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Old 07-31-2017, 02:59 PM   #1
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How wide a lock?

I have a Lagoon 43 PowerCat with a beam of 21 feet. I'd like to travel from Lake Champlain to the St. Lawrence through the Chambly Canal. The width of some of the 9 locks in the canal is as narrow as 22 feet. Any suggestions as to how or if I should attempt passage through these locks? Thanks!
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Old 07-31-2017, 03:10 PM   #2
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I have a Lagoon 43 PowerCat with a beam of 21 feet. I'd like to travel from Lake Champlain to the St. Lawrence through the Chambly Canal. The width of some of the 9 locks in the canal is as narrow as 22 feet. Any suggestions as to how or if I should attempt passage through these locks? Thanks!
Call the Canal Authorities they will be able to tell you for sure.


It would be a great trip. Best of luck.


Cheers


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Old 07-31-2017, 04:36 PM   #3
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Air draft isn't a problem for you in the Champlain Canal?
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Old 07-31-2017, 04:40 PM   #4
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Call the Canal Authorities they will be able to tell you for sure.
Definitely call them as I've now seen the width of the smallest lock shown at 21', 22' and 23'. Even at 22', I can't see how you'd be able to get in and out with fenders on both sides without the risk of damage.
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Old 07-31-2017, 05:17 PM   #5
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Definitely call them as I've now seen the width of the smallest lock shown at 21', 22' and 23'. Even at 22', I can't see how you'd be able to get in and out with fenders on both sides without the risk of damage.
Fenderboards. There's a show on cable TV, "Distant Shores" where a couple cruises Europe and the Atlantic in a sailboat. The episode I watched earlier today had them transiting several locks just a few inches wider than their boat. They mad full length fenderboards and tapered the forward edge and the tops so they wouldn't get hung up on the lock walls.
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Old 07-31-2017, 05:45 PM   #6
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Fenderboards. There's a show on cable TV, "Distant Shores" where a couple cruises Europe and the Atlantic in a sailboat. The episode I watched earlier today had them transiting several locks just a few inches wider than their boat. They mad full length fenderboards and tapered the forward edge and the tops so they wouldn't get hung up on the lock walls.
We have used fenderboards and some large long fenders which are essentially the same technique as fender boards. Still, very tight, but then we don't know the true dimensions of the lock yet. We like to use very long fenders turned horizontally. Flat fenders can also work on some boats.
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Old 07-31-2017, 07:10 PM   #7
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I did the Erie Canal three years ago. Generally all the locks always have uneven lock walls. Like a tapered funnel. Meaning the right side is a long straight one on approach that you land on, Then as you enter the lock the opposite wall tapers in as you enter so you can enter it under control (slowly). It's not like you have to steam right into the mouth of the lock and hope to be dead center. Don't hurry and enter the lock right after they open the gates. The water swirls for a few seconds. You have to learn how to give it the 'pregnant pause' without being too pokey to let the water calm down inside the lock. Also when approaching a downstream lock that you will be rising in, the discharge from the lock can be quite a whirlpool for a bit after they open the doors. If you have to wait for the people in the lock to exit it usually gives the current time to calm down.
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