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Old 03-19-2016, 10:30 PM   #21
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Possum has been through a few hurricanes including one cat 5. Luckily all the time I've owned her she has been docked well up a canal with high banks. I strip off all the canvas, put extra lines on and call it good. I have since gotten a long line I plan to run across the canal to hold her off the dock.

The biggest danger to Possum during a hurricane is that a big oak tree might fall on her.

As JW pointed out, don't leave sails on roller furlers. One tiny piece will get loose and take out the whole rig.
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Old 03-20-2016, 12:42 AM   #22
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Hurricane Sandy did a job on our sailboat. Per insurance requirement we were out of the water. Over 66% of the boats on land at the marina were no longer there when the storm was over. Ours hung on the bulkhead and we found it just as the picture shows. We cut off the rigging, had a crane put her on a flatbed and trucked it to Annapolis. She was repaired and sold shortly thereafter.

Since then we've been running North up the Hudson instead when a storm kicks up.


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Old 03-20-2016, 12:52 AM   #23
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Hurricane Sandy did a job on our sailboat. Per insurance requirement we were out of the water. Over 66% of the boats on land at the marina were no longer there when the storm was over. Ours hung on the bulkhead and we found it just as the picture shows. We cut off the rigging, had a crane put her on a flatbed and trucked it to Annapolis. She was repaired and sold shortly thereafter.

Since then we've been running North up the Hudson instead when a storm kicks up.
Sorry you experienced that. It is excellent information you shared.
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Old 03-20-2016, 06:07 AM   #24
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Hurricane Sandy did a job on our sailboat. Per insurance requirement we were out of the water. Over 66% of the boats on land at the marina were no longer there when the storm was over. Ours hung on the bulkhead and we found it just as the picture shows. We cut off the rigging, had a crane put her on a flatbed and trucked it to Annapolis. She was repaired and sold shortly thereafter.

Since then we've been running North up the Hudson instead when a storm kicks up.


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Just curious, we the boats blown off their stands, or lifted off by high water?
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Old 03-20-2016, 07:17 AM   #25
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My 35' charter boat has rode out a couple of hurricanes in the water including Irene. The Marina in Ocean City hauls most of the boats as required by many of the charter boats' insurance companies. Have a great relationship with the marina. They allow me to pick any of the empty slips to move to. So I set the boat up in a 70' slip with long double lines. Theses slips have much taller larger pilings. The result is that the lines are much longer to absorb shock loading, the boat is far away from any of the pilings, and with the length of the lines the boat could handle a 10' storm surge. The marina is in a basin which limits waves to a couple of feet.

The boat winters on land inside Chesapeake Bay. When Sandy came, I had taken the boat to winter storage 2 weeks before. She was high and dry keel blocked with three sets of jack stands. There is a risk of her floating off the jack stands but that would take a 8' tidal surge. Worst hurricane that yard endured was Hazel (1954). The storm came up West of Chesapeake Bay with 100 MPH winds which drove the bay water in to the marina on the Eastern shore of the bay. The storm surge was 5'. The yard was covered with 1' of water.

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Old 03-20-2016, 07:26 AM   #26
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Hurricane Hugo, Isle of Palms, SC 1989. Young engr in shipyard, renting a house on the beach. Hurricane destroyed the house, floated off my 66 Fairlane coupe, dropped an 18" pine tree on my skiff, soggied everything I owned except what was in an s10 blazer.
Wasn't an old red beach house on Isle of Palms, was it, Ski? Hugo destroyed 3 of the beach houses we used to rent on IOP and floated off a cousin's fishing boat. Family evacuated to Mt. Pleasant to ride it out and when the eye passed over they could hear breakers--normally about 3 miles away. My wife's brother-in-law was one of the first back on Sullivan's Island with the sheriff; he said the first vehicle he saw rolling was a beer truck.
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Old 03-20-2016, 08:53 AM   #27
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Hurricanes George (1998), Irene (1999), etc. happened on us when we were living near FLL and working in Miami... but we were sort of in between boats then (original boat still in MD during George, still shopping during Irene, etc.) so didn't really have to do much boat prep. Learned all about hurricane shutters, though...


