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Old 10-01-2012, 04:18 PM   #81
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While I love solitude as much as anyone else here...it isn't easy to find when a second cruiser is there or comes along...whether you like the guys guitar playing or not play on whether you LIKE or DISLIKE that now not quiet anchorage...It can be too much aircraft noise to trucks on a distant highway to the generator across the water. Yes the noisy ones are a PIA and if directly downwind I understand...but the original comment painted the whole issue with a broad stroke that I felt as a little harsh to those who have and chose to use their gensets.... Being polite carries way beyond just a genset issue in anchorages.

Wonder what these are??? Must be BIG coffee makers....
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Old 10-01-2012, 04:59 PM   #82
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Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
73 (now 74) responses to "How do you make coffee?"

I guess we should be able to do it now if we couldn't before.
As the OP, I am glad it went on this long (and generally stayed on-topic). I was really interested in all the different ways people made their morning Joe without killing the batteries at anchor. Even though it only takes a few minutes, out Mr. Coffee smoked away 80 Amps from the batteries. There HAS to be a better way and now I know about all of them.

:l ol:
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Old 10-01-2012, 08:18 PM   #83
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As the OP, I am glad it went on this long (and generally stayed on-topic). I was really interested in all the different ways people made their morning Joe without killing the batteries at anchor. Even though it only takes a few minutes, out Mr. Coffee smoked away 80 Amps from the batteries. There HAS to be a better way and now I know about all of them.

:l ol:
"Amps" aren't things that are removed from the battery. Electrical current use over time is measured in amp hours, an amp hour being one amp of current flowing for one hour.

If your inverter drew 80 amps for ten minutes, that's 13.33 amp hours. We would hope that's nowhere near the capacity of your house bank even considering it's best to use only 50% of capacity. As a point of refference, my house bank has a capacity of about 400 amp hours so I could brew coffee using your coffe maker continuously for fifteen hours and stay within the recommended 50% of discharge. And of course, once you start your engine(s) you begin to replenish the power that you consumed.

But other ways work as well. On a previous boat, I boiled water and poured it through a Melita filter and holder into a cup.
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Old 10-01-2012, 08:27 PM   #84
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Even though it only takes a few minutes, out Mr. Coffee smoked away 80 Amps from the batteries. There HAS to be a better way and now I know about all of them.
You don't realize how much power seemingly insignificant AC appliances draw until you start powering them from batteries. Microwaves are the same way.

This is one reason we dumped the Mr. Coffee that was on our boat when we got it. Didn't want to start the generator every time we wanted coffee, didn't want to suck the power out of the batteries, and the thing took up galley space that was more useful for other purposes. We carry plenty of propane so it seemed a no brainer to use that and a French press instead of the electric coffee maker.
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Old 10-01-2012, 08:41 PM   #85
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Propane stove....doesn't take any longer than the electric perc....
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Old 10-01-2012, 10:26 PM   #86
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I'm sitting here drinking coffee from my "Handpresso" portable, manual espresso maker. I heated the water on an induction cooktop, but if I want to "run silent" early in the morning, I heat water on the one burner butane stove (cartridges stored on deck).

dvd
This is a great idea. I tend to be an early riser. Moving around in the galley making coffee disturbs others' sleep. There is a perfect place to set up this little one burner butane unit. The helm deck has a wet bar with ice maker. I can make my morning coffee to drink in the cockpit or on the helm deck. I am happy, and no one is disturbed. Thanks for posting this.
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Old 10-01-2012, 11:57 PM   #87
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Thumbs down Morning Java: It's not for amateurs

This topic of coffee came up seven years ago on the Cape Dory forum. At the time I owned a very nice little 27 foot sailboat with two group 27 batteries and an oil-fired stove. With that as background, below is my little tongue-in-cheek posting on the subject. I must disclose that I now I have a drip coffee pot, 400 AH of batteries and and big inverter. To preserve a little NW dignity, I still grind the beans by hand using the knee mill.

From my 2005 posting on the subject of brewing coffee...

In a recent topic the subject of morning coffee was broached. Now, I'm not a coffee snob, really, but after reading that some of you might be brewing coffee in 12V percolators obtained from truck stops, I felt morally obligated to step in. You see, I live near Seattle, home of Starbucks. We practically invented coffee here.

Coffee is so important to Northwest boaters I that I'm going to suggest that John Vigor's new book be titled "Making Coffee Afloat: And 19 Other Useful Ceremonies, Superstitions, Prayers, Rituals, and Curses".


I can't do the topic justice here, but I'll try to cover the basics of brewing coffee. I don't have the equipment for latte's at sea, so for latte's I either dinghy ashore, or wait for the latte boat to come around. I've been thinking about yanking out the Yanmar and installing a steam engine. I figure with a good source of steam on board, I could have latte's even while underway.


