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Old 02-07-2016, 02:51 AM   #1
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How easy is your embarkation?

It's as easy as pie for us. (click on the photo)

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Old 02-07-2016, 02:54 AM   #2
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Couldn't be easier for us also...

Ok, ok, I admit it...I got sucked in their by Marks trick so he can show off more pics of his boat. Never was there a vessel so adored by its owner - yagodda give him credit for that at least...
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Old 02-07-2016, 02:58 AM   #3
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You mean leave the slip? For us it's back out, pivot the boat 90 degrees with opposed thrust and rudder and we're gone.
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Old 02-07-2016, 04:27 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
You mean leave the slip? For us it's back out, pivot the boat 90 degrees with opposed thrust and rudder and we're gone.
No Marin. Embarking is getting on...and disembark is...need I go on...but you knew that...
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Old 02-07-2016, 05:46 AM   #5
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Perhaps Mark meant "to embark" as in start a voyage (judging by his video). If so, I do the same as Marin except I start my motors first, then back out
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Old 02-07-2016, 06:37 AM   #6
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OPACMARE hydraulic gangway, just in case.
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Old 02-07-2016, 07:07 AM   #7
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"OPACMARE hydraulic gangway, just in case. "


Olivier, now that is sweet!!
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Old 02-07-2016, 07:37 AM   #8
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Quote:
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"OPACMARE hydraulic gangway, just in case. "


Olivier, now that is sweet!!
Thank you Dimer2.

Here is a better view of the hydraulic gangway what works with a 4 directions (up - down - slide in - slide out) switch + remote control. The left railing is automatically folding when sliding in the gangway.

Very convenient if we are mooring in "Mediterranean style" in some places over here. This hydraulic gangway can be used as telescopic crane (up to 650 lb payload) to load up and down the tender on the swim platform.

Today we are aboard but it's strongly raining, then sorry I can't show off the crane use in practice.
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Old 02-07-2016, 08:50 AM   #9
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Quote:
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No Marin. Embarking is getting on...and disembark is...need I go on...but you knew that...
There are times I wish I could disembark the puppy!
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Old 02-07-2016, 11:49 AM   #10
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Our embarkation is even easier than Coot's. We pull straight out of the slip. Coming back is probably more difficult because I back into the slip. Where I position the boat before backing in depends on the direction and strength of the wind. I like to back upwind to the slip if the winds are blowing.


Out in front of our slip it's wide open, no docks, no obstructions except for a bridge about 1/4 mile away. Easy Peasy.
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Old 02-07-2016, 05:47 PM   #11
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Quote:
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No Marin. Embarking is getting on...and disembark is...need I go on...but you knew that...
That's how I take it. Stepping on or stepping off.

Having now clicked on the video, he apparently means leaving the dock.

In my case (my marina) it's simpler than that because I dock stern to like all the other boats. All I have to do is pull out and turn to port.

Now getting docked stern to in the first place is another story ...................
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Old 02-07-2016, 06:09 PM   #12
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I too think the common use of embarkation as "the act of boarding"....


You can embark (begin) on a trip or wait to embark a ship/plane, the act of boarding is the embarkation.
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Old 02-07-2016, 06:22 PM   #13
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Scott is correct. Embarkation is boarding, you will do it prior to leaving the slip which is a departure.

And embarking is easy, just open the door on whichever side deck is against the dock. None of this hopping onto stern platforms or climbing over anything.
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Old 02-07-2016, 07:11 PM   #14
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I have a large stern platform maybe 6 inches above water with big SS staples to hold. The platform is accessible from a transom door with about 6 inches of drop. This allows for access from dinghy or low floating docks. For higher docks my cockpit side deck is low and wide there are lockers and step to get to this level where it is easy to step on and off the boat there is also a SS support post for roof as a convenient hand grab. Low center of gravity low freeboard boats usually do not have problems. High slab sided boats and large catamarans can be difficult. Some of the French cats look like they are made for rock and mountain climbers.
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Old 02-07-2016, 10:43 PM   #15
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Boarding the Coot from a floating platform only requires stepping over the 18-inch gunwale midship. All but the handicapped are capable. Only one passenger has needed the assistance of a six-inch step to board. No stairs, no walking the plank, no "crotch walk" and no dangling at the edge of a swim step.



Have never berthed Mediterranean style, but in that instance I'd place fenders between the raised swim platform and dock, and lower the central railing/ladder, resulting in three steps at most to board the stern.

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Old 02-07-2016, 11:52 PM   #16
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Our boat is always bow in to the slip, pointing into the prevailing winds. To embark onto the boat I use a home built set of 2 steps built from 2x10's to give easy access into the cockpit. I also use the steps as a base for sawing, clamping. painting, mixing epoxy etc. when needed. The steps are butt ugly. looking more like a well used workbench than a boarding platform, but they suit the purpose.


As far as leaving the berth, umm... we just leave. Nothing to be concerned about, unless the wind is 25+ kts.
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Old 02-08-2016, 08:02 AM   #17
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In the true sense of embarking and disembarking, it depends on the dock situation. With a floating dock it's just a matter of stepping from the dock to the swim platform and through the transom door.


At fixed docks, it depends on the height of the dock and the state of the tide. Our boat has steps in the cockpit so it's usually a matter of using the steps.
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Old 02-08-2016, 10:39 AM   #18
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WOW! Mark posted a terrific video of his "leaving the slip" and the response
was a lesson in "definitions." I, for one, do it exactly the way mark does when "leaving the slip" but I don't have near the room (fairway) that he seems to have. Nice video and I never get tired of seeing that boat!
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Old 02-08-2016, 11:36 AM   #19
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For easy embarkation Willy needs to be pulled in close aft. Willy's sides aren't straight or slab sided like most trawlers so that leaves the bow hanging out a bit. Not a problem unless "helpers" are involved tying up and they always pull the bow in tight. Willy's sides are much like a sailboat .. that is .. curved.

If I tie her straight fore and aft embarking is frequently done amidships over the cap rail and under the life line. I tie her straight at times for storms .. frequently w double fenders amidships.

As an aside I think water flows more naturally and easily on curved sides unless planing .. and many planing designs have mildly curved sides especially aft.
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Old 02-08-2016, 12:33 PM   #20
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We have a short section of grab rail near the pilot house doors grab it and step over gunwale , maybe 20" to deck .
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