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Old 03-21-2016, 08:35 PM   #41
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I rode out Rita, north of Sabine Pass, right after Katrina destroyed NOLA. I said I'd never do it again but have rode out a few lesser storms since. My advice, do everything possible for the boat, then run fast and far, preferably ahead of the crowd. If Rita had come in where they predicted the death toll would have been astounding from stranded motorists stuck on congested highways.
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Old 03-21-2016, 08:51 PM   #42
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I rode out Rita, north of Sabine Pass, right after Katrina destroyed NOLA. I said I'd never do it again but have rode out a few lesser storms since. My advice, do everything possible for the boat, then run fast and far, preferably ahead of the crowd. If Rita had come in where they predicted the death toll would have been astounding from stranded motorists stuck on congested highways.
The Gulf is very different than the East Coast due to the low lying areas covering so much territory.

As to evacuation, people sometimes get confused, but evacuation is based on surge, not the winds. In Fort Lauderdale, East of the ICW is an evacuation area for almost any hurricane. We're on the West side of the ICW, which is an evacuation area only for major hurricanes, typically CAT 3 or higher. Once you go about 10 blocks from the water, then it's not an evacuation zone for any hurricane. Our office is not in an evacuation zone even though it's very close to the New River. We talk about hurricane plans for our boats, we have them for our home and businesses and ourselves, all subject to change based on the real situation.

As you indicate, the place one doesn't want to be when it strikes is on the road.
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Old 03-21-2016, 09:58 PM   #43
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That can't be how snubbers are normally set up, are they?

From what I recall about setting up anchor systems in my climbing days, the forces on the ropes as they made the turn through the hawse holes could have been far greater than a straight line pull. If I'm right, its no wonder the snubber failed.
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Old 03-21-2016, 10:11 PM   #44
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You can see what I mean in the chart below...where the forces on the rope shown on the video could have been 500% greater at the turn through the hawse than a straight line pull;
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Old 03-21-2016, 10:28 PM   #45
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You can see what I mean in the chart below...where the forces on the rope shown on the video could have been 500% greater at the turn through the hawse than a straight line pull;
A rope going through a hawse like the snubber in the video would have a higher load, but not 500%. The highest it could be would be 200% of the load, but that would be with a 180 degree turn. The snubber in the video is probably turning less that 90 degrees, so probably roughly about 120-130% of the load.

I think the bigger problem than load is chafe. Since the distance from the cleat to the hawse is substantial, the row will saw back and forth on the hawse as it stretches. This is a recipe for chafe as they show on the video.
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Old 03-22-2016, 01:01 PM   #46
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I should have put the calcultions I was proposing as MurrayM did. I think these are the correct ones to use for this situation since the hawse is basically a turning block.

Turning block loads
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Old 03-22-2016, 03:19 PM   #47
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I should have put the calcultions I was proposing as MurrayM did. I think these are the correct ones to use for this situation since the hawse is basically a turning block.

Turning block loads
Thanks a bunch for that link. The only difference being, as you said earlier, that chafing was happening as opposed to running smoothy over a pulley.

It's no wonder snubbers fail as often as they do then, if the loads (as in this case) are more than expected...plus nylon gets weaker when it gets wet, or through heat generated by repetitive loading cycles, or going over a sharp turn where the outer fibers are doing "more work" than the fibers on the inside of the radius.
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Old 03-22-2016, 04:36 PM   #48
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Being in Florida on the South East Coast, if I could I would run to Stuart and wait and see. Of course you can only do this if you are able to take the boat and run from a storm. In Stuart you can go North, South or West across the lake. Options are good. Being where the storm isn't is very good.
Having been through a storm or two just 25 miles from the center can make a giant difference in conditions. Being 100 miles away and it's just a very windy day. I would not want a storm to chase me up coast but running West is a real option. Also note that bridges stop operating at a certain point pre storm, so you have to stay well ahead or risk getting stuck between bridges in unfamiliar territory.
Here in South Florida those that remember Andrew (1992) know that while rising water is a major concern, enough wind can create some real devastation. While water rose high enough to float large boats onto US1, winds flattened entire subdivisions 10 miles inland.
I would never choose to haul my boat for a storm, seen what can happen, don't want to be there.
As others have mentioned, sometimes its the other boats that are the problem. At one time when I kept my boat in a canal off the ICW the neighbors worked together and we made sure everyone had battened down and tied up for storm conditions, and pitched in to secure boats with owners MIA. In the Keys we would run up into the mangrove canals, there are plenty of them, and tie off all over into the roots. I sat out a storm like that once and there was a lot going on above but just a stiff breeze in the canal. Good thing about this is that you are usually in there with just one or two other boats, not much worry about googans dragging down on you.

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Old 03-22-2016, 05:12 PM   #49
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Thanks a bunch for that link. The only difference being, as you said earlier, that chafing was happening as opposed to running smoothy over a pulley.

It's no wonder snubbers fail as often as they do then, if the loads (as in this case) are more than expected...plus nylon gets weaker when it gets wet, or through heat generated by repetitive loading cycles, or going over a sharp turn where the outer fibers are doing "more work" than the fibers on the inside of the radius.
We get around that by using dyneema from the cleat to just outside the hawse, then nylon from there to the anchor chain. This means almost no chafe, plus no noise.
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Old 03-22-2016, 05:52 PM   #50
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"right after Katrina destroyed NOLA"

Mr. K, with all due respect Katrina destroyed the Mississippi coast, inland for miles, while NOLA got lots of rain, and a levee broke, flooding the place. No fun for either place, but MS took the brunt of the winds and tidal surge - over 20ft to be exact.
Also all beware of salvaged boats from these storms - some good deals can be had, but go in with eyes wide open.
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Old 03-22-2016, 05:54 PM   #51
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We get around that by using dyneema from the cleat to just outside the hawse, then nylon from there to the anchor chain. This means almost no chafe, plus no noise.
Makes total sense
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Old 03-22-2016, 08:08 PM   #52
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You are correct, it was much more destructive west of NOLA, its just that we remember all the crying and whining from NewOrleans afterwards. Didnt really here much from the coastal communities, like Cameron, Biloxy, etc. They just set to work rebuilding.
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