View Poll Results: Hours per day cruising. Total engine hours divided by days cruised
I average less than 0.5 hours per day 2 5.26%
I average 0.5 to 1.0 hours per day 1 2.63%
I average 1.0 to 1.5 hours per day 0 0%
I average 1.5 to 2.0 hours per day 2 5.26%
I average 2.0 to 2.5 hours per day 4 10.53%
I average 2.5 to 3.0 hours per day 5 13.16%
I average 3.0 to 3.5 hours per day 3 7.89%
I average 3.5 to 4.0 hours per day 7 18.42%
I average 4.0 to 5.0 hours per day 4 10.53%
I average more than 5.0 hours per day 10 26.32%
Voters: 38. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-27-2016, 11:43 AM   #21
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Ok, this turned out interesting and a surprise to me too. We cruised to the Broightons last summer and were aboard for 42 days and 819 nm. The total engine hours was 123 for port and 124 for starboard engines. Lehman 120's.
The math works out to 2.9 hours per day. Of course that does not factor in a few things like 3 day weather layover in Nanaimo, two days in Campbell River with our friends getting repairs done, two days in Port Hardy with friends getting more work done, staying in Alert Bay for 3 days because we liked it there, staying two days in Kwatsi Bay because just WOW! and staying 10 days in Shoal Bay because we loved it there.

Nice to go back and read the boat log again as well.
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Old 04-27-2016, 12:00 PM   #22
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Ok, this turned out interesting and a surprise to me too. We cruised to the Broightons last summer and were aboard for 42 days and 819 nm. The total engine hours was 123 for port and 124 for starboard engines. Lehman 120's.
The math works out to 2.9 hours per day. Of course that does not factor in a few things like 3 day weather layover in Nanaimo, two days in Campbell River with our friends getting repairs done, two days in Port Hardy with friends getting more work done, staying in Alert Bay for 3 days because we liked it there, staying two days in Kwatsi Bay because just WOW! and staying 10 days in Shoal Bay because we loved it there.

Nice to go back and read the boat log again as well.
This explains a person's cruising style....a poll of average hrs per day without explanation says ......what? I bet the same number may be posted by 2 people with completely different cruising styles.

Boater A uses the boat 10 times a year for 8 hour round trips to towns just up/down the bay for the night. 4 hrs per day.

Another cruises 120 days up and down the ICW for 2500 miles and puts 480 hrs on the engine. 4 hrs per day.

Now throw in 25 knot cruisers versus 6 knot cruisers.....mind numbing unless presented with narrative.
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Old 04-27-2016, 12:22 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by psneeld;
...mind numbing unless presented with narrative.
Kinda like Reality TV. It isn't.
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Old 04-27-2016, 12:51 PM   #24
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I average over 500 hours a year on the Hobbs, for the three years I have had the Willard. I base out of Seward in the summer and almost anywhere I want to anchor for the night is a minimum of 50 miles away, usually 60-70 nautical miles.

I motor a lot, (because) it beats getting gnawed on by the bugs on shore and if I think there are any fish I throttle back and drop the down rigger and do catch and release. I enjoy watching the shoreline go by, the marine life, the new anchorage every night and I seldom spend the night in the same anchorage two nights in a row unless shrimping.

The season here (for me) is only 4 months long, the wind in the fall and the cold temps in the spring set my season for me. I usually don't run my generator to keep my batteries up, I motor if water conditions permit and save the generator for when they don't.

Everything here is far apart, at 6 knots :-) When I ran the Bayliner I ran the same distances in two hours a day and had to carefully watch every drop of gasoline to be sure to make it back to the harbor. I am liking this diesel and displacement arrangement a lot!
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Old 04-27-2016, 01:11 PM   #25
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I average over 500 hours a year on the Hobbs, for the three years I have had the Willard. I base out of Seward in the summer and almost anywhere I want to anchor for the night is a minimum of 50 miles away, usually 60-70 nautical miles.

I motor a lot, (because) it beats getting gnawed on by the bugs on shore and if I think there are any fish I throttle back and drop the down rigger and do catch and release. I enjoy watching the shoreline go by, the marine life, the new anchorage every night and I seldom spend the night in the same anchorage two nights in a row unless shrimping.

The season here (for me) is only 4 months long, the wind in the fall and the cold temps in the spring set my season for me. I usually don't run my generator to keep my batteries up, I motor if water conditions permit and save the generator for when they don't.

Everything here is far apart, at 6 knots :-) and had to carefully watch every drop of gasoline to be sure to make it back to the harbor. I am liking this diesel and displacement arrangement a lot!
Lol.
Good commentary. I bet when yer shrimpin' you are wearing a grand's worth of Ray Bans and flip flops too, eh?
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Old 04-27-2016, 01:12 PM   #26
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Greetings,
I really don't keep track of hours save for oil changes. I also really don't care if I go anywhere or at what speed. As long as I'm aboard, I consider myself cruising even if still tied to the dock. I'm NOT ashore. I just enjoy floating. We usually run (off the dock) about 200 to 300 hours a year and THAT is a bonus. Where are we going? Don't care. How fast are we getting there? Don't much care either.
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Old 04-27-2016, 01:32 PM   #27
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After 14 hour days on sailboats we graduated to power boats where we leave the dock at 10 AM and are tied up or anchored about 2PM
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Old 04-27-2016, 02:19 PM   #28
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After 14 hour days on sailboats we graduated to power boats where we leave the dock at 10 AM and are tied up or anchored about 2PM
Then you sit through happy hour watching all the 14 hour sailboats fighting rigging, hanging laundry and each other for the last spot.

