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Old 12-27-2014, 11:25 PM   #1
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How much will a dinky stowed on deck/ roof affect roll?

Just curious as to much a dinky stowed on deck or roof effect ones rate of roll? Is it enough to take it into consideration for adding a davit on back or crane to place the dinky on deck? Is it enough that folks will take the dinky off and tow it when the seas get rough? Would love to hear some thoughts, opinions or experiences. Thanks.
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Old 12-27-2014, 11:48 PM   #2
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Just curious as to much a dinky stowed on deck or roof effect ones rate of roll? Is it enough to take it into consideration for adding a davit on back or crane to place the dinky on deck? Is it enough that folks will take the dinky off and tow it when the seas get rough? Would love to hear some thoughts, opinions or experiences. Thanks.
That's too much an open-ended question. There are many items needed to form an equation. Could effect roll a lot or barely... Give us something to work with.

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Old 12-28-2014, 07:51 AM   #3
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You would never feel a 50 ft dink on the top deck of a CVN.

Like Art said, what on what.




None on this one
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Old 12-28-2014, 07:52 AM   #4
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In general more weight up high will slow down the roll period, just like a mast on a sailboat does. But it will reduce ultimate roll stability. But a couple of hundred pounds isn't going to do much.

Don't think about towing in rough weather. If you sink your dinghy you will be stuck with a sea anchor off of your stern until conditions improve.

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Old 12-28-2014, 09:27 AM   #5
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Actually David, I respectfully disagree about towing in rough weather (having done it a lot). If you are using the proper bridle and hardware and have the dinghy back at the best distance for conditions, then it's the safest place for it to be!


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Old 12-28-2014, 09:34 AM   #6
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In general more weight up high will slow down the roll period, just like a mast on a sailboat does. But it will reduce ultimate roll stability. But a couple of hundred pounds isn't going to do much.

Don't think about towing in rough weather. If you sink your dinghy you will be stuck with a sea anchor off of your stern until conditions improve.

David
I've towed in fairly rough conditions... but, I have not towed in really rough conditions. Matter of fact, I have always made sure I don't get into moving through really rough conditions if at all possible; as I try to use my pleasure boat for pleasure only. So, I've not had a towed tender sink on me. That said... there was one time when it did get rougher than expected. I kept eye on towed boat and if it did go under I figured cut the line and let her go! Would be a bummer, but - Oh Well!
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Old 12-28-2014, 10:18 AM   #7
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Art and Scott

Thanks for taking the time to reply. We just finished a week on a cat in the BVIs. As one would expect the cat had very little roll which made the wife happy. I really liked having the dinghy on a davit in back. I was able load it by myself. Which made me happy. It made me even happier when the kids would do it. As I look at cockpit motor yachts such as Grand Banks/Hatteras all the dinghies are stowed on top. This looks like a two man operation and it would add to the roll distance? What are your thoughts ?
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Old 12-28-2014, 10:21 AM   #8
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It depends how dinky the dinky is.
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Old 12-28-2014, 10:49 AM   #9
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This dinghy storage thing is a big issue . I would like to store mine on top because it would be out of the way and look better ,but I want o use mine on a regular basis . My thoughts are if it is a PITA to get down you probably Will only use it when you have to . It could be like having to get something out of the attic and you know we all love that .I'm thinking either custom simple davits or weaver davits . I have spent more time drawing , thinking and pestering people about this dinghy storage thing than I care to say .
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Old 12-28-2014, 10:51 AM   #10
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If the dinghy is sized properly for the yacht - no worries. However, you are now expressing concern with another issue - ease of deployment. If that is a major concern, you can always install a TNT lift. It's what I have and it's the easiest deployment imaginable...
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Old 12-28-2014, 12:10 PM   #11
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If the dinghy is sized properly for the yacht - no worries.
That's our problem, in that we bought the best/biggest boat we could afford without borrowing money from the bank, but our dingy needs are pretty extreme.

