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Old 08-22-2016, 07:14 AM   #41
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Owning a boat is continually like having an infant who recently learned to walk. For every great set of steps forward there are complications around the corner; many that must be managed and sometimes tended to in unique ways.
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Old 08-22-2016, 09:54 AM   #42
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Originally Posted by Ski in NC View Post
The best thing is to take boat for a run at least once a month, and run it long enough and hard enough to get all the juices to peak temps.

But that is not always a practical option, understood.

Short runs dockside help keep the surfaces oiled, but do tend to get moisture in oil that won't get cooked out. But it would take many many dockside starts to get moisture level to a harmful point.

But the damage from a corroded cylinder or corroded valve can happen in a period of a few months.

So if you can't go for a run, I think a brief monthly run is the best non-optimal option. I don't think it is beneficial to run all the way up to temp, as what matters is oil temp and that will never get up there dockside.

What I would recommend is start up, when oil pressure gets up, rev engine a little to say 800 or 1000 to get oil slinging around. Run a few minutes, then to idle, then put in reverse. If a twin, you can put one in fwd and one in rev and that limits the strain on dock lines. Maybe a minute in gear. Then to neut, rev up to 1200 for more juice slinging, then idle, then off.

Once you do this for six months in a row, you really should do what it takes to get under way and cook the oil dry.

Also good to run boat hard on it's last trip for winter storage for boats that do that. Dry oil then for all winter.

What he said. ^
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Old 08-22-2016, 12:41 PM   #43
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What he said. ^
What he said
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Old 08-22-2016, 03:14 PM   #44
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I run my engines and generator just long enough to check water flow. This is what I have done for years except I do it once a week if possible. It not only moves things around and puts oil on them, it exposes different valves and pistons to the atmosphere down the open exhaust pipe.

The impellers also stop, hopefully, in a new place thus reducing the chance of getting a set on them.

The very worst thing you can do is run your engines for an extended period at the dock...in gear or not.
I completely disagree with this other than the last two words. Ski, who is a well regarded diesel mechanic here in Eastern NC, lays out a good bare minimum plan if you can't leave the dock.

One of the things I was most grateful to the PO for was the set of immersion block heaters. I kept them on 4 or 5 months a year here once we stopped cruising full time, even if we had used the boat frequently. So many benefits, I went ahead and stuck a Wolverine pad heater on the genset too.

Yes, I know, people get away with storing their boats in the raw winter weather unheated...
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Old 08-22-2016, 04:35 PM   #45
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Here in New England 97% of boats are stored for 6 months each year. No running of engines, extremely little (and very expensive) inside storage. I hate it and it can be hard on engines and all boat systems. If the proper winterizing and storage process is followed things seem to work out.

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Old 08-23-2016, 05:37 AM   #46
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" If the proper winterizing and storage process is followed things seem to work out."

The hassle is many folks wish to not bother with proper engine storage procedure in warmer , "we might use the boat" climates.

I have often thought that it might be possible to rig a push button method to spray fogging oil into an intake could be a simple solution.

At least it might save the cylinders from rusting .
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Old 08-23-2016, 05:42 AM   #47
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One caution , attempting to operate the engine in the slip in gear to raise the load may have you tossed out of the marina.

A prop spinning can move huge amounts of bottom material , into the next slip or into a channel.

Much ungood!
Not in our marina FF. I have 7 metres of water under my boat.
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Old 08-23-2016, 07:24 AM   #48
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One caution , attempting to operate the engine in the slip in gear to raise the load may have you tossed out of the marina.

A prop spinning can move huge amounts of bottom material , into the next slip or into a channel.

Much ungood!
That is exactly the reason I occasionally run our twins in forward gear, well above idle, at fairly low tide, while fastened firmly nosed into our slip... to get the bottom growth out! Luckily there is much room between our dock and other docks. Also, about once a year, there is a "harvester" that comes along and deletes the bottom growth in between dock areas. We're in fresh water and the bottom growth can reach top of water at low tide. At low tide there is still some 3' under our keel... meaning a total of about 6' depth.
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Old 08-23-2016, 02:49 PM   #49
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FWIW, and without regard to care and feeding of engines and genset...


I've been finding that if I don't move the boat about once/week during summer months, once every two weeks at least, bottom and running gear fouling becomes an issue.


Not very practical to have a diver come that often, and divers have a difficult time in our muddy water and shallow marinas, too...


So if no other trips are scheduled, I just try to run the boat up and down the river once a week or so.


And the engines and genset don't seem to mind.





-Chris
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