Hurricane Isabel, 2003: Our home dock was very wide -- we essentially docked our previous boat "sideways" across three slips meant for ~24' boats -- so we tied the boat in the center with ~12 or so very long lines, walked away, hoped for the best. That kept the boat from getting beat up on piles, and worked well for the ~8' storm surge. Several of the neighbor boats in slips but on lifts... floated off... didn't land nicely...

Hurricane Irene, 2011: Current boat, different home marina... we moved from our own marina to one with new floating docks. Tied up with about 16 lines, walked away (had to evacuate that area), hoped for the best, worked out OK.

TS Sandy, 2012: Current boat, prep during the period when Sandy was still a Hurricane and still aimed at us... we moved to a more sheltered marina with new floating docks. Ditto ~16 lines, ended up staying on board (no evacuation order there, Sandy downgraded to TS, and the track changed to further away from here), worked out OK.

For Isabel and Irene, we stripped the boat -- canvas down, etc. -- but for Sandy we didn't have to do all that.

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Old 03-20-2016, 08:58 AM   #28
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Just curious, we the boats blown off their stands, or lifted off by high water?

Lifted off by high water.
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Old 03-20-2016, 10:45 AM   #29
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Wasn't an old red beach house on Isle of Palms, was it, Ski? Hugo destroyed 3 of the beach houses we used to rent on IOP and floated off a cousin's fishing boat. Family evacuated to Mt. Pleasant to ride it out and when the eye passed over they could hear breakers--normally about 3 miles away. My wife's brother-in-law was one of the first back on Sullivan's Island with the sheriff; he said the first vehicle he saw rolling was a beer truck.
No, the house was a few blocks inland. House had some trees on the roof, and had six feet of saltwater inside. Only later did it become apparent that the house floated off the foundation then came to rest in not quite the same location.

The swing bridge to the islands, IOP and Sullivans, was blown off it's pedestal and was not repaired for a number of months, so no mainland traffic on the islands. But I did find my 66 Fairlane a few blocks away in a ditch and actually got it running. So I had one of the few operating cars on the island. Ferried things between there and the mainland with a 18' Privateer with some crunch damage from that 18" pine tree that landed on it. Tough boats, those Privateers.

Had to get creative to manage our presence around the cops and nat guard, they did not want us on the island. "Too dangerous" they said. With a little finagling, we got them to leave us alone.
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Old 03-20-2016, 11:04 AM   #30
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Our dock pilings (every other one) are 12' above normal water so nothing is going over them. The worst rise I have seen was the 100 year flood and it was 9'. I run bow lines, stern lines and mid ship to trees on shore on other side of creek. Dock side lines allow me to pull her about 4' off of dock and I gang plank back to dock. We take all canvas off and have bow pointed to NE (open end of creek) and I frequently set an anchor way out. We shut dock power off and move dock box to high ground. I put the dinghy in yard near house and tied off to deck for escape route if needed. This has worked well since I moved here in the late 80's. When the high water gets here we watch her do what boats do...float.

In Irene we did have two big trees come through the roof to the tune of $40K but the boat did fine.

As I get older I get more nervous and am seriously considering having her on the hard. We are only 200 yards from the boat yard and will most likely do that if it looks like it will be a bad one
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Old 03-20-2016, 12:42 PM   #31
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Hurricanes George (1998), Irene (1999), etc. happened on us when we were living near FLL and working in Miami... but we were sort of in between boats then (original boat still in MD during George, still shopping during Irene, etc.) so didn't really have to do much boat prep. Learned all about hurricane shutters, though...


Hurricane Isabel, 2003: Our home dock was very wide -- we essentially docked our previous boat "sideways" across three slips meant for ~24' boats -- so we tied the boat in the center with ~12 or so very long lines, walked away, hoped for the best. That kept the boat from getting beat up on piles, and worked well for the ~8' storm surge. Several of the neighbor boats in slips but on lifts... floated off... didn't land nicely...