A great cup of coffee starts with a quality roasted whole bean. It doesn't matter where it's grown, as long as it's passed through a Seattle port and roasting company. Starbucks or Seattle's Best are both good brands.


You'll need a good grinder. I use a Zassenhaus Model 156 knee mill. These are adjustable so that you can get the perfect grind. They don't use electricity and take very little space. These mills aren't cheap, but unless they've been abused they'll last forever. I bought mine on ebay. If you buy used, make sure the burrs haven't been damaged. The Zassenhaus mills have hardened burrs so they're unlikely to be worn. When you get right down to it, we're talking about coffee, so price really shouldn't be an issue. You'll want to periodically clean the burrs by grinding uncooked rice.




The Zassenhaus knee mill has a little compartment on top that holds just about the right number of beans for my coffee press (as you gain experience, you won't need to count the individual beans).


My coffee press is the BonJour 3-cup model shown here. It's made of polycarbonate and seems to be unbreakable. The only thing you need to watch with this unit is the removable rubber base. You'll want to take the base off before you commit the grounds to Neptune, otherwise you run the risk of loosing it overboard.




Ok, so you have the beans, the grinder and the press. You'll also need an accurate timepiece. Any modern quartz watch with fresh batteries will do, or you can use the time display on your GPS unit. The GPS unit offers the best accuracy as the time base is a rubidium clock. Note that some of the satellites use cesium clocks. This won't affect the taste. Avoid using balance wheel watches and clocks.


Finally, you need good water. Obtaining high quality water while afloat is an advanced topic that I'm not going to attempt to cover here. Perhaps John can include a few chapters on water in his book.


At this point, you can use almost any method available to heat the water provided you don't introduce contaminates (a charcoal grill is out). You can probably even use that trucker's 12V coffee pot if it's clean and you have the batteries for it. I find that I can obtain good results with a diesel stove. A coffee snob would probably object to heating the water in an aluminum container, but my palate isn't so refined that I can tell the difference. Even so, it would probably be best to use a glass or Pyrex pan.


Now that you have the right equipment, here's how you make coffee in 10 easy steps:


1. Fill a clean pan with water and apply heat.

2. Fill the grinder's hopper with beans and grind while the water is heating
3. Just before the water is comes to a boil, put a little bit in the coffee press to preheat it.
4. Just as the water comes to a boil, empty the coffee press and pour in the coffee from the little drawer on the coffee grinder. I do all of this over a paper towel because it can be a little messy if you're not careful. I find that it's best to open the drawer while holding the mill over the press.
5. Note the time and pour the boiling water over the grounds, filling the press. Leave enough room to install plunger. I fill to the top of the handle band.
6. Install the press plunger and push the filter screen down just far enough to submerge the coffee. On the BonJour press turn the top so that the pouring spout is covered by the integral shield. This will keep the coffee from cooling as quickly.
7. After four minutes, use some of the leftover boiling water to preheat the coffee cups.
8. After six minutes, slowly press the on the plunger to push the screen all of the way to the bottom. This traps the grounds at the bottom. How tightly you trap the grounds is a matter of taste.
9. Empty the preheat water from the cups.
10. Turn the BonJour lid so the pouring screen covers the pouring spout, fill your coffee cup and enjoy.

That's it. It's not difficult, but you'll probably want to practice several times at home before heading out to sea.
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Old 10-02-2012, 12:14 AM   #88
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Originally Posted by dvd
I'm sitting here drinking coffee from my "Handpresso" portable, manual espresso maker. I heated the water on an induction cooktop, but if I want to "run silent" early in the morning, I heat water on the one burner butane stove (cartridges stored on deck).

Quote:
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This is a great idea. I tend to be an early riser. Moving around in the galley making coffee disturbs others' sleep. There is a perfect place to set up this little one burner butane unit. The helm deck has a wet bar with ice maker. I can make my morning coffee to drink in the cockpit or on the helm deck. I am happy, and no one is disturbed. Thanks for posting this.


I can well appreciate your enthusiasms for early morning coffee, and being an early riser I do same when at home, in our Nor Cal beach house or in a hotel/condo on vaca! But... On our Tolly family boat... with children, grand kids, extended portions thereof, or Admiral herself aboard alone with me... I spend time reading or futzing on items aboard till all coffee drinkers awake. Then we each dive into the Big C-Pot simultaneously to help maintain a semblance of morning energy level continuity! Yeah Baby! Coffee, Coffee, COFFEE... Makes Us Feel So Fine!!!
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Old 10-02-2012, 12:57 AM   #89
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I don't drink coffee unless someone else makes it. At most, consume 24 cups a year. Most people seem to be addicted. Awful to think much generator usage is due to coffee drinking.
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Old 10-02-2012, 01:09 AM   #90
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I don't drink coffee unless someone else makes it. At most, consume 24 cups a year. Most people seem to be addicted. Awful to think much generator usage is due to coffee drinking.
Mark - Why do you even bother with just 2 cups-minus of coffee per month? That would drive me crazzzzzy. Sort of like having only one bite of steak per week... Oh the Humanity!

