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Old 04-25-2016, 11:17 PM   #201
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The terms "lee shore" and "windward" or "ward shore" are nautical terms used to describe a stretch of shoreline. A lee shore is one that is to the lee side of a vessel — meaning the wind is blowing towards it. Wikipedia

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Old 04-25-2016, 11:18 PM   #202
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BandB,
No need to be pick'in on Mark.
It's quite obvious he means our boats are small .... compared to a cruise ship.
And he is correct. That is also my point that we all have different levels of what we'd consider crossing in. There are some like Mark who aren't crossing in any trawler, yacht, superyacht, or megayacht. There are a lot of very large boats that don't cross but go back and forth on ships. There are many boats represented here that I'm perfectly ok with the owner crossing on, but I wouldn't personally.

On the other hand, unlike Codger, I fully understand why one would cross in some of the boats represented here. It's always been in our plans to one day cross, but that's not coming anytime soon.
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Old 04-25-2016, 11:24 PM   #203
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lee (n.) Old English hleo "shelter, cover, defense, protection," from Proto-Germanic *khlewaz (cognates: Old Norse hle, Danish lś, Old Saxon hleo, Dutch lij "lee, shelter"). No known cognates outside Germanic; original sense uncertain and might have been "warm" (compare German lau "tepid," Old Norse hly "shelter, warmth"), which might link it to PIE *kele- (1) "warm." Nautical sense "that part of the hemisphere to which the wind is directed" (c. 1400) is from the notion of the side of the ship opposite that which receives the wind as the sheltered side. As an adjective, 1510s, from the noun.

leeward (adj.) 1660s, "situated away from the wind," on the opposite of the weather side of the ship; from lee + -ward.
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Old 04-25-2016, 11:38 PM   #204
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Because you can!
I suppose that some would agree with you but I'm not one of them. There are people on here with absolutely no ocean crossing experience posting how they would handle
heavy seas. Unbelievable!!!
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Old 04-25-2016, 11:47 PM   #205
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Originally Posted by manyboats View Post
Eagle419 wrote;
"The "windward shore" or upwind is where safety lies."
And PeterB wrote;
Aaah, Eric, are you sure you have your windwards and lees the right way round..? If you are heading into the seas, and land, you are heading towards a windward shore - the lee shore is in the direction of where the wind is heading to, not coming from, is it not..?

A lee shore is w wind blowing away from the land mass. A windward shore is w the wind blowing onshore or at the beach.

Unless I've got it backwards ....

In your original post you seemed to me to have it backwards - hence our comments.

Look up any nautical reference publications, passage guides, or just google the nautical term "lee shore" to see the (as used by me) context and description.
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Old 04-26-2016, 12:04 AM   #206
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I suppose that some would agree with you but I'm not one of them. There are people on here with absolutely no ocean crossing experience posting how they would handle
heavy seas. Unbelievable!!!
Actually, my reply was meant to be light hearted or witty. As in "Why would you climb Everest?" ... Because it's there! I guess I failed in that attempt or it was lost in translation - sorry.


It just comes down to the size of the risk we are all willing to take as explorers. Really no right or wrong - just what each individual is comfortable with and that is how it should be.
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Old 04-26-2016, 12:17 AM   #207
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I will admit, I have a bizarre fascination with big seas. I suppose I feel like I have something to prove, or maybe it's just suppressed juvenile aggression writ large, but I want to experience it. Maybe. I think.
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Old 04-26-2016, 12:25 AM   #208
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Originally Posted by RT Firefly View Post
lee (n.) Old English hleo "shelter, cover, defense, protection," from Proto-Germanic *khlewaz (cognates: Old Norse hle, Danish lś, Old Saxon hleo, Dutch lij "lee, shelter"). No known cognates outside Germanic; original sense uncertain and might have been "warm" (compare German lau "tepid," Old Norse hly "shelter, warmth"), which might link it to PIE *kele- (1) "warm." Nautical sense "that part of the hemisphere to which the wind is directed" (c. 1400) is from the notion of the side of the ship opposite that which receives the wind as the sheltered side. As an adjective, 1510s, from the noun.

leeward (adj.) 1660s, "situated away from the wind," on the opposite of the weather side of the ship; from lee + -ward.
RT, appreciate your dry humour, but just in case, 'lee shore' is a standard nautical term with a clear meaning to sailors.

When you break any standard phrase into individual words you can apply a different meaning.

For instance, the terms "aft deck", or "port quarter" have a clear meaning to me, but the dictionary meaning of the individual words doesn't give the non-sailor a clue.

Mind you some on here have called their aft deck a back veranda and I know what that means to them, so I guess it's all up for grabs.

I'd better stop now before I plummet into more Marin-esqe bloviation.
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Old 04-26-2016, 12:36 AM   #209
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Just to clarify on the whole lee shore thing:

I think some of the confusion is based on where you are. If you're on a boat, the lee shore is the one on your leeward side - with the wind blowing towards it. However, if you're on the island then it is called a windward shore, and it's on the windward side of the island. The wind is still blowing towards it.

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Old 04-26-2016, 12:52 AM   #210
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Now on the ocean crossing and heavy weather conversation:

I haven't crossed an ocean though I've been in some nasty stuff. I fully intend to cross one or more (the Pacific first) in my Krogen 54 when I retire. Maybe I'll do it and maybe I won't - only time will tell. If I had the resources to do it in a 100' boat then I'm sure I'd opt for it.

