Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-15-2015, 11:16 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
oscar's Avatar
 
City: Bethlehem, PA
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Lady Kay V
Vessel Model: Don't know yet.....
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 420
I may need a support group......

Is there such a thing as "Boat dockers anonymous?"

Now I feel like a hypocrite for yelling at my kid when he games too much....

Welcome to The Boat Docker | The Boat Docker
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Currently boatless but looking. Avatar is my first boat....Holland, 1965 ish.....
oscar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2015, 11:44 AM   #2
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
While simulators like this can be somewhat useful, unless they are really sophisticated they lack the key ingredient of every docking and maneuver and that is inertia. Until one actually has a boat in their hands to practice with one will never learn the true aspects of docking because understanding how a specific boat responds to inertia and then seeing, feeling, and reacting to that response is what 99 percent of maneuvering is all about.

Whether the force is thrust, rudder, wind, current, or a combination of these the boat's actions are based on its response to inertia. Either to start it moving, change its direction of movement, or stopping its movement.
__________________

Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2015, 12:03 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
oscar's Avatar
 
City: Bethlehem, PA
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Lady Kay V
Vessel Model: Don't know yet.....
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 420
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
While simulators like this can be somewhat useful, unless they are really sophisticated they lack the key ingredient of every docking and maneuver and that is inertia. Until one actually has a boat in their hands to practice with one will never learn the true aspects of docking because understanding how a specific boat responds to inertia and then seeing, feeling, and reacting to that response is what 99 percent of maneuvering is all about.

Whether the force is thrust, rudder, wind, current, or a combination of these the boat's actions are based on its response to inertia. Either to start it moving, change its direction of movement, or stopping its movement.
Absolutely correct. That said, this simulator DOES have inertia, as well as wind and current. How accurate it is depends on which boat you drive in real life. Still, it's a pretty well designed program.
__________________
Currently boatless but looking. Avatar is my first boat....Holland, 1965 ish.....
oscar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2015, 12:21 PM   #4
Guru
 
No Mast's Avatar
 
City: Atlantic Highlands, NJ
Country: US
Vessel Name: Moana Huaka'i
Vessel Model: Selene 53
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 816
Well, it's better than actually working while I'm at my computer
No Mast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2015, 02:28 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
clynn's Avatar
 
City: Memphis
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Ivory Lady
Vessel Model: 46 Jefferson
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
...they lack the key ingredient of every docking and maneuver and that is inertia.
I would suggest that they also lack feelings of terror, your wife yelling at you, and everybody on the dock watching
clynn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2015, 02:36 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
City: louisiana
Country: usa
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 207
I would add 'the sound of wood and fiberglass splintering and the whoosh of paper currency exiting an open wallet'
rardoin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2015, 09:49 PM   #7
Guru
 
healhustler's Avatar
 
City: Longboat Key, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bucky
Vessel Model: Krogen Manatee 36 North Sea
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 4,178
I'd have to say that boat handling is a pretty sensual experience, that is, knowing how your boat responds, how it sounds when the prop bites into a current, the way it telegraphs a change in the wind, maybe what it means when you recognize a chine slap on the starboard bow or on the port buttock. It's amazing how useful those developed senses are in handling anything that requires knowing your place in space, no matter the vehicle you might be in. Data is great to have but you'll never be a great boat handler unless you're working with every sense you've got.
__________________
Larry

"I'd rather be happy than dignified".
healhustler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2015, 06:36 PM   #8
Guru
 
kthoennes's Avatar
 
City: Sioux Falls, South Dakota
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Xanadu
Vessel Model: Mainship 37 Motor Yacht
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 857
Quote:
Originally Posted by clynn View Post
I would suggest that they also lack feelings of terror, your wife yelling at you, and everybody on the dock watching
I see it's also missing all those people on the dock yelling (conflicting) directions at you, the other boat owners running to their boats to fend you off which heightens the embarrassment of a bad landing, two kids on a paddleboard slowly crossing 10 feet in front of your bow as you're coming in, and the dog threating to jump from the swim step to the dock long before it's safe for her to do so and while the props are still roaring. Needs some enhancements. But it's a start.

I suppose I'd also add some additional game levels. Level 2: a marina you've never seen before where they tell you "Just go to Slip Z27 and we'll see you there." but there is no Z27, and nobody is on the dock and it's getting dark. Level 3: the landing goes really well and you're close, but you discover your mooring lines are too short and you have to start all over again. Level 4: your crew (aka wife) can't throw, or the dock guy can't catch, and you have to start all over again. Level 5: the higher you set the windspeed on the simulator, the more likely it will be that one engine craps out at a critical moment. Level 6: You forgot to align the wheel to center before you entered the marina, so you have no clear idea where the rudders might be now -- all you know is that it's tracking funny using only throttles and shifters and things are too tense and close-in and the wind is too high to spend 10 seconds on lock-to-lock wheel turning and counting the revolutions.

