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Old 05-13-2016, 08:50 AM   #41
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Motor Vessel (MV)

I second MV
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Old 05-13-2016, 09:45 AM   #42
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One reminder: a boat is only a "sailing vessel" when it is actually under sail. If motoring then it is a "power-driven vessel" like any other motorboat. Them's the rules.

I'd also add ytjat in 46 CFR Ch.1, Subpart 24.10-1, the CG definition of "motor vessel" is "any vessel more than 65 feet propelled by machinery other than steam" and a "motorboat" is such a vessel of less than 65 feet, if one wants to legalistic about things.
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Old 05-13-2016, 09:57 AM   #43
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One reminder: a boat is only a "sailing vessel" when it is actually under sail. If motoring then it is a "power-driven vessel" like any other motorboat. Them's the rules.

I'd also add ytjat in 46 CFR Ch.1, Subpart 24.10-1, the CG definition of "motor vessel" is "any vessel more than 65 feet propelled by machinery other than steam" and a "motorboat" is such a vessel of less than 65 feet, if one wants to legalistic about things.
I bet Northern Spy wished he had posted that!
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Old 05-13-2016, 10:08 AM   #44
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One reminder: a boat is only a "sailing vessel" when it is actually under sail. If motoring then it is a "power-driven vessel" like any other motorboat. Them's the rules.

I'd also add ytjat in 46 CFR Ch.1, Subpart 24.10-1, the CG definition of "motor vessel" is "any vessel more than 65 feet propelled by machinery other than steam" and a "motorboat" is such a vessel of less than 65 feet, if one wants to legalistic about things.
Actually if we're going to get all lawyered up then a vessel with sails and a motor is an "auxiliary sailing vessel" according to 46 CFR 170-055(a).

The problem is that these legal definitions are not what people use on the radio. Of all the terms mentioned here, no one has said they use "Motorboat" - which is what the vast majority of us have.

I tend to use just "Stillwater" with other pleasure craft. If I'm calling VTS or a bridge I'll say "Motor Vessel Stillwater". If I change my habits it may be just to drop the title altogether. I can't see saying "Motor Yacht Stillwater"

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Old 05-13-2016, 10:14 AM   #45
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Of all the terms mentioned here, no one has said they use "Motorboat" - which is what the vast majority of us have.
I do, though usually cheat and use "power boat" if at all (see my first post on the subject) "motor vessel": never , even though technically we came close with a 61ft LOA. "Motor Yacht" also never, even though our boat's official model name was "56 Motoryacht"
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Old 05-13-2016, 10:43 AM   #46
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There may be "rules" for what to call your vessel, but there's no enforcement so you are free to use whatever suits you ego or better yet, what you think the person you are talking to will understand.


Approaching a bridge you want opened, "sailing vessel XYZ" is going to work the best even though you have no sails up and are operating under power. "Motor vessel XYZ" works for boats without a mast.
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Old 05-13-2016, 03:25 PM   #47
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There may be "rules" for what to call your vessel, but there's no enforcement so you are free to use whatever suits you ego or better yet, what you think the person you are talking to will understand.


Approaching a bridge you want opened, "sailing vessel XYZ" is going to work the best even though you have no sails up and are operating under power. "Motor vessel XYZ" works for boats without a mast.
Why not just "sailboat"? Two less syllables and that's what 99% of the world calls it. "Motorboat" or "power boat" also save a syllable and are more familiar to the general public (which includes most bridge tenders).

I am reminded of the time someone a ways away, around a bend, hailed a bridge that was about to open identifying themselves as a "trawler". In that part of the Carolinas, that term means one thing, a fishing or shrimping trawler. So the guy held the opening, expecting a commercial boat. Right before a little Mainship like 34-ish motorboat came around the bend, the tender radioed out to the "trawler" asking for their ETA.. she replied "this is us, coming in view now", about a mile or so up stream. He opened the bridge immediately, and his reply to her was not one of amusement. I looked back right after we cleared he was closing the bridge right back up.
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Old 05-13-2016, 03:44 PM   #48
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Wadden,

I suspect that the pretentiousness of the word "yacht" is an American English/Culture issue. In the US, a "yacht" is often considered a rich man's boat.
Dan,
yes, seems to be different to the understanding here in the northern part of the old world.
When I hear "This M/V ..." on the VHF I consider a commercial ship calling with a size of at least of 80-100'. While "M/Y" is something significant smaller and for recreational purpose only. Without assuming that it has to be a very expensive vehicle.

Last not least: Aren't all we boaters rich - not in terms of money but by the adventure of boating? -


best regards / med venlig hilsen
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Old 05-13-2016, 10:29 PM   #49
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Both "motor vessels" or "sailing vessels" are "Pleasure craft" so to clarify we use "Motor vessel". We only use that term when communicating with VTS or when announcing a securite.


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Old 05-14-2016, 09:37 AM   #50
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Why not just "sailboat"? Two less syllables and that's what 99% of the world calls it. "Motorboat" or "power boat" also save a syllable and are more familiar to the general public (which includes most bridge tenders).

I am reminded of the time someone a ways away, around a bend, hailed a bridge that was about to open identifying themselves as a "trawler". In that part of the Carolinas, that term means one thing, a fishing or shrimping trawler. So the guy held the opening, expecting a commercial boat. Right before a little Mainship like 34-ish motorboat came around the bend, the tender radioed out to the "trawler" asking for their ETA.. she replied "this is us, coming in view now", about a mile or so up stream. He opened the bridge immediately, and his reply to her was not one of amusement. I looked back right after we cleared he was closing the bridge right back up.
Most bridge tenders are fine but some are ********. If your boat was advertised and sold as a "trawler", how would you expect the owner to call it something different?

