and taller-more square feet of fiberglass.
More boat to wash, wax, paint, more windows to stop leaks, more sunbrella fabric, etc.
Bigger zincs, bigger shafts, propellers (more expensive).
A fifty-something boat at the waterline requires a 60' slip/dockage after adding swim platform, anchor overhang, etc--these are harder to find, cost more.

Depending on configuration of boat can be more difficult for 2 people to handle while docking, anchoring--walkaround, widebody, semi-widebody, all on one level, different levels, access to dock and dinghy (which you have mentioned) especially when mobility might be a little limited.
Thanks, I appreciate the bigger the boat the more it costs but the primary concern is how comfortable it is and how easy to do things on it, and bigger generally means better...

Access is one thing we will look at carefully, there seem to be some very poor designs in that respect, I'd also like a solid and strong gunwale.... our "must have" list is getting a bit long and I don't think the boat exists...

Welcome aboard, compromise....!!!
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Old 02-14-2016, 01:45 PM   #43
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Just a little thing to throw into the mix. Along the East Coast the recreational and some commercial fishing fleet is almost purely planning craft and SD(lobster type). These planning and SD boats go out in the open ocean 50-100 miles off shore(some stay for days) on a regular basis and often come back in through potentially dangerous inlets. I don't think it is fair to knock their seaworthiness against the new high sided trawler and cottage boat FD types.
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Old 02-14-2016, 02:07 PM   #44
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Jay Benford's Small Ships has the Florida Bay Coaster yachts. They come in many sizes but all are LARGE. Kind of like the previously suggested Highclere Castle only floating.
The book has everything except the full sized plans.
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Old 02-17-2016, 10:09 AM   #45
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Take a look at Great Harbour Trawlers - Great Harbour Trawlers: America's go-anyhere liveaboards, go to the "Great Design" tab and read Ken Fickett's treatise on "Trawler Truths". There is such a thing as a hard chine, full displacement hull form. As long as you are comfortable with a 7.5 knot cruise speed, features like the shallow draft and twin engines make this a pretty compelling option for the type of cruising you describe. Not ALL Full Displacement trawlers roll at anchor!
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Old 02-17-2016, 12:06 PM   #46
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Barges are hard chine (90 degrees) and are very stable.
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Old 02-17-2016, 12:21 PM   #47
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Barges are hard chine (90 degrees) and are very stable.
Hilarious - Eric
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Old 02-17-2016, 12:26 PM   #48
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Haylands,
Just read thru the posts in this thread. First thing that came to mind which hasn't been brought up: With your medical history, you may want to pay close attention to engine room layout. You will end up doing some maintenance yourself, sometimes underway. A stand up engine room may be much more comfortable for you guys.

We have a 60' FD hull. Rolling at anchor is not an issue. In any case you could always deploy paravanes if you wanted to.

I think you'll find the motion of a full displacement easier overall, but I would counsel you to take as many boats out as possible to get a feel for it.

Last point, Maintining a 60' boat is a labor of love, or deep pockets (sometimes both). We usually break down cleaning into a 4 day process:
Day one: teak decks (I'd steer you away from these personally)
Day two: Hull
Day three: stainless and windows
Day four: interior
The key is not to let it get away from you. Much easier to maintain than to get up to par. In any event, look closely at interiors, you may find out that you'd be better served with a somewhat smaller boat that would be easier to maintain.
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Old 02-17-2016, 12:30 PM   #49
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Try it in a beam sea proportional in size to the size that would
make Willy roll badly.

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Old 02-17-2016, 01:33 PM   #50
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Haylands,
Just read thru the posts in this thread. First thing that came to mind which hasn't been brought up: With your medical history, you may want to pay close attention to engine room layout. You will end up doing some maintenance yourself, sometimes underway. A stand up engine room may be much more comfortable for you guys.

We have a 60' FD hull. Rolling at anchor is not an issue. In any case you could always deploy paravanes if you wanted to.

I think you'll find the motion of a full displacement easier overall, but I would counsel you to take as many boats out as possible to get a feel for it.

Last point, Maintining a 60' boat is a labor of love, or deep pockets (sometimes both). We usually break down cleaning into a 4 day process:
Day one: teak decks (I'd steer you away from these personally)
Day two: Hull
Day three: stainless and windows
Day four: interior
The key is not to let it get away from you. Much easier to maintain than to get up to par. In any event, look closely at interiors, you may find out that you'd be better served with a somewhat smaller boat that would be easier to maintain.
Well put
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Old 02-17-2016, 03:00 PM   #51
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Try it in a beam sea proportional in size to the size that would
make Willy roll badly.

Ted
I assume you meant my Willy Ted. W/O power in even 2' seas she rolls badly. Had an engine out and working on it one leg over each side was extremely difficult. Even worse w both legs on one side. Didn't really get over it physically and completely for a month or two. Just the wrong perion I guess. Put an anchor out w 100' or so of line but it wouldn't put her head to the wind.
But underway most all the time roll can be controlled to an acceptable level by small course changes. There are times when you've just got to buck up and bear it .... like in a narrow channel w other boats.
Hassen't happened to me but being just to windward of a ship w even a small sea could be bad. However I actually did that w a 16' OB and she ran really smooth. Never have been able to explain that. The waves were jumping up and down from the reflected waves ..... I went up and down to be sure but practically no roll. Wave frequency .. roll period .. I assume.
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Old 02-17-2016, 05:54 PM   #52
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Yep Eric, I meant yours.
Take a sea that is bad for Willy, scale it up proportionally to that
barge and i don't think you will be comfortable on it either.

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Old 02-17-2016, 07:09 PM   #53
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Thanks for the posts, all info gratefully received...

No Mast..

I will be doing all the repairs and servicing on the boat, I'm not one to sit about and do nothing for long... I'm also a bit OCD so staying on top of things is a religion... I take your point about a size easier to maintain but am of the opinion that the bigger the better (to a point) The easier it is for me to get around, through, under and over things the better it will be, there don't seem to be many boats under 50 ft that have the space we want and a walk in ER... The boss and I like our space so we were never going to end up with a "normal" size boat for 2....
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