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Old 04-14-2016, 11:02 PM   #61
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Lets get real. Lets talk about open ocean boats that most of us can afford.
Simple, they're called sailboats and can be had almost anywhere for less than $50K. But I digress, this is a powerboat forum.
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Old 04-14-2016, 11:07 PM   #62
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Simple, they're called sailboats and can be had almost anywhere for less than $50K. But I digress, this is a powerboat forum.
Yup and Yup!!
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Old 04-14-2016, 11:16 PM   #63
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Eric

Unless I read your implications incorrectly; I believe you look through a glass darkly, to an extent, regarding sea-kindly hull designs available for ocean crossing "small" yachts.

You consistently imply how you feel hard chines, on any portion of a hull, makes for poor handing in wind/storm disruptive seas. I believe that hull designs incorporating forms/shapes of both round bilge displacement type and hard chine planning effects in different hull sections can be excellent for small yacht handling in sea conditions... short of hurricane fed, breaking waves above 30' tall.

Properly mixed hull design I just stated IMO would in general be applicable to boats in the below 100' dimension. Boats larger than that become a weight mass that alters bad weather handling capabilities. Big Ships are a completely different item... in that their deep draft, wll, and enormous weight shifts the entire paradigm for handling in disruptive deep sea conditions.

Art
Let's note too that boats like Flemings have stabilizers, have hulls that have been refined over decades, have very low centers of gravity.
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Old 04-14-2016, 11:17 PM   #64
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Lets get real. Lets talk about open ocean boats that most of us can afford.
I don't think the OP cared about affordability with his question.
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Old 04-14-2016, 11:26 PM   #65
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ok I'll ask. What does a new Watson 72 run ? And are they new? Cant find any used ones for sale...
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Old 04-14-2016, 11:44 PM   #66
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ok I'll ask. What does a new Watson 72 run ? And are they new? Cant find any used ones for sale...
My best estimate is $5 million. That may be low. They were quoting around $3.5 plus export in 2009.
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Old 04-14-2016, 11:48 PM   #67
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ok I'll ask. What does a new Watson 72 run ? And are they new? Cant find any used ones for sale...
I saw this on one forum - a 2009 posting:

"A few months ago Pete Watson gave a bid to construct a new Watson 72 for $4,800,000.00 NZ and a Watson 79 for $6,250,000.00 NZ plus an export fee of 12 % for a foreign buyer."

Cape Horn Yachts - Cape Horn Yacht | YachtForums: We Know Big Boats!

But that seems way low. I seem to remember seeing a review article in a magazine (PassageMaker?) on the Watson 72 and think it was more like 2 to 3 times that price.
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Old 04-14-2016, 11:48 PM   #68
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Not many on the used market only means the owners tend to hang on to them. There is a 60' on the web site being tentatively open for offers of interest as apparently the owner is considering a new Watson build. It is encouraging to see the builder state all Watson's new or used receive full factory support for life.

How many used Dashew FPB's do you find on Yachtworld?
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Old 04-15-2016, 12:06 AM   #69
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Back in the earlier days of the internet, before the world wide web, forums existed on Usenet (). Actually it still exists. I used to participate regularly in a group called rec.photo. One of the questions that frequently came up from those new to the forum was "what is the best camera/lens for taking photographs of xyz?" The answer that invariably came back was "the one you have with you!" It turned out that this answer transcended a whole manner of criteria including cost and portability.

I feel that the same is somewhat true for this thread. The question posed without constraints has almost no meaningful answer. I've watched the youtube videos of the N120 delivery from Hong Kong to Vancouver on more than one occasion. It seems to fit the bill. In the case of (the other) Richard, a Krogen 42 was "the one he had with him!" - and it served him well.

I'm not saying that you should take any boat you have across an ocean. But in the end it's about motivation and not equipment. As a sailor I remember it was clear that there were two types of people who wanted to be full time cruisers - those that went and did it and those that stayed at the dock saving up enough money to go.

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Old 04-15-2016, 12:30 AM   #70
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How many used Dashew FPB's do you find on Yachtworld?
There are actually what appear to be three different Dashew 64 FPBs for sale right now, strangely enough:
FPB 64 ORCA Berthon International Yacht Sales & Brokerage


FPB 64 LOUP GRIS Berthon International Yacht Sales & Brokerage

FPB 64 BUFFALO NICKEL Berthon International Yacht Sales & Brokerage
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Old 04-15-2016, 12:39 AM   #71
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I saw this on one forum - a 2009 posting:

"A few months ago Pete Watson gave a bid to construct a new Watson 72 for $4,800,000.00 NZ and a Watson 79 for $6,250,000.00 NZ plus an export fee of 12 % for a foreign buyer."

Cape Horn Yachts - Cape Horn Yacht | YachtForums: We Know Big Boats!

But that seems way low. I seem to remember seeing a review article in a magazine (PassageMaker?) on the Watson 72 and think it was more like 2 to 3 times that price.
That was about $3.3 US Million. So, I think the $5 US Million is low. I'd revise my estimate to $6-7 US Million. That is including the export fee.
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Old 04-15-2016, 12:54 AM   #72
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Here is a well designed and well built 78' Aluminum trawler for $6 million.

