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Old 06-26-2012, 08:58 PM   #1
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How do you do your boating

Something that Sunchaser said got me to thinking, and that is not always a good thing. He recommended a reputable yard for installs to repair and back up warranty claims. Nothing wrong with that. It is just that because of the way I do my boating, I don't really consider that.

People on this forum use their boats in various ways. LarryM is a passagemaking cruiser, some move North to South with the sun, some home base out of a permanent slip or mooring, and then there is my situation. I guess I am more of an itinerant type boater. We move the boat around for cruising and exploring different areas in detail. We may be anywhere from the Chesapeake to South Florida or in between. We took a slip in Ft. Pierce for a year. Where we go next we don't know. However, something will peak our interest. We currently live 10 hours from the boat. When we get there, we spend a couple of days stocking up and getting ready. Then we cruise. So, when something fails we are usually miles away from anyone that may have installed it. Like this cruise was in the Bahamas where limited services are available. Places where you had better be fairly self sufficient.

We enjoy different venues and meeting new people. We have found that people are usually great wherever we go. Wherever the boat is I feel at home.

That being said, it will be interesting to hear your boating style and also plans for later. I am sure that i didn't touch on them all.
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Old 06-26-2012, 10:06 PM   #2
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That being said, it will be interesting to hear your boating style and also plans for later. I am sure that i didn't touch on them all.
Day use of our sailboat for fun and fishing is the current extent. Our near future plans call for extensive local inshore cruising(overnights). Long term plan is for either a power cruiser or motor sail boat for more extensive coastal cruising(Alaska to Panama roughly).

I will say I've followed your blog and posts and see an appeal of what appears(from my side of the screen anyway) to be fly in boating. It has opened my eyes to a different way of doing things.
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Old 06-26-2012, 11:01 PM   #3
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We usually make a yearly trip 3-4 months along the Gulf Coast down to Southern, Florida. usually as far as Ft Myers/Sanibel. in 2011 we did make it down to the Keys coming back up the east coast of FL across L.Okeechobee to Ft Myers then back home. We have made lots of friends along the way, some boaters, some not we enjoy spending time with them. We don't anchor out as osften as we plan to seems there is always something we want to do at or near a marina. When we do anchor out we do enjoy it, the avatar pix was taken at Pelican Bay a couple of years ago,. I'd love to make a trip Island hopping down to Puerto Rico then back but, it doesn't look like it is in the cards now, maybe the loop at least the St Johns and Bahamas.
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Old 06-27-2012, 12:08 AM   #4
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Our boat is on a trailer at the house when it's not in the water. Our 'cruises' start when we hit the road and continue when we get to the water. On the road we eat/sleep aboard, overnighting in WalMart parking lots (Wallydocking) but also in Rest Areas and anywhere else that's handy. On the water we'll always overnight on the hook, sometimes a week or more at a time, often with family for a total of 4 adults a baby and 2 dogs. We'll be towing 2,000 miles to Powell in Sept to spend a couple weeks on the water there. We probably won't tow more than 350 miles/day...there's no hurry and we enjoy the road almost as much as the water.

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Old 06-27-2012, 08:18 AM   #5
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Jeffnic, you've got the best of both worlds - an RV on floats. I wish I'd done that 20 years ago!

Our boating now consists of local weekend anchorages generally once a month or spending time at our slip for a day or two. We've owned the boat 2 years and we've done two long cruises, one to the Keys and recently the Bahamas. Our blog of the Bahamas: flyinlowboat.wordpress.com
Throw in a couple of 4 day cruises and that's about it for us.

I'm considering retiring within the next year or two, and we want to take the boat to the Chesapeake with a side trip down the St. Johns river starting at Jacksonville Fl. This will take a year. After that maybe on up to Canada, but finances will dictate where we go after the first year.

I enjoy anchoring but will admit staying at a marina has it's advantages. It's nice not to have to deploy the dinghy every time and just stepping off the boat and walking to get supplies or sightseeing is nice. But some of the best times we've had on the boat is watching the sun set, drink in hand at a nice anchorage. Steve mentioned the Pelican Bay anchorage where his avatar pictures was taken, that's one of our favorites.

The picture below was taken in Bakers Bay off of Great Guana Cay in the Abacos.
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Old 06-27-2012, 08:56 AM   #6
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Our boat is on a trailer at the house when it's not in the water. Our 'cruises' start when we hit the road and continue when we get to the water. On the road we eat/sleep aboard, overnighting in WalMart parking lots (Wallydocking) but also in Rest Areas and anywhere else that's handy. .......
Jeff, I noticed that one of the local Walmarts has signs prohibiting overnight parking of trailers, etc., yet I've been to others that had several campers and boats that apparently spent the night. I've also seen "No Overnight Parking" signs in many highway rest stops.

Have you ever had a problem in these places or been told to leave?
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Old 06-27-2012, 09:02 AM   #7
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We keep our boat in a marina just 20 minutes or so from home. We often spend the weekend on it in the slip or take a lunch to the boat during the week.