Hurricane Irene, 2011: Current boat, different home marina... we moved from our own marina to one with new floating docks. Tied up with about 16 lines, walked away (had to evacuate that area), hoped for the best, worked out OK.

TS Sandy, 2012: Current boat, prep during the period when Sandy was still a Hurricane and still aimed at us... we moved to a more sheltered marina with new floating docks. Ditto ~16 lines, ended up staying on board (no evacuation order there, Sandy downgraded to TS, and the track changed to further away from here), worked out OK.

For Isabel and Irene, we stripped the boat -- canvas down, etc. -- but for Sandy we didn't have to do all that.

-Chris
Your experiences are typical of those I've heard from others in Fort Lauderdale. Maybe we'll suddenly have the 500 year storm as opposed to the 100 year storm, but barring that a lot of the fears of both boat owners and home owners are based on conditions that don't seem to happen here. There are two aspects of hurricanes to prepare for.

The first is surge and the docks being constructed today are for the most part built to handle surge greater than Fort Lauderdale has seen. They are well secured floating docks with pilings taller than the greatest surges to hit here. Our home appears to be dangerously close to the water, but per the current flood maps and the 100 year histories, there hasn't been a surge that would reach it.

The second part is wind. There it seems to come down to how well the dock and boat in the water or the blocks and boat on land are secured. I would say that the best hurricane prepared shipyards have superior tie downs and blocks, but the majority of yards just lifting a boat out of the water and blocking it, do not. Location is also important as it seems the winds are typically stronger at the higher elevations of land. As to houses, most of those built on the coast here in recent years have been built to stand up to greater winds. They have windows designed for it or storm shutters. They have roofs designed for greater wind. Ultimately the greatest fear on the water and land is often flying objects.

It's great to read about actual experiences. Please keep the stories coming. We've asked these questions of others locally. It's interesting to hear what others have encountered in various parts of the country and what the results have been.
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Old 03-20-2016, 02:00 PM   #32
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Just when you think you got hurricanes figured out...

The Holiday Inn (IIRC) on Dauphin Island near Mobile was built to be "hurricane proof"....it was till the architects failed to remember the swimming pool right in front...it floated out of the ground and acted like a battering ran until it collapsed that wing of the building.
In hurricane Frederick.

There is only one true way to avoid damage. Get as far away from wind and surge if you can. Even in areas not expecting a surge...stand by for other weird stuff.

One thing learned the hard way in NJ noreasters. Many thought their lagoons were protected by marsh from wave action...until water rises 2 feet above the marsh and now your has 2 foot chop in it till the tide recedes. Have salvaged many a boat because of the "unexpected".
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Old 03-20-2016, 02:48 PM   #33
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Just when you think you got hurricanes figured out...

The Holiday Inn (IIRC) on Dauphin Island near Mobile was built to be "hurricane proof"....it was till the architects failed to remember the swimming pool right in front...it floated out of the ground and acted like a battering ran until it collapsed that wing of the building.
In hurricane Frederick.

There is only one true way to avoid damage. Get as far away from wind and surge if you can. Even in areas not expecting a surge...stand by for other weird stuff.

One thing learned the hard way in NJ noreasters. Many thought their lagoons were protected by marsh from wave action...until water rises 2 feet above the marsh and now your has 2 foot chop in it till the tide recedes. Have salvaged many a boat because of the "unexpected".
Move 500 miles inland and you'll likely avoid a hurricane. Might be trading for a few tornadoes, though. Fewer hurricanes on the West Coast, just more earthquakes.

I see where several NC people have mentioned Hazel. Long before I was born but you still hear stories. It caused damage well inland. It even led to 81 deaths in Toronto.