2016 Wim Van der Valk 23.95 m Trawler Power Boat For Sale

Also, Ruby Yachts is building Bruce Roberts designs in steel in the US
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Old 04-15-2016, 12:58 AM   #73
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"The Fleming hull is a semi-displacement design with moderate deadrise, a fine entry forward and a hard-chined, modified V aft - all adding up to a yacht optimized for running most efficiently at 9 to 10 knots, but which can also cruise comfortably at up to 18 knots. A long keel provides directional stability as well as protection of the running gear. The generous flare of the bow and soft forward sections contribute to a comfortable, dry ride especially at passagemaking speeds. The hard chines not only provide lift at higher speeds, but they have an added benefit of creating a more stable boat when at anchor or at the dock."
That pretty much sums up the underbody shape of my previous boat, a 65ft Burger. Combine the above with lots of windage and big picture windows. It was absolutely NOT the ideal ocean crosser.

Yet, with a couple of 50 year old 6-71s it sailed Wisconsin to Hawaii a couple of times, the South Pacific to Australia. Under my ownership we cruised LA to Seattle back and forth and battled 25ft+ seas too many times.

Nobody told me or the previous owners that we couldn't do it. Or maybe I was just young and stupid???
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Old 04-15-2016, 01:09 AM   #74
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big blue water boat

What about a Northern marine 80?
Great sea boat.. around 3.5 to 4mil.
space for two skiffs

HOLLYWOOD
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Old 04-15-2016, 01:12 AM   #75
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Here is a well designed and well built 78' Aluminum trawler for $6 million.

2016 Wim Van der Valk 23.95 m Trawler Power Boat For Sale

Also, Ruby Yachts is building Bruce Roberts designs in steel in the US
Nice. I love the computer generated pictures of it photoshopped into exotic locations.

And it comes with a VCR. One would expect no less for $6M!

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Old 04-15-2016, 01:28 AM   #76
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That pretty much sums up the underbody shape of my previous boat, a 65ft Burger. Combine the above with lots of windage and big picture windows. It was absolutely NOT the ideal ocean crosser.

Yet, with a couple of 50 year old 6-71s it sailed Wisconsin to Hawaii a couple of times, the South Pacific to Australia. Under my ownership we cruised LA to Seattle back and forth and battled 25ft+ seas too many times.

Nobody told me or the previous owners that we couldn't do it. Or maybe I was just young and stupid???
Supposedly Burger actually has another recreational boat under construction. They've had a few years with only commercial boats. A 103' Explorer Model. We chartered a 113' Burger three years ago. The quality of workmanship was beyond reproach. We could never live with the speed or lack thereof. They did go astray in one boat around 2010-11 when they agreed to some things they had never done and never should have taken on. They've survived since with some tour boats and commercial boats. If I was looking for a steel boat, I'd strongly consider Burger. Don't know if they would ever again build anything under 100' though and that's a shame.

I hope this build goes well for them.
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Old 04-15-2016, 06:30 AM   #77
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I have made a number of offshore sail passages in the spring and fall from New England to the Carib.

Yes there are some days that are exquisite , but mostly its just 10-14 days of work.

If I win the lottery A "box boat" is in my cruising future.

A "box boat" will fit in a sea land big container,

while we will fit in seats in the aluminum overcast and greet the boat wherever we chose world wide.

I would use a Atkin style Sea Bright hull with box keel and reverse dead rise aft.

The box keel would allow a EZ loading or allow the boat to take the ground with ease.

Built in aluminum with a DL of 100 or less would allow higher transit speeds with realistic fuel burn.

A bow cockpit , a drop down transom , and a lowering Pilot House would be included.

Yes the boat will be 40 ft long and under 8 ft wide , but it should fit the bill.

Visit 10, feed 8 , sleep 4 and cruise 2 .

Let the boat spend time on the empty vast ocean , not the crew!
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Old 04-15-2016, 07:37 AM   #78
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Having an idea on price range would be good.
For the price of a Nordhavn 40 or 46 we bought our Cheoy Lee 66,not as good in a lot of respects however she has long legs 3000 miles @ 8.5 knots,we use about 23 lph at that speed,goes up to 35 lph at 10 knots.Max speed is 13 kts.
Plenty of H20 2700 litres.2 gennys.2 engines.Laundry with dryer.Heaps of room,3 double cabins,1 quad cabin.Proper bridge with settee.Lounge room and a dining table area.
Not as new as the Nordhavns however they are very livable.I find the Nordys in my price range too squeezy inside.
Oh,and one I can't leave home without is a walk in engine room with a workbench.So many boat have tight engine rooms.I was going to buy a Nordy 46 till they showed me the ER on a really hot day.
Actually the other thing that a round bilge boat like this really cannot be without is stabilisers ,Naiads in our case.We rarely roll much more that 10 to 15 degrees,turn them off and the excitement starts.
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Old 04-15-2016, 08:19 AM   #79
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Stornaway, I have always had a soft spot for those Cheoy Lee 66s. To me they are more like small ships, and the layout and engine room are great. In my next incarnation, if I'm born a bit richer than this time round, I think I'll buy one.
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Old 04-15-2016, 09:44 AM   #80
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I am kinda surprised that many are for sale. Sara Sara was/is for sale too.

At least one of the boats is being sold since the owners are buying one of the larger FPBs.

Later,
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