(P.S. my wife has learned to throw a line better than a major league pitcher lately, happily I'm just speaking theoretically on that one now.)
kthoennes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2015, 07:51 PM   #9
Veteran Member
 
ufish2's Avatar
 
City: Farmington, NM
Country: USA
Vessel Name: UTUG2
Vessel Model: Outer Reef 26
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 44
Could include yelling at wife because she forgot to throw fenders over or the fenders are on the wrong side of the boat. Yelling at wife who is afraid of falling in the water when she jumps off to tie off boat 10ft away from dock. Yelling at son while he is telling you he just set the all time record on his video game as your trying to concentrate on not ramming the dock. Yelling at dog because he is giving you this look that I'm fixing to drop something on your floor if you don't hurry up and get me to the dock. Yelling at wife again when she drops pole in the water to prevent boat from hitting dock. Oh no! There are numerous nails sticking our on the dock and your don't see them until its too late and scratch the heck out of your hull. Finally harbormaster informs you the dock space your headed to is not for transient mooring and they are full. Of course none of these events have happened on our peaceful boat.
ufish2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2015, 07:52 PM   #10
Guru
 
City: Sydney
Country: Australia
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 1,349
With a single engine I'm open to any help
gaston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2015, 08:11 PM   #11
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,262
Generally, the most adrenaline-raising experience on a boat for a helmsman is docking the boat. It's mostly a matter of taking it slow and repeating the experience. Can't see how a simulater would help much. Every boat is unique in its handling. ... Place fenders on both sides.

__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 10:49 AM   #12
Dauntless Award
 
Wxx3's Avatar
 
City: New York, NY
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Dauntless
Vessel Model: Kadey Krogen 42 - 148
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2,312
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufish2 View Post
Could include yelling at wife because she forgot to throw fenders over or the fenders are on the wrong side of the boat. Yelling at wife who is afraid of falling in the water when she jumps off to tie off boat 10ft away from dock. Yelling at son while he is telling you he just set the all time record on his video game as your trying to concentrate on not ramming the dock. Yelling at dog because he is giving you this look that I'm fixing to drop something on your floor if you don't hurry up and get me to the dock. Yelling at wife again when she drops pole in the water to prevent boat from hitting dock. Oh no! There are numerous nails sticking our on the dock and your don't see them until its too late and scratch the heck out of your hull. Finally harbormaster informs you the dock space your headed to is not for transient mooring and they are full. Of course none of these events have happened on our peaceful boat.
These are all great. I must make it a must read for my guests/crew.

Twice in Helsinki, when finally docked after 20
Harrowing minutes, I was panting like I had just run up a mountain.

I don't think I've ever had that much adrenaline in my system.
__________________
M/Y Dauntless, New York
a Kadey Krogen 42 Currently https://share.delorme.com/dauntless
Blog: https://dauntlessatsea.com
Find us: https://share.delorme.com/dauntless
Wxx3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 10:58 AM   #13
Curmudgeon
 
BaltimoreLurker's Avatar
 
City: Stoney Creek, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moon Dance
Vessel Model: 1974 34' Marine Trader Sedan
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,629
Quote:
Originally Posted by gaston View Post
With a single engine I'm open to any help

Stop in the turning basin. Put out the fenders. Attach lines (if you're not at your home dock where they may already be fixed), put the boat hook(s) where you'll need them, walk your crew through the procedure. Then proceed.

And it may still go horribly wrong!
BaltimoreLurker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 05:58 PM   #14
Veteran Member
 
ufish2's Avatar
 
City: Farmington, NM
Country: USA
Vessel Name: UTUG2
Vessel Model: Outer Reef 26
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 44
I use fenders on both sides. There are times however that I am fishing from the bow of the boat. To ensure I have a straight shot to the stern to gaff or net a fish I pull the fenders so I don't have to worry about tripping over or having a line tangled. Occasionally the wife forgets to retie the fenders. Ha! When your boat skills are as good as mine, fenders are your best friend.
ufish2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 07:23 PM   #15
Guru
 
janice142's Avatar
 
City: St. Pete, FL
Country: USofA
Vessel Name: Seaweed
Vessel Model: Schucker mini-trawler
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 914
Send a message via AIM to janice142 Send a message via MSN to janice142 Send a message via Yahoo to janice142 Send a message via Skype™ to janice142
Quote:
Originally Posted by gaston View Post
With a single engine I'm open to any help
For me, I simply pull Seaweed in straight ahead. I do not attempt to do any backing into slips. Frankly, I'm not good at that. So after I pull in and secure the boat with a couple of lines I shut down the engine and do my standard engine room check.

Next I then take a 60' length of braided nylon and tie to to her stern quarter. I tie that line to the aft cleat on the side that will be tied to the pier.

Then I take off the two lines that had been holding my girl. I give her a shove out and then reel her in like a fish with the braided stern line. It takes all of five minutes when the winds are calm.

If I have help it takes ten minutes.

But then I'm ready to go at a moment's notice.

Light weight boats are wonderful. Those of you with heavy yachts cannot do this with any kind of wind or current. I prefer to the spin at slack tide however I do get it done before I tuck in for the night.

I am ALWAYS ready to leave. All dock lines end (are tied) to the cleats on my boat. When I want to go it's simply a matter of taking of the lines and pulling them back aboard. The one that is holding her (usually my mid-cleat) is last to come in.

Anyway, that's how I do it with my Seaweed.
You'll be able to watch the performance this weekend (engine turns over and final heat exchanger/hose install is (knock teak) tomorrow.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ufish2 View Post
When your boat skills are as good as mine, fenders are your best friend.
Amen. Of course girls can get away with getting on the VHF and saying "I'm not very good at docking" and help always appears.
__________________

__________________
Janice aboard Seaweed, living the good life afloat...
http://janice142.com
janice142 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:18 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012