The smallest dingy we're contemplating is an 11'1" Takacat Explorer takacat.com - The new generation of rigid inflatable catamarans to be used for exploring and photographing BC's outer coast and river estuaries once Badger is safely anchored. It will also have to be deployed quickly when whales, bears, etc are spotted between anchorages.

This is our thinking so far...Badger has an 11' beam, so the 11'1" Takacat may fit on modified Weaver snap davits while docked if the dingy is "scootched" a little to one side. While underway there are four options;

1) Mounted sideways on swimstep (like a parachute underway, good for entering/exiting marinas),
2) lash it to the saloon roof (big, heavy, difficult in wind),
3) tow it (fine for the most part, but might get airborne in big winds),
4) in bigger winds we could tow it with the stern tubes lifted up and attached to some sort of pivoting arrangement on the stern, whereby just the ends of the bow tubes would be in the water. Here's one commercially available example: http://www.dinghy-tow.com/about.htm

Being former sea kayakers, the call of surf landings on outer beaches and thin water (as in inches) exploration is compelling. As an example, there are small uncharted pocket beaches near BC's Cape Caution where the sand is so fine it squeaks when you walk on it.

Maybe this spring...
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Old 12-28-2014, 12:44 PM   #12
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If the dinghy is sized properly for the yacht - no worries. However, you are now expressing concern with another issue - ease of deployment. If that is a major concern, you can always install a TNT lift. It's what I have and it's the easiest deployment imaginable...
Does the TNT lift include a fiberglass swim platform?

It sounds like a good concept unless you have a teak swim platform like some old trawlers.
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Old 12-28-2014, 01:29 PM   #13
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Yes, the fiberglass platform IS the lift. The V-chocks slide into slots on the platform with a simple pull pin to remove. A bonus of the TNT is that it is a pretty large swim platform and once the dinghy is off, you can leave it down in the water for guests to enjoy. Kind of like having a shallow beach at the back of your boat.
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Old 12-28-2014, 01:36 PM   #14
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It sounds like a good concept unless you have a teak swim platform like some old trawlers.
So, let's recap: You remove and sell/discard/burn the old high-maintenance teak swim platform and install a hydraulic dinghy lift/swim platform/wading pool that has NO teak on it...sounds like a win-win to me. The only drawback to the TNT is the cost $$$. REALLY glad the P.O. spent those unrecoverable dollars!
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Old 12-28-2014, 01:59 PM   #15
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Krogen 42s are designed to have a maximum of 750 pounds on the boat deck including the helm chair, all equipment, the dinghy and motor and people. Anything over that reduces stability.
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Old 12-28-2014, 02:30 PM   #16
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So, let's recap: You remove and sell/discard/burn the old high-maintenance teak swim platform and install a hydraulic dinghy lift/swim platform/wading pool that has NO teak on it...sounds like a win-win to me. The only drawback to the TNT is the cost $$$. REALLY glad the P.O. spent those unrecoverable dollars!
TNT appears simply great. Can you provide cost guestimate for your size (what is yours in width/length)? I saw video of operations - WOW - What Fun!
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Old 12-28-2014, 06:52 PM   #17
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Haven't noticed a difference with the eight-foot Trinka on the saloon roof. But then, the Coot is a 14-ton boat.


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Old 12-28-2014, 07:28 PM   #18
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We keep a 650# Boston Whaler (includes the motor) up on the boat deck. It is an easy one person job to launch and takes about 5 Minutes. I can put it up top myself but it is much easier with a helper. Operating the crane. The issue is not the lifting, it's the aligning it properly in the chocks that is the PITA. I will say that with practice we are getting better and faster at doing that. There is no perceptible difference in roll from when we had a 27# inflatable up there.
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Old 12-28-2014, 07:57 PM   #19
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As I said, the cost is the issue. I think the P.O. spent upwards of 30K on the conversion. But I am SURE enjoying it!
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Old 12-28-2014, 07:59 PM   #20
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...takes about 15 seconds from fully up to fully down - and dinghy floating. BTW, we have an 11.5' West Marine RIB with tiller-steered 25hp electric start 4-stroke Soozook. 32 mph.
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