Growing up in Charlotte, NC, the only hurricane I remember really being a part of was Hugo in 1989. I was 19, had recently graduated from college, was working my first job outside the family and living in my first apartment by myself. I was a sound sleeper and really didn't realize what had happened until I woke to get ready for work. Power out, trees everywhere. I then got dressed and after the winds calmed a bit, I went out to my car to turn the radio on and find out what was going on. I watched the clock, worrying about being late for work. (Yes, I know...hurricane and all sounds stupid but I was young). Around 8 am things had calmed further and I drove to the office. No one was there, but I stayed, since unlike my apartment, there was power there. I tried to answer the phones but quickly found far more calls than I could handle and let them ring. Called my mother to find out she had power and all was fine. I turned the tv on in the conference room and found we had one station on the air. Watched it and ate snacks. Only food I had was all the stuff in the snack machines at the office. Mid afternoon I drove to the marina to check on my boat. It was in dry storage and fine. Then I got on the interstate and drove looking for an area with electricity and open restaurants. Ate dinner, checked into a motel and waited until morning to go see what was going on at my apartment. I had power when I got home but some areas took up to two weeks. I threw away the food in the refrigerator and grilled everything in the freezer which was all still very cold. Cooked enough for days, even having to freeze some of the cooked food.

Hugo only took 6 hours from landfall to travel the 150 miles inland to Charlotte. I was completely unprepared for it. We'd never had a hurricane. They happened on the coast. I wasn't scared by it as I didn't expect it and slept through the worst, just totally confused by it.
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Old 03-20-2016, 03:28 PM   #34
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Your experiences are typical of those I've heard from others in Fort Lauderdale.

Rereading my own note... I see it's probably not obvious that we were back up here on the Chesapeake for our 2003, 2011, and 2012 events.

I was in Miami on a house-hunting trip during Georges, essentially locked down in the hotel room... and it turned out to be a decent learning experience since we'd been a bit apprehensive about the job transfer and hurricane potential.

Aside from the 1999 version of Irene -- track prediction kept varying from one coats to the other, and then it finally came right over our house -- it turned out we didn't have much to worry about while living down there. It was a bit disconcerting watching rain water rise toward the house in front (couldn't drain off the streets fast enough) and in back (the alligator pond, don't ya know) at the same time. In the grand scheme of things, I think our "high ground" at the foundation was still maybe only a foot or so above actual street- (and lake-) level around us. And manually mounting the 35 or so sets of retro-fitted hurricane shutters was a bit of a pain.

I do dislike dealing with Hurricanes up here on the Chesapeake, though! Interferes with our cruising schedule!



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Old 03-21-2016, 12:54 PM   #35
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Been through several hurricanes and strong tropical storms. As a New England coastal cruiser, I've never had to ride out a major named storm at anchor, nor would I. We've been hit at anchor a couple of times in strong T-storms and gales.

One memorable event was a thunder storm, Great Salt Pond, Block Island, Summer 1970. Coast Guard station recorded wind gusts to 90 knots. Wife and I and dog anchored off Paynes Dock in 17' Venture swing keel sailboat. Anchor dragged and we ended up on rocks just below the Sullivan House. What a ride and experience, but we were young.

Prior to 1982, all my boats were trailerable, and I hauled them for any storms. Since then...

- Hurricane Gloria, September 1985. Storm tracked SouthEast of us. O'Day 28 "Puffin" rode it out on mooring. Removed all sails and doubled up on mooring pendants.

- Tropical Storm Henri, September 1985, direct hit on Watch Hill, O'Day 28 "Puffin" hauled prior to landfall. Re-launched day after storm.

- Bob, August 1991. Island Packet 31 "Puffin", broke from its mooring in Col. Willie Cove (Watch Hill), blew out to Pawcatuck Point, and came rushing back, missing Horace Island and barely missing the boatyard house bulkhead, landing smack dab on the old marine railroad tracks (pictured below). Boat pulled back into water with yard crane, and NO DAMAGE done. Three other sailboats broke loose and up on the rocks in the Cove. Several sailboats in the mooring field of the Watch Hill Yacht Club ending up above the bulkhead and on the grass in downtown Watch Hill. Lesson learned... haul or move.

- Perfect Storm, October 1991. Boat hauled just prior to Storm.

