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Old 05-27-2016, 12:28 PM   #21
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Wifey B's words of the day: Go younger for energy, go older for wisdom.
Does that mean your mid-80''s circumnavigator and young Oliver are anomalies as they seem to have both?
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Old 05-27-2016, 12:47 PM   #22
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Wifey B; the difference is you had the desire to learn, observe and listen and were not preoccupied playing with your phone and letting electronics take you for a ride.

Well said!!!
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Old 05-27-2016, 12:52 PM   #23
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Does that mean your mid-80''s circumnavigator and young Oliver are anomalies as they seem to have both?
Wifey B: No, you can have both...why, you may even? I don't know.
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Old 05-27-2016, 01:03 PM   #24
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Interesting comments all. Now I'll add mine.....


Youthful exuberance will never overcome old age wisdom and treachery.


It's not just the youngsters who are completely wrapped up in their electronics. A few years ago when I helped a guy my age take a boat from Seattle to Stockton, CA we had an interesting experience involving his electronics.


We were heading up the channel to Ilwaco, WA. It's a curvy channel, narrow, and it was getting on toward dusk. The owner had the helm and I was calling out the channel markers to him because they were hard to see. My wife does that for me and I appreciate it. He didn't and told me curtly to stop.


I just stepped back and watched him. He was glued to his electronic screens and had I not told him he was about to run aground, he would have. He was so intent on watching his screens he failed to notice he had tried to straighten out a curve and had run out of the channel. We were a boat length or so away from a grounding when I alerted him.


I not-so-politely told him if he'd been watching out the windshield instead of watching the screen that wouldn't have happened. I'd made my point so I just shut up.
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Old 05-27-2016, 01:17 PM   #25
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Interesting comments all. Now I'll add mine.....


Youthful exuberance will never overcome old age wisdom and treachery.


It's not just the youngsters who are completely wrapped up in their electronics. A few years ago when I helped a guy my age take a boat from Seattle to Stockton, CA we had an interesting experience involving his electronics.

Wifey B: Nothing wrong with the electronics. It's misuse of them as in the case you describe. We need to use all the tools available to us on the boat and in the world. I learned to handle a boat first on the lake. No electronics and when you're zooming around at 50+ knots, you learn to be fully aware of all your surroundings. An autopilot was like "whoa what? A machine is going to drive the boat?" to me. I try to open my mind to all the ways of doing things. But then I think most people of all generations do. Some of all generations are close minded too. Just the way humans are.
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Old 05-28-2016, 02:12 AM   #26
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Generational, racial, religious, and economic differences provide lots of fodder for generalizations. Times are definitely changing and Insometimes wonder at my son and daughters generation.

I feel that I am very fortunate. My entire career has been spent getting to know patients. Because of the nature of my practice, my patients range from infants to folks over 100 years old. I see some very wealthy folks, and some of the poorest. Politicians come into the office as well as homeless and the occasional prisoner accompanied by federal Marshals. In many cases I have seen these patients for decades and have gotten to know them well.

The point is, that all too often folks only spend their time around people like themselves. The folks in our neighborhoods, places of work, churches, yacht clubs, civic organizations are generally people like us. We don't often spend time around people that are different (family doesn't count).

Because I am spending a lot of time with all these different people, my attitudes and biases have been challenged. Of course I have developed new attitudes and new biases based on theses interactions.

Anyway, don't be too quick to right off large swathes of the population as beng a certain way. (Unless of course you run for President. Then it is required apparently.)
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Old 05-29-2016, 09:07 PM   #27
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Interesting responses all. Thanks to each of you for jotting down your thoughts, even those who disagreed with me.


I've been away from here for a couple of days to take care of our newest crew member Isla. Well, I didn't actually take care of her, but I did get to hold her for awhile. My wife, Tina was in Seattle to help her daughter with the delivery and all the other stuff that needs to be done in Mom's absence.


So, without further ado, here's our new grand daughter Isla Lucille with grandma....



Welcome aboard Sweetie!
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Old 05-29-2016, 09:53 PM   #28
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Old age and treachery will always beat youth and exuberance.
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Old 05-30-2016, 08:59 AM   #29
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Interesting responses all. Thanks to each of you for jotting down your thoughts, even those who disagreed with me.


I've been away from here for a couple of days to take care of our newest crew member Isla. Well, I didn't actually take care of her, but I did get to hold her for awhile. My wife, Tina was in Seattle to help her daughter with the delivery and all the other stuff that needs to be done in Mom's absence.


So, without further ado, here's our new grand daughter Isla Lucille with grandma....



