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Old 07-16-2015, 11:40 AM   #41
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I do give a quick smile when I vacuum...
And how often is that?
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My passion for improving my boat(s) exceeds my desire to constantly cruise them.
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Old 07-16-2015, 11:53 AM   #42
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I finally got around to watching the Hiscock's "Beyond the West Horizon" movie on YouTube last weekend. Great movie. Funny to see the scenes they filmed are often the same as what people to today film/photograph.

There is a bit in the movie were Eric says that they have 80 gallons of water on board and that they could last 80 days with that supply! I really wonder if he misspoke because that is only 1/2 gallon per person per day.

Later,
Dan
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Old 07-16-2015, 11:54 AM   #43
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with a small boat every week or when it needs it like when the dog is aboard ofr doing a project that involves dust/chunks.
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Old 07-16-2015, 11:57 AM   #44
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I finally got around to watching the Hiscock's "Beyond the West Horizon" movie on YouTube last weekend. Great movie. Funny to see the scenes they filmed are often the same as what people to today film/photograph.

There is a bit in the movie were Eric says that they have 80 gallons of water on board and that they could last 80 days with that supply! I really wonder if he misspoke because that is only 1/2 gallon per person per day.

Later,
Dan
Drinking water only?

When I first deployed aboard USCG cutters in the early 80s...we were still taking salt water showers, laundry was done in salt water, heads were salt water, I don't know if the galley used salt water for rinsing dishes but my sailboat as most were set up with salt water in the galley....

So for some...fresh water is really only important for drinking.
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Old 07-16-2015, 12:00 PM   #45
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So for some...fresh water is really only important for drinking.
I had the same experience in the Navy.
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Old 07-16-2015, 12:07 PM   #46
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I had the same experience in the Navy.
Doing it and liking it are still a big difference...


Survival schools and Boy Scouts was even worse with cleaning stuff with dirt and sand...then a bare rinse...so salt water cleaning almost seemed like a step up...


With high altitude, arctic and Kodiak survival schools....by the time you drug enough fuel for the fire to melt the snow into water....you were too tired to give a sh**.
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Old 07-16-2015, 02:53 PM   #47
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Drinking water only?

When I first deployed aboard USCG cutters in the early 80s...we were still taking salt water showers, laundry was done in salt water, heads were salt water, I don't know if the galley used salt water for rinsing dishes but my sailboat as most were set up with salt water in the galley....

So for some...fresh water is really only important for drinking.
The Hiscocks were on a 30 foot boat in 1952. The only showed fresh water being used to drink and maybe cook. They washed clothes in small pans which they also used to splash salt water over themselves for a shower.

My next book will be one of theirs. I hope they explain the water usage and how they dealt with the sun. In the film, they do show a cover over the tiller. Maybe they took it down to film. I don't see how they could have been exposed to the sun and not consumed more water. Depending on the point of sail, they had to hand steer for day, after day, after day....

I had typed up more but the %^&*( browser crashed and I lost it all.

Later,
Dan
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Old 07-16-2015, 03:20 PM   #48
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Drinking water only?
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I had the same experience in the Navy.
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Doing it and liking it are still a big difference...


Survival schools and Boy Scouts was even worse with cleaning stuff with dirt and sand...then a bare rinse...so salt water cleaning almost seemed like a step up...
...
We used to wash our pans and plates in the sand when we went camping. I am sure that is now against a gazzilion Federal and State laws since it was sand in a stream.

On my dads sail boat, fresh water was for cooking and cleaning. We just jumped of the boat to rinse off the soap. Worked for me. Just dry off quickly to avoid that icky salt feeling. Well, there was that time I almost jumped off the boat but I saw the water was full of billions and billions of small jelly fish!

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Old 07-16-2015, 03:31 PM   #49
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Doing it and liking it are still a big difference...
That's a huge difference. People on boating forums, especially sailing forums, tend to ask and answer a lot of questions with "Can". I can do a lot of things I sure don't want to do or intend to do. It's like the girl rescued in Washington after the plane crash. She drank a little river water, scared to drink too much, but knowing she must take the chance on some.

To me boating is for pleasure, so I do things in such a way to maximize that pleasure. I don't do anything to prove I can to myself or others. I've watched Survivor occasionally over time. I'm in good condition. I probably could do that as well as most of those my age. But I sure can't grasp why I would subject myself to what they go through if I didn't have to.

There are certain things in life that if we didn't have we'd miss very little. But rationing of water is not something we'd want to do. If we didn't have a watermaker, then we'd make extra trips to get water at marinas before giving up some of the things that to us have become necessities although we know they really aren't. I think the correct word or the word that comes closest is necessaries.
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Old 07-16-2015, 05:32 PM   #50
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Used to hate flying off the cutters in the Caribbean back then...the suckers would change course towards the nearest thunderstorm so the crew could go out on deck and take rain showers, clean the ship, not sure if they collected any....


Anyway...back before GPS, LORAN C or any decent navigation instruments were installed in the helos....finding the ship low on fuel and flying towards that weather made taking salt water showers seem...well...small in the big scheme of things......
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Old 07-16-2015, 07:26 PM   #51
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I've watched Survivor occasionally over time. I'm in good condition. I probably could do that as well as most of those my age. But I sure can't grasp why I would subject myself to what they go through if I didn't have to. .
Jeff Probst used to work for us and one of my co-workers stays in regular touch with him. Not a good idea to use Survivor as an actual example of surviving. The "survival" exercises and outcomes are carefully scripted and planned. It's a game show/soap opera, pure and simple. There is a big crew and support system on site; nobody actually gets hurt, goes hungry or thirsty, or is at any risk whatsoever on location.

There are some so-called "survival" shows on which the situations are actually fairly real. Survivor is not one of them.
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Old 07-16-2015, 07:46 PM   #52
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nobody actually gets hurt, goes hungry or thirsty, or is at any risk whatsoever on location.
.
While there is a big crew and support, several people have gotten badly hurt. The weight losses, the bites and cuts, are also real. No reality show is complete reality but those on Survivor do face some real challenges I certainly don't choose to face.
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Old 07-17-2015, 06:34 AM   #53
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The early technique was to lower the mainsail enough to have a loose foot where rain water could wash the sail for a while and then be captured to fill the onboard tanks.

If it really rained the cockpit scuppers would be blocked to create a large bath tub.

Which also served as a clothes wash and rinse.

If you enjoy early sailing adventures , read some of the Tillman books.
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