- NoName low-pressure system, October 2006. Gust over 60 knots for 2 days. New boat NT32 "Puffin", hanging on our 500# Dor Mor, with double 1" poly pendants. 40' Hunter Legend in front of us broke loose (thin, weak pendants, no chafe gear), and came down on Puffin, damage to port side, and Hunter anchor impaled in Puffin's transom. Boatyard crew came out to rig Hunter off my stern cleats to ride out the rest of storm (picture below). Speaks to strong mooring and strong Nordic Tug.

- Hurricane Earl, September 2010. Moved NT32 "Puffin" up the Thames River to Norwich CT, riding out Earl in marina slip with no issues. Local New London TV news had shots up "Puffin" rounding Avery Point, with the narrative..."boat owners making preparations for Earl". A couple of tall ships in the area where anchored just North of the Sub Base. Next day, returned to Watch Hill rolling down Westerly waves in 35 knots of wind (stupid move on my part). We past a bunch of crazies from Stonington Yacht Club sailing a race off Fishers Island. One boat ran aground on North Dumpling with a crew member getting killed by boom.

- Hurricane Irene, August 2011. Hauled "Puffin" day before storm hit. Re-launched the next day. Power out in the area for 7 days, so we took off cruising around North and South Fork of Long Island. Great weather after the storm. Got back home a week later with refrigerator and freezer full of compost.

- Super Storm Sandy, October 2012. We hauled the boat the day before storm hit. The storm surge came within a couple of inches of floating boats off their jack stands. At peak tide, there was 3 feet of water in the boatyard parking lot.

Only advice I can make is to track the storms closely to determine if you're on the weak or strong side, haul or move if necessary, and carry adequate insurance. At some point, like Sandy or the Great Hurricane of 1938, there's not much you can do to avoid loosing the boat.
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Old 03-21-2016, 02:31 PM   #36
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Rode Irene and Sandy on the hook.

Irene was in VA off Deltaville. Set out 175' of chain and no problems.

Sandy was in North Port, NY in the highest clocked windows of the storm. Brought her near the east shore of the bay and put out 175' again. No problems. Made a nice hearty duel snubber and all was well.
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Old 03-21-2016, 03:02 PM   #37
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Old 03-21-2016, 03:58 PM   #38
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Nsail...nice video...

Looks like you had more wind than I did down deep in a hurricane hole that the eye pretty much passed over top of.

I would say my highest gust barely made 50 and really no sustained winds as it was always swirling..I would have guessed 40 sustained
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Old 03-21-2016, 06:35 PM   #39
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Here on the central gulf coast(South Louisiana), most everyone that wants to protect their boat, runs it up a river or canal or trailers it North. I take mine up the Vermilion river 25 miles to Abbeville, La and tie it with extra large lines to trees along the bank with the anchor set out in the middle of the river. The storm surge it what will kill most boats and folks. Of course I take everything at the camp and move t upstairs 15 foot above sea level. Have not had water yet in all these years in the camp, But have come close several times. Been thru some many storms(Camp built in 1954)I can't remember one from another. I don't put anymore wind gauges up, they just can't make it thru the storms. Lost a few sheets of tin off the camp once and had 4 derelict sailboats tangled up under the camp one time and lots of glass broken out from flying debris. I think I catch most of the debris from the marina and other camps South of me under my camp. Always a mess.
Best to respect Mother Nature. I would never put my boat on the hard unless I could trailer it out of harms way. Seen to many destroyed that way. Plan, plan, and plan. We're fortunate that we get a heads up about the track of these storms so arrangements can be made. God bless NOAA.
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Old 03-21-2016, 07:46 PM   #40
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My little 23.5 Hunter sailboat survived hurricane Ike on her trailer in a marina storage area. We stripped all canvas and dropped the mast. We strapped her to the trailer so she couldn't float off it. We then anchored the trailer to the ground. Ike pushed 13' of storm surge and we had an entire marina in Baytown float above the pilings and boats, docks and all settled in a nearby park parking lot. My boat apparently floated 5' above ground and then came back down on her trailer wheels with only a few scratches from other boats floating past and across the road. I say apparently 5' by looking at the water marks on the buildings nearby.

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