When we take the boat out, it's nearly always for a couple days or more. The last trip was 31 days but most are a week or so.

As for installations and repairs, I keep a pretty complete set of tools on the boat and do most of the work myself. I won't do bottom painting or serious fiberglass repairs, and I would have to call in a mechanic if I needed serious engine work, but I can handle most other things.
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Old 06-27-2012, 10:01 AM   #8
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We are planning on moving onboard. It is going to be our Condo on the Water. We are currently docked at a marina, and I am repairing required systems to make a life aboard comfortable for the 3 of us.
Plan is to day/weekend cruise while living on board until we have enough in the kitty and the jobs are no longer needed and pulling lines in and headed south.. for good.
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Old 06-27-2012, 10:47 AM   #9
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Ours is kept behind the house (I refused to buy a house in S. Fl that couldn't accommodate a reasonable boat). This allows the most convenient boating I could imagine. We like to overnight but its also nothing for us to go for a ride on the spur of the moment since our boat is always kept "ready-to-use" with no prep needed unless we are staying for several nights.
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Old 06-27-2012, 10:53 AM   #10
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Ron,
My guess is that the No Overnight Walmart signs are to keep things sane. The Folly Beach Walmart doesn't want people using their lot as a base for a week or month long vacation at the beach. The Daytona Walmart doesn't want their lot choked with bikers and tents. Some signs are to encourage you to pay for a campsite nearby. We've seen Walmart lots where 3 or more RV's have their slide outs out, awnings down, picnic tables w/ TV's, BBQ's and lawn chairs set up community fashion. In some places this is OK, but in others it is totally unacceptable. The signs are a way to discourage/enforce. We honored those signs until we pulled into a lot very late, and on our way out the next morning saw the No Overnight Parking sign -- this was at Daytona. Today we 'consider' the signs, but more often than not we stay anyway but with the smallest footprint possible (although we often run the generator all night).

But to answer your question...No, we've never been approached anywhere, signs or no signs, parking lots or rest areas, and been told to leave.
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Old 06-27-2012, 10:59 AM   #11
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We are currently on an 8 week cruise in B.C. This is our typical summer routine. When the admiral retires we will depart in May and quite in late Sept. thus giving us time to do SE Alaska.

At some point, we may have the boat trucked to Wisconsin for a couple of years of the loop/Bahamas/etc.

During the 'off-season' we cruise some weekends and usually 10 days in May as a shake down for the summer trip.

As we live more than an hour from the boat and it lives in the big city, we also use it for lots of overnights when in the city.

Concerning things that break, until you get far enough north in BC, there are usually pretty good chandleries and most parts can be flown in if necessary.

As I am sure most on this forum do, lots of preventative maint. helps to keep the surprises at bay. Plus LOTS of spares aboard.
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Old 06-27-2012, 03:12 PM   #12
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Ron,
My guess is that the No Overnight Walmart signs are to keep things sane. The Folly Beach Walmart doesn't want people using their lot as a base for a week or month long vacation at the beach. The Daytona Walmart doesn't want their lot choked with bikers and tents. Some signs are to encourage you to pay for a campsite nearby. We've seen Walmart lots where 3 or more RV's have their slide outs out, awnings down, picnic tables w/ TV's, BBQ's and lawn chairs set up community fashion. In some places this is OK, but in others it is totally unacceptable. The signs are a way to discourage/enforce. We honored those signs until we pulled into a lot very late, and on our way out the next morning saw the No Overnight Parking sign -- this was at Daytona. Today we 'consider' the signs, but more often than not we stay anyway but with the smallest footprint possible (although we often run the generator all night).

But to answer your question...No, we've never been approached anywhere, signs or no signs, parking lots or rest areas, and been told to leave.
The one I'm thinking of is well off the Interstate so maybe that's the difference. It's also possible that they've had problems there because it's pretty much in the city.
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Old 06-27-2012, 03:57 PM   #13
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As most of you know we live on the Eagle year around, so in a sense we use the boat every day. However over the 17 years we have owned the Eagle the hours away of the dock has declined from 100 hour down to 6 hours last year. However we still have/use the first boat I owned, a 1970 19 ft Chrysler with a 140 ho Merc. OB, 12 ft Livingston 25 hp Merc ob, and a 12 ft rowing/sailing dink with a 4 hp Merc. most days during the summer warmer months. So we use the smaller boats/dinks daily and the less time the Eagle is away from the dock. For the last 5+ years, I have not enjoy takeing the Eagle out as its just TOO!

However, July 1, 2014, I am planning on retiring so the plan is to start cruising with the Eagle around the PWN. For the local/Protect water we will two the 19 ft run about and carry the Livingston. Jim, owner if a sister 58 up in Canada, has offered to take us under his guidance until we feel comfortable being on our own. During the warmer months we plan to live on the Eagle and in the cold moths head out to warmer climes with the RV.

However, for the next two years we will probable less than 10 hours on the Eagle each year and use the smaller boats for daily use.
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Old 06-27-2012, 04:55 PM   #14
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Let's see how do I do my boating.

