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Old 06-17-2016, 10:32 PM   #21
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I agree, way too short.
I wish I had more, but out of storage space.
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Old 06-17-2016, 10:34 PM   #22
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I always recommend you carry six, all about the length of your vessel.
Pretty much the same reasoning that Menzies used.

All the same size because you can grab any of the lines and it will be long enough.

If I back into a slip, I'll use all six.
Two bow lines to the outer pilings. Two stern lines crossed. Two forward springs to the outer pilings to keep the stern off the dock.

I splice big eyes, about three feet, in one end so it will be easy to drop over a piling or a cleat. A twelve or 18" eye is too small to drop over a piling. When I talk about the size of they eye, I mean the distance between the splice and the furthest point where the rope turns back to the splice if the rope is stretched out. A three foot eye, 36", could form a circle with a 72" circumference or about a two foot diameter.

The other ends are tied to the onboard cleats which allows me to adjust the length from aboard the boat.
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Old 06-17-2016, 10:45 PM   #23
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We have settled on 12. Six to remain at our home slip and six to carry with us. That's four, one for each corner and two longer for springs (...times 2). We've tape-marked the home lines so that we simply pull 'em in to the mark and cleat 'em.

Lazy is good! (If expensive!)
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Old 06-17-2016, 10:51 PM   #24
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Take all my lines with me. Once left a 50-foot water hose on dock from my permanent slip. It disappeared. Someone might have thought I'd abandoned it. If you're feeling guilty, please return the hose.
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Old 06-18-2016, 12:04 AM   #25
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Quote:
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I agree, way too short.
I ended up buying a full spool of Samson MFP Floatline. 3/8" . I used 100' of it to make some lines for my kayaks, but still have 500' on the spool for stern tying. More than I need but I will use up some of it for things over time.
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Old 06-18-2016, 12:09 AM   #26
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We have settled on 12. Six to remain at our home slip and six to carry with us. That's four, one for each corner and two longer for springs (...times 2). We've tape-marked the home lines so that we simply pull 'em in to the mark and cleat 'em.

Lazy is good! (If expensive!)
I like to use 3 strand for my permanent dock lines. I splice loops in one end. The lines are tied to the dock cleats and the loops on the boat. The 3 strand holds up well, is relatively inexpensive, and has good shock absorption. These lines are just left in place. I have yet to have a line go missing.
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Old 06-18-2016, 12:48 AM   #27
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Still, 300 feet!

Last time, we simply anchored in 12 feet of water.

The line can be looped around something on shore and doubled back to the boat. Makes it easy for leaving. Like Ayala Cove on the moorings.
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Old 06-18-2016, 09:10 AM   #28
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What's better? Braided or three strand?
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Old 06-18-2016, 09:34 AM   #29
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What's better? Braided or three strand?
Depends on the application. Three strand stretches more, so it's better for anchor rode and snubbers. It's also easier to splice. Braid is a little stronger size for size, and IMO feels better in hand, so we use it for docklines.
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Old 06-18-2016, 12:12 PM   #30
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What's better? Braided or three strand?
As I mentioned, I use three strand for permanent dock lines in my home slip. I like the stretch and they are less expensive.

Braided are easier to handle. They stay more flexible, easier to coil and store, and look better (important to my wife). I keep braided on the boat for my traveling lines.

I left 7 lines on the boat. One 5/8" x 40', two 5/8" x 20, two 3/4" x 40', two 3/4" x 20'. While I use the 3/4" most of the time, I kept the lighter lines for those times when a dock may not have adequately sized cleats, or I want to use my slip knot technique for leaving.
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Old 06-18-2016, 02:29 PM   #31
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Minimum six but I carry 8. Two are 10' longer than the boat to allow 3' loopl for unusual piling arrays.


I never use pre spliced always use bowlines for ease of undoing lines in marinas.
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Old 06-18-2016, 02:32 PM   #32
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I never use pre spliced always use bowlines for ease of undoing lines in marinas.
Can you elaborate on this?
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Old 06-18-2016, 02:58 PM   #33
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I think he's talking about using a bowline knot to make a loop.
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Old 06-18-2016, 03:01 PM   #34
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I think he's talking about using a bowline knot to make a loop.
OK. Not sure how that is easier in a marina...

So often it is hard for me to visualize what boaters do in other parts of the country since it seems as if their docking situations are so radically different than those here in the PNW.
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Old 06-19-2016, 12:18 AM   #35
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Dave,

If you ever go through the Ballard Locks you will need at least one 50' line or the lockmasters will chew you up and spit you out like old tobacco.

I probably have 8-10 lines that we take with us and they vary from 1/2" to 3/4" and from 15' to 30' long. I've never needed a line as long as the boat and can't imagine where I would use one.

In the slip, I have 9 lines that I leave on the dock when we pull out.
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Old 06-19-2016, 01:29 AM   #36
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Dock lines are a bit like torches, hard to have too many on board.
I keep on board the reel we take 3 strand from to make up our lines, just in case. We do our own splicing, but the bowline knot is handy.
The chandlery chain "Whitworths" has cut pre-spliced docklines on special once or twice a year, an opportunity to stock up, usually the soft flexible black variety.
We have fixed docklines, but rig a couple of lines onboard in case of the unexpected while docking.
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Old 06-19-2016, 07:12 AM   #37
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Bowlines are easier at places where people will put their loop over yours without dipping it.


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Old 06-19-2016, 09:04 AM   #38
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Can you elaborate on this?

Many marinas use pols between two boats. The second to arrive often puts his loop over the first. If the first wants to leave his line in buried under the loop of the second and difficult if not impossible to lift over the top of the pola. Using a knot to form a loop means tht you simply untie the knot then can work the line out of the tangle without dealing too much with the other guys line.

Smart people will clain you can dip your line through the other guys loop but that isnt always easy to undo if there is tension on his line pulling in an awkwayd direction.
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Old 06-19-2016, 09:11 AM   #39
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PS with a bowline I have great flexability. Small loop or big, tight loop snug to the pole or big loose one. Aslo eithe end can do for any use.
For those worried about bowlines loosening under streach relase conditions I always tie a half hitch with the tail on the loop side of the bowline.
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Old 06-19-2016, 09:22 AM   #40
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PS with a bowline I have great flexability. Small loop or big, tight loop snug to the pole or big loose one. Aslo eithe end can do for any use.
For those worried about bowlines loosening under streach relase conditions I always tie a half hitch with the tail on the loop side of the bowline.
I agree that bowlines are better in many situations.


For tying to pilings I usually try one complete round turn around the pole and two half hitches. I find it stays put better than a bowline (or fiddling with the bowline till tight enough) and doesn't work so tight like a clove hitch that you struggle to get it undone in a hurry.
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