The only people who have ever given me grief for calling my boat a "trawler" are the "know-it-alls" on web forums and they are virtual people, not real life people.


BTW: This is the "Trawler Forum".
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Old 05-14-2016, 09:55 AM   #51
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Here in South Florida we use "hey a$$hole" a lot.
Wouldn't that be "Estķpido!" in South Florida?
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Old 05-14-2016, 10:50 AM   #52
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I usually just go with the name. If additional information is needed, I just go with power boat. I use motor vessel at work, and tend to associate that with something big.
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Old 05-16-2016, 08:19 PM   #53
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Use whatever you want.

The 'official' description from the FCC handbook is:
"You may use channel 16 to call a ship or shore station, but if you do so, you must, must be brief! We recommend this same procedure be used over channel 9, if channel 9 is used as a calling channel.
For example:

Blue Duck: "Mary Jane, this is Blue Duck" (the name of the vessel or MMSI being called may be said 2 or 3 times if conditions warrant)

Mary Jane: "Blue Duck, this is Mary Jane. Reply 68" (or some other proper working channel)

Blue Duck: "68" or "Roger"

Note: No special vessel identifier, No special prefix. Just as with AIS embedding. The name is supposed to be JUST the name.

There are several vessels running around with misnamed info on AIS. I suppose it 'makes their ego feel good'. Some examples, S/V Penelope, Or ATB Lucy, Or Tug Thedore. You are supposed to use just your vessel name. If you have to (upon switching to a working channel) further identify yourself, knock your socks off. People like to hear themselves talk. (or type)

A guy I know in New York often catches the newbie who yaps too long on 13 giving a hugely inflated securitee' call about where, what and how he's going to his destination over an hour away. The response is: "What'd ya have for breakfast" which is met with silence. Works wonders. Brevity is max.
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Old 05-16-2016, 09:01 PM   #54
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Why the hell are recreational boaters issuing securite calls?

In this neck of the woods, with Naval Station Mayport, Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Coast Guard Station Jacksonville, and a major east coast port, anyone else issuing a securite would be hammered.
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Old 05-16-2016, 09:05 PM   #55
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Use whatever you want.

The 'official' description from the FCC handbook is:
"You may use channel 16 to call a ship or shore station, but if you do so, you must, must be brief! We recommend this same procedure be used over channel 9, if channel 9 is used as a calling channel.
For example:

Blue Duck: "Mary Jane, this is Blue Duck" (the name of the vessel or MMSI being called may be said 2 or 3 times if conditions warrant)

Mary Jane: "Blue Duck, this is Mary Jane. Reply 68" (or some other proper working channel)

Blue Duck: "68" or "Roger"

Note: No special vessel identifier, No special prefix. Just as with AIS embedding. The name is supposed to be JUST the name.
I like it. Now that I think about it, something I should do more often, when I hail a tow on the ICW or ship channel, I never use anything other than their name. So why not just use my name.

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Old 05-16-2016, 09:06 PM   #56
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Most bridge tenders are fine but some are ********. If your boat was advertised and sold as a "trawler", how would you expect the owner to call it something different?

The only people who have ever given me grief for calling my boat a "trawler" are the "know-it-alls" on web forums and they are virtual people, not real life people.


BTW: This is the "Trawler Forum".
You don't understand the reason he was pi**ed, do you?

Regardless, like him, yes, like him, I do expect someone to know what kind of boat they are in beyond what it was "advertised" to them.
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Old 05-16-2016, 09:21 PM   #57
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Identifying your boat on the radio

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Originally Posted by menzies View Post
Why the hell are recreational boaters issuing securite calls?

In this neck of the woods, with Naval Station Mayport, Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Coast Guard Station Jacksonville, and a major east coast port, anyone else issuing a securite would be hammered.

Narrow channels in the fog. Do it on those occasions. I had a fellow come on right away to arrange a safe pass, Red to Red.

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Old 05-16-2016, 09:26 PM   #58
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Why the hell are recreational boaters issuing securite calls?

It would depend on the size of the port I'd guess. Or blind corners. Or restricted channels. Or high current areas. Or fog. Or rain. Or at night. Or people who don't want to get run over.

That is the reason for taking the USCG small boat course. So we know what mayday, pan pan and securite' are for.

My earlier comment was describing commercial channel 13 chatter, That some don't get the 'brevity' part.

Call signs?! What the heck are they??
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Old 05-16-2016, 09:46 PM   #59
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It is my understanding that a securite call is for debris in the water, impending severe weather, or for the movement of large vessels, and not something that recreational vessels should be using.

If a recreational vessel is adrift and in itself becomes a navigational hazard then I can see the use of a securite.

But for announcing a recreational vessel movement? Egotistical at best.

If you are in dense fog (restricted visibility) then a blast of your horn is a much more effective defense than a Securite where no one knows where the hell you are.

Check rule 35.
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Old 05-16-2016, 10:05 PM   #60
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Identifying your boat on the radio

The point of a securite' call is to announce your presence and intentions. This eliminates the confusion. I don't see your worry about using the radio to ensure safety. In fog signals must be used. But they don't exchange info like actually communicating.

I routinely hear yachts in fog (sometimes in rain or darkness) using securite' calls at choke points( the Race, East River, mouths of harbors with ship tug traffic). I can't see how this is bad or to be ridiculed!?
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