And, Yeah - I do love steak too!! LOL
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Old 10-02-2012, 01:45 AM   #91
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I don't drink coffee unless someone else makes it. At most, consume 24 cups a year. Most people seem to be addicted. Awful to think much generator usage is due to coffee drinking.
I'm in your camp, Mark. I only drink coffee when I think I need a "kick" to keep driving at night or get going in the morning (like getting up at oh-dark-thirty to go steelhead fishing in February and you know you're not going to get a bite until 2 in the afternoon) and I usually don't drink it at all unless it's cold outside. The only coffee I drink is a double espresso because that's the strongest the coffee joints have. I actually don't like the taste of coffee very much--- I can tell good coffee from bad but it's not a taste I care for.

The whole coffee addiction is bizarre to me, particularly the people who take twenty minutes to describe what they want to the barista ("....and put the sprinkles on the side so I can put them on myself.")

And I think Starbuck's coffee tastes like absolute crap. Very bitter and acidic, nothing redeeming about it at all except it's handy.

Beijing on this last trip had some surprisingly good local coffee house chains, and I've had coffee I "liked" in Vienna and Dubai although that may have had more to do with the ambiance than the coffee itself. And there are some local coffee brands in the Puget Sound area that do a good job.

But most of the time I have no desire for the stuff. There are plenty of drinks I do have a desire for, but coffee's not one of them.
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Old 10-02-2012, 06:10 AM   #92
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Does anyone have experience with powering one of those counter top induction stoves, as advertised endlessly on TV , from a cheap Chop Chop inverter?
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Old 10-02-2012, 06:41 AM   #93
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If any generator owners out there are former sailors and think they should be run only when the boat is bought and sold...well good luck.

Having spent as much time working on generators as main engines on many boats, I think the expression 'use it or lose it" is very appropriate.

I believe in being polite and a good neighbors but as I said before...many complainers of generator users have boating habits that are just are just as annoying or disturbing.
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Old 10-02-2012, 07:51 AM   #94
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Exactly!
My 27 year old Onan manual clearly states to work your generator monthly if not used often.


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If any generator owners out there are former sailors and think they should be run only when the boat is bought and sold...well good luck.

Having spent as much time working on generators as main engines on many boats, I think the expression 'use it or lose it" is very appropriate.

I believe in being polite and a good neighbors but as I said before...many complainers of generator users have boating habits that are just are just as annoying or disturbing.
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Old 10-02-2012, 08:00 AM   #95
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Does anyone have experience with powering one of those counter top induction stoves, as advertised endlessly on TV , from a cheap Chop Chop inverter?
I haven't seen the advertisement, but in general, electric heat consumes a lot of powert. I'm not sure what you mean by a "cheap Chop Chop inverter", but you're probably going to need an 1800 watt (minimum) inverter and a battery bank sufficient to power it without a significant voltage drop.

"Cheap" is relative of course, but I don't think you will be able to call what you need to operate an electric stove "cheap".
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Old 10-02-2012, 08:03 AM   #96
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Exactly!
My 27 year old Onan manual clearly states to work your generator monthly if not used often.
A land based standby generator usually has an automatic exercise program that operates the generator under load for at least fifteen minutes once a week.

I'm taliking about installed generators, not the ones you store in your garage and bring out once a year when there's a power failure.
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Old 10-02-2012, 08:30 AM   #97
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FF -

I do not have an inverter on board, but my induction cooktop is 1300W (max power), 15 Amps. I run it off my 110 circuit, either shore power or generator, on a 15A breaker and 20A switch.

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Old 10-02-2012, 10:28 AM   #98
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You realize, I hope, that some people in the South don't even have air conditioning in their homes. And our service men and women don't have it in their tents in Iraq and Afganistan.

No doubt it's nice to have, but a requirement?
Years ago I had a 30' cabin cruiser that we kept in PC Beach FL. It didn't have AC. When tied to the dock it sucked till it cooled off enough in the evening, which generally meant the wee hours of the morning. Anchored out it cooled off rather nicely most nights after sunset. Mainly because you would swing into the wind and get a decent airflow through the boat. We mostly stayed topside and under the bimini to stay cool.
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Old 10-05-2012, 02:07 PM   #99
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We use a Kuerig one cup at at ime..easy to use underway...

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Old 10-06-2012, 12:56 AM   #100
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OK, we boil the water in a kettle on our diesel stove or on our Origo one burner alcohol stove, make the coffee using rediground from a can, drip into a carafe and when that turns cold reheat the stuff not always missing the boil so then have to add a bit of water to deaden the sharp taste.

MMMMMMM
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