Do you miss it?
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Old 04-27-2016, 06:07 PM   #29
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It was a poorly worded and created poll. Guilty.

Now, the reason I used hours instead of miles is that miles give a very distorted impression of our cruising. People think we can't be doing that many miles or that we must be cruising 12 hours every day. However, our average daily time cruising is very reasonable and moderate. It's just that we do it faster.

This all came from trying to discuss what we felt was reasonable for a two week time period.
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Old 04-27-2016, 07:10 PM   #30
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Oh believe me...us slow pokes KNOW a lot of people cruise much faster.
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Old 04-27-2016, 07:47 PM   #31
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Oh believe me...us slow pme KNOW a lot of people crise much faster.
And people cruise faster than us. And people faster than them. My wife has occasionally dreamed of a 60 mph Nortech. But then a 90 mph Fountain would still go flying past. Our Riva runs 42 knots, cruises at 37. For a center console that would be slow in today's world as the basic ones cruise 50-60 knots and the fast ones 70 knots.
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Old 04-27-2016, 08:05 PM   #32
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And people cruise faster than us. And people faster than them. My wife has occasionally dreamed of a 60 mph Nortech. But then a 90 mph Fountain would still go flying past. Our Riva runs 42 knots, cruises at 37. For a center console that would be slow in today's world as the basic ones cruise 50-60 knots and the fast ones 70 knots.
Not quite cruising boats though....

One real issue with speed on the loop or for snow birders is just so many places and for other boats you have to slow down.

Not enough to warrant not having the speed, but it used to drive me nuts delivering boats capable of 20 to 30 knot cruising and so much of the trip you are being hard on the engines with the ups and downs.
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Old 04-27-2016, 09:09 PM   #33
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Not quite cruising boats though....

One real issue with speed on the loop or for snow birders is just so many places and for other boats you have to slow down.

Not enough to warrant not having the speed, but it used to drive me nuts delivering boats capable of 20 to 30 knot cruising and so much of the trip you are being hard on the engines with the ups and downs.
Yes, the canals with the 5 mph and 10 mph limits. I'm sure the moment we hit Lake Ontario we'll be ready to run at speed. The Great Lakes will be nice for speed. For the snow birders who like the ICW a lot of slowing down. We prefer running outside and speed works there.

A lot of the view of speed is where one is coming from. Sailboaters look at it entirely different than those who had fast bowriders or ski boats on lakes. We were use to cruising at 35 to 40 knots on the lake even if only had an hour's worth of distance available.
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Old 04-28-2016, 08:15 AM   #34
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For us, the trip is the destination. Once a boating (dock bound, mostly) friend asked us where we were going on our cruise. I said "Sanford, FL" (the farthest a big boat can go on the St Johns River in Florida). She said "What are you going to do there?" I said "Turn around and come back."


The point is, we weren't cruising to Sanford, we were cruising the AICW and the St Johns River. Sanford was nice but so were the other towns and cities along the way. And the remote anchorages.


There are a few places where being able to go fast would be nice, but in general, seven knots is a good speed to enjoy the scenery and wildlife.
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Old 04-28-2016, 10:11 AM   #35
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There are a few places where being able to go fast would be nice, but in general, seven knots is a good speed to enjoy the scenery and wildlife.
We love the scenery and wildlife, but we also love the coastal towns with all their heritage and character. In my Corporate life I had many places I'd been but never seen. Fly in, work, fly out, never a day to even know the city. Boating we don't want to do that. So we love the cruising and we love the towns along the way. However, if the towns don't interest you and just the scenery and wildlife does then that's perfectly ok.

One other thing we do a lot of. When we're in an area, we get in our RIB and explore the shore and banks up close, dive into the areas one can't get a larger boat (Jet Rib) and see everything like that. I'm sure many of you who anchor do similar. Amazing how close one can get to some amazing wildlife.
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Old 04-28-2016, 11:08 AM   #36
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how about this.... if you were cruising lets say up or down the intercoastal how many hour per day would you run ????
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Old 04-28-2016, 11:14 AM   #37
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how about this.... if you were cruising lets say up or down the intercoastal how many hour per day would you run ????
What speed?

I would ask what are your cruising habits?

Town to town? Anchorage to anchorage? Daybreak to sunset? Etc..etc...

Still so many variables without the narrative of what people cruise for.....
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Old 04-28-2016, 11:20 AM   #38
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how about this.... if you were cruising lets say up or down the intercoastal how many hour per day would you run ????
I would average around 4, which would probably be 8 every other day or sometimes 0 for two days followed by a 12 hour day. i do think anyway you obtain it, averaging 4 per day is a nice leisurely pace.
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Old 04-28-2016, 11:27 AM   #39
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The ringer is...sometimes I would rather put in a couple long days to make up for being able to sit for a few. Sure it still averages out if you cruise enough...but I use the same reasoning when driving a car sometimes. If the stay doesn't outweigh the driving round trip...it better be something dang important.

Without explaining each style of cruising, even when some use them all......the what info are you really passing?
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Old 04-28-2016, 12:29 PM   #40
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how about this.... if you were cruising lets say up or down the intercoastal how many hour per day would you run ????
Think a great deal of that depends on where you are. I've done as little as 30 miles (4 hours) to stop at a particular destination, and close to 100 miles (12 hours) when the flow was going my way. Ideally 40 to 75 miles (6 to 11 hours) is my preference.

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