I think the "why?" question is interesting. I don't get why people don't get why people want to do this kind of thing (did that make sense?) We are all somewhat adventurous to be buying boats of various sizes and heading out on them. For some it's lakes and rivers, for others bays and sounds, for a smaller group it's coastal and for a tiny minority it's crossing oceans and circumnavigating. It's all just a question of scale. We're all doing it for the experience and enjoyment gained. It's obvious to me that the level that is too challenging for me is someone else's idea of a good time. Even Marin's dog knows that (where is he by the way?) (And where's Marin too?)

'nuff said.

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Old 04-26-2016, 12:58 AM   #211
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I will admit, I have a bizarre fascination with big seas. I suppose I feel like I have something to prove, or maybe it's just suppressed juvenile aggression writ large, but I want to experience it. Maybe. I think.
I'm thinking you are likely to be ready for it to end as soon as it really gets going, but then you simply have to keep going till it's over.

I'd prefer endless days of boring at sea than being in the midst of a really good blow.

What's the old saying about never meeting an atheist in a fox hole? It applies to sailors as well...
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Old 04-26-2016, 01:11 AM   #212
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Actually, my reply was meant to be light hearted or witty. As in "Why would you climb Everest?" ... Because it's there! I guess I failed in that attempt or it was lost in translation - sorry.


It just comes down to the size of the risk we are all willing to take as explorers. Really no right or wrong - just what each individual is comfortable with and that is how it should be.
I took yours as light hearted and witty.

As to the risk, I'm not a risk taker, but I am someone to work hard and figure out how to manage risks and minimize them. You're right that we all are different in comfort with various risks. There are things we do that others here wouldn't, but things others here do that I'd never consider.
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Old 04-26-2016, 01:13 AM   #213
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I think the "why?" question is interesting. I don't get why people don't get why people want to do this kind of thing (did that make sense?)
Wifey B: Why do chickens cross the road?
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Old 04-26-2016, 01:29 AM   #214
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Those of us unlikely to do it, except like me on a massive cruise ship, should be allowed and forgiven a little fantasizing.
And,what do atheists have against foxes?
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Old 04-26-2016, 01:43 AM   #215
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Those of us unlikely to do it, except like me on a massive cruise ship, should be allowed and forgiven a little fantasizing.
And,what do atheists have against foxes?
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Old 04-26-2016, 01:59 AM   #216
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I'm thinking you are likely to be ready for it to end as soon as it really gets going, but then you simply have to keep going till it's over.

I'd prefer endless days of boring at sea than being in the midst of a really good blow.

What's the old saying about never meeting an atheist in a fox hole? It applies to sailors as well...

Here are the three things you are thinking when you're in really bad conditions:

1) When will it end?
2) What if it gets worse?
3) What if something breaks?

Some risk won't stop me from going out, but I don't actively seek big seas.

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Old 04-26-2016, 03:18 AM   #217
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When getting into trouble from wind driven seas, and there is a piece of land available, you can take your boat into calmer conditions my traveling into the "lee of the land" where the land acts as a buffer between your boat and the wind. "Lee of the land" signifies that you are on the opposite (calm) side of land compared to the side of land being buffeted by oncoming winds (and waves). Thusly your boat becomes much more protected from wind driven waves while being in the "lee of the land" pressure-drop area.
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Old 04-26-2016, 04:06 AM   #218
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Lee Shore used to live 2 blocks from us. Or was that Harry?
A "lee shore" is that nasty place which looked so nice when you anchored,that you are going to get blown/washed onto by the now onshore wind and wind waves if your anchoring fails. A place best avoided.
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Old 04-26-2016, 04:21 AM   #219
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Quote:
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Those of us unlikely to do it, except like me on a massive cruise ship, should be allowed and forgiven a little fantasizing.
And,what do atheists have against foxes?
Yes, I was wondering about that bit as well.

However, the whys and wherefores about risk-taking is a fascinating subject. I put it down to imagination, or lack of it. By that I mean the ability of someone to imagine just what might go wrong, versus those who don't think about that so much. Then there's one's instinct for self-preservation. For example, lots of folk like sky-diving. My take on it is why would you want to jump out of a perfectly good aeroplane..? I also have no desire to climb mountains, as it is so damn cold, and is a long way down, and the view from a perfectly good aeroplane is even better and it's warm in there.

However, I must admit to a bit of an adrenaline buzz after weathering a nasty sea trip. But I have to admit the real buzz is when it's over, because it's a bit like hitting your head against a brick wall - it's great when you stop...
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Old 04-26-2016, 08:15 AM   #220
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Actually, my reply was meant to be light hearted or witty. As in "Why would you climb Everest?" ... Because it's there! I guess I failed in that attempt or it was lost in translation - sorry. .
No need to apologize as I did take it as such. It did, however, prompt me to address the difference between "planning to cross an ocean in a less than a 50ft vessel vs. fantasizing to cross the same ocean. I was in the Navy and crossed an ocean in a very nice vessel which I would do again, in a heart beat! We encountered seas of 25 feet or more with little trouble and I don't recall anyone suffering from sea sickness. Yes, the USS Enterprise was quite a ship!
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