Welcome aboard Sweetie!
Congratulations!

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Old 05-30-2016, 10:03 AM   #30
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Awww- baby pics!
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Old 05-30-2016, 11:24 AM   #31
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I just completed a top end rebuild on my Graymarine 327 a little fluff and buff on the varnish just ad pretty as it was when Lyman built it in 65. Continues to perform quite well, a pleasure to operate.
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Old 06-03-2016, 04:29 PM   #32
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Old 06-03-2016, 05:53 PM   #33
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>Being an old boater also has its benefits. My 50+ years of boating has given me a LOT of experiences I can call upon to help me do things like handle emergencies when they come up, or back the boat into the slip when the wind is blowing 25kts from the worst possible direction. My years of experience has taught me not to panic but to take my time and do it right, whether that takes a couple of ‘missed approaches’ where you pull back out and reposition the boat to make that near perfect landing.<

Agreed, and well said. Last month I had to come in on just one engine during a strong blow, and on the first pass it just wasn't working for me, and I was out of maneuvers. What I did was pick out a small patch of water I could just hold onto by little adjustments, and then waited until the boat pointed toward an opening of some sort. I crabbed straight out out, collected control, then took a clean run in, better steering, knowing what I had to do. Surprised myself, that technique of stabilizing in a small space. Necessity is a mother.
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Old 06-03-2016, 09:24 PM   #34
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Pucker factor 1-10?
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Old 06-03-2016, 09:57 PM   #35
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Pucker factor 1-10?
In the dark and the rain, as it was, steering only with starboard engine, it was a mother pucker.
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Old 06-03-2016, 10:57 PM   #36
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The distain for old ways is an epidemic.

That said and observing people using things like back up cameras and chain counters when their use is hardly benificial or not at all takes time and energy away from tried and proven stuff that should be learned and done.

That said there are wonderful things like anchor alarms, small boat radar and excellent depth sounders. Cell phones are a great aid to safety and many of the new anchors are better than what our fathers used.

But I disrespect people using things that are new and considered cool just because they are or/and snubbing things that are not the latest development or fad because they aren't new. Thinking inside the box limits one's vision to the inside of the box.

One of our members mentioned using a drone to check the sea conditions nearby but not visable. My knee-jerk reaction was "that's rediculous". He should go out and see. But a certian amount of self control is or may be necessary to prevent getting further and further into nasty conditions to the point where it really is dangerous. It takes experience to know if it's safe to proceed or if conditions are too poor. Add the knowledge of what the wind and tide will be in an hour or when you're "out there" and you're closser to knowing if it's safe to proceed. I "stuck my nose out" many times in places like Cape Caution and Dixion Entrance and benefit from some of those experiences .. and waded into what should have been my end once or twice. It should have been obvious to me but I thought too much about what the present was and did'nt think enough about what likely would happen in an hour. So many variables.

But younger folks should remember that sea stories are "stories" that are anywhere from totally genuine and factual to complete BS. And they lean to the BS side .. just like fish stories. And for the same reason and more. As a result people go to Alaska laden w fear and brag about survival after the deed. But most all the time w nothing to brag about except conquering their own fears. If all knew what a walk in the park the inside passage really is (most of the time) it wouldn't be a wilderness anymore.

One wonderful thing about being old is knowing a thing or two about this and that. Wind is wind and water is water all over the world. Quartering stern seas off the so coast of Africa or in Western Alaska are more alike than different .. kinda like people around the world. So as we get older there are fewer things to fear and more is understood. Add a few good electronic insturments and other things and age can be golden.
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Old 06-04-2016, 01:08 AM   #37
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So as we get older there are fewer things to fear and more is understood. Add a few good electronic instruments and other things and age can be golden.

Well put, my friend.
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Old 06-04-2016, 03:51 AM   #38
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Quote:
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The distain for old ways is an epidemic.
That said and observing people using things like back up cameras and chain counters when their use is hardly benificial or not at all takes time and energy away from tried and proven stuff that should be learned and done.
Maybe not the best of examples Eric. While I share your sentiments in a general sense, the things you mentioned, like so many other developments, are often only recognised as useful once used. I happen to feel my chain counter is one of the most useful items I have added to my boat, and if reversing cameras in vehicles with poor rear visibility were only for show, why are nearly every car manufacturer adding them as standard. If you had ever tried to back up in a tri-cabin boat, you might also think differently. Would you buy a car now with manual wind-up windows, is another example.

However, there is truth in what you say, as the basics should never be overlooked. That applies in all walks of life, not just boating. As evidenced by a recent tragedy we have just had in North Queensland, with a woman taken by a croc while swimming, but she was in an area where they are known to be - signs up everywhere - and it was 10 pm at night. Sensible basics don't change. Tragic, but totally preventable. You do not swim in croc infested waters, especially at night. Period.
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Old 06-04-2016, 09:28 AM   #39
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Way back when... now I'm talking here of the 17 and 18 hundreds, into and including mid 1900's... "mechanical and materiel technology" improvements were really getting under way. That time of humanity's life gained the moniker of Industrial Revolution.

Early 1900's suddenly Henry Ford created the production line... well, then... humans were off and running to see how fast we could build things... any things.

As societies improved living conditions in general there became more things to build and use as well as many more people alive to build em and use em.

Enter into 1990's. Oh boy... err girl... which ever title fits. Suddenly we'd passed the transistor age and entered into the chip age.

Then, low and behold, within 10 years we'd quickly entered into the super communications age.

Now we are entering into the molecular transferal and living tissue creation/development age. What astounding breakthroughs this run will give us.

Alan Greenspan coined a most apropos term for what humans do with all our devised items and ages passed through; i.e., "Creative Destruction"... self explanatory.

Soooo.... in regard to changes in boats... grin and bear it baby!! Cause... the Mayflower was state of the art when Columbus sailed the oceans blue. In 1977 the Tollycraft we own today was state of the art (she's still a really cool self contained play-toy motor boat). Today the boat in OP of this thread could be called state of the art for pleasure cruisers 2016.

Gaining years on me is fun. I get to watch all the good and bad and stupid and silly and great things that occur. Of course every once in a while there's a big hiccup... like Donald Trump... but, even that's fun to watch, in a macabre sort of way. He too will eventually pass by.

Smile good boater people!! - You're on a show called "Candid Lifestyle!!!

Who Knows What Tomorrow May Bring:

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Old 06-04-2016, 11:21 AM   #40
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PoPeterB,
Poor examples? Perhaps but the actual examples matter little. Boats most likely aren't the best example but most all areas of culture and toys get into the act .... everything that people do and have is game.

Chain length counters work but mostly for those that won't go out on the bow and get fully involved in the process. One can do it from the helm (or even the stern) but the counter is an alternative to markers whether electrical tape or commercial ties and if you're on the bow observing the elements of anchoring through observation counters aren't nessessary .. or even desirable?

The back up camera is more useful especially on larger boats. It would be stupid on my 30' sedan. Now it would actually be just a useless fad.

But it's all progress if it's actually useful. Useful enough to warrent the cost in your favorite dollar. Automatic transmissions in cars? Buyers made the choice and paied for them. Not a fad ... good device. Roll up w the crank windows? Again people paid for electric windows and that established the value of them. You could say those things were better for the general population and proved they wer'nt a fad. But when you were the only one on the block with (whatever) it was a fad. For me I prefer stick shift cars but not hand crank windows .. the safety feature of the latter put aside. But they were fads when first introduced. And the people that had them were mostly trendy vouge types that gravitated to the latest do-dad whether it was tail fin cars or cruiser bad ass motorcycles. The latter a long lived fad.

One thing I will admit to is that the fad now is the proving ground for the good modern device or other that evolves down the road. A necessary stage of evolution.

Play toy drones have already evolved into the latest tools for real estate presentations, law enforcement and news reporting. Many other uses have already or will come to pass. I personally think they should be limited to government and commercial use. Not a toy. Too much danger to aviation. If I had an ultralight now I'd sell it because of the drones.

But as we get older most of us can see the value of a fad like thing or see that the value is not worth the money (human effort) and avoid the waste (human effort). Young people are far far more impulsive and tend to waste their time and money on fads that will never be anything else. A truly vogue person will be dripping w fads. In their house, part of their clothes, on their boats and cars and many other places.

Are other people just slow or more intellegent and objective? Or are the vouge people smart enough to see the value instantly and "go for it" ending this post (haha) w a fad of speech. Language is very suceptable to fads. Heard young people lately .. Like real lately.

Art good post.
Peter the back up cameras in cars are in the fad stage. My Honda has one and I use it. But I use my rearview mirrors much more. Some of that is habbit though. Aft visability in newer cars is terrible and that partly brought about the camras. My little 87 Nissan has great aft visability. In the 50's w the lower seat backs and no head restraints you used to get your arm around the girl by backing up as throwing your arm over the seat was standard practice. And the back end of cars were low. If back up cameras are just a fad in 10 years they will be gone.
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