I have a slow boat. 7.5 knts. The closest anything is at least 14 hours away.
So I go out on weekends usually to a small cove or a fishing spot.
Anchor up in the evening and back to the harbor on sunday afternoon.

There are no Marinas or communities. No services. No restaurants. No fuel. No groceries. The closests is the native village of Cheniga on Latouche island. Next is Valdez or Cordova both require crossing a portion of the gulf of alaska.

So I take everything I need for self sufficiency and head out on the water.

So far I have always made it back on my own power.( Knock on wood )

Every trip is an adventure.

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Old 06-27-2012, 08:07 PM   #15
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right now it's weekends from May till early November with one or two week long cruises in the Chesapeake each year. Will retire in a couple years and get serious up and down the east coast and out to the Bahamas
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Old 06-27-2012, 09:17 PM   #16
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just simple river cruising for me, something kind of like this:

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Old 06-27-2012, 11:59 PM   #17
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My Boating
After many years of working in the marine industry I started thinking about building myself a boat. In Kaohsiung, I meet a man who was building a boat there. One of the interesting things in his boat was a dentist chair set up in the saloon. He explained he had been a dentist for 40 years and didn’t want to stop practicing, so he planned to provide free dental services as he traveled around. This stuck with me and when I learned people of the western pacific and Philippines islands are spread over thousands of small islands many under serviced, I started thinking, I needed a blue water capable boat that was fast (up to 400 miles per day) easy on fuel and with a cargo capability of around 5 tons. I ended up with a power tri, lacking creature comforts, (except air conditioning), but meeting many of my other goals, I took on the mission to provide free logistical support to organizations with educational, scientific, environmental, and medical interests, operating in remote areas of the Western Pacific and Philippine islands. I have carried scientist, books, medicines, relief good, and teachers. I try to get out at least every other month. Trips vary from two weeks to a few days. The next trip is out to Scarborough Shoal, where we are handing over a few roasted pigs and fruit to the Philippine service men on station there, and then we load books for a few island schools on around Palawan. For now this is how I use my boat and enjoy every trip.
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Old 06-28-2012, 12:50 AM   #18
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My Boating
After many years of working in the marine industry I started thinking about building myself a boat. In Kaohsiung, I meet a man who was building a boat there. One of the interesting things in his boat was a dentist chair set up in the saloon. He explained he had been a dentist for 40 years and didnít want to stop practicing, so he planned to provide free dental services as he traveled around. This stuck with me and when I learned people of the western pacific and Philippines islands are spread over thousands of small islands many under serviced, I started thinking, I needed a blue water capable boat that was fast (up to 400 miles per day) easy on fuel and with a cargo capability of around 5 tons. I ended up with a power tri, lacking creature comforts, (except air conditioning), but meeting many of my other goals, I took on the mission to provide free logistical support to organizations with educational, scientific, environmental, and medical interests, operating in remote areas of the Western Pacific and Philippine islands. I have carried scientist, books, medicines, relief good, and teachers. I try to get out at least every other month. Trips vary from two weeks to a few days. The next trip is out to Scarborough Shoal, where we are handing over a few roasted pigs and fruit to the Philippine service men on station there, and then we load books for a few island schools on around Palawan. For now this is how I use my boat and enjoy every trip.
That is really cool, boating with a purpose. Thank you for the wonderful idea and for your service to your local area.
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Old 06-28-2012, 07:31 AM   #19
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My Boating
After many years of working in the marine industry I started thinking about building myself a boat. In Kaohsiung, I meet a man who was building a boat there. One of the interesting things in his boat was a dentist chair set up in the saloon. He explained he had been a dentist for 40 years and didnít want to stop practicing, so he planned to provide free dental services as he traveled around. This stuck with me and when I learned people of the western pacific and Philippines islands are spread over thousands of small islands many under serviced, I started thinking, I needed a blue water capable boat that was fast (up to 400 miles per day) easy on fuel and with a cargo capability of around 5 tons. I ended up with a power tri, lacking creature comforts, (except air conditioning), but meeting many of my other goals, I took on the mission to provide free logistical support to organizations with educational, scientific, environmental, and medical interests, operating in remote areas of the Western Pacific and Philippine islands. I have carried scientist, books, medicines, relief good, and teachers. I try to get out at least every other month. Trips vary from two weeks to a few days. The next trip is out to Scarborough Shoal, where we are handing over a few roasted pigs and fruit to the Philippine service men on station there, and then we load books for a few island schools on around Palawan. For now this is how I use my boat and enjoy every trip.
Well, don't ask, and don't learn. I could never have imagined that there would be such a reply on this thread. It is wonderful that you have found a use for your boat that satisfies both a desire for cruising and a need in your area. My hat is off to you, sir. Truly a wonderful use.
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Old 06-28-2012, 12:33 PM   #20
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Thanks Don for asking the question! Boatgm's response brought a tear to my eye. How wonderful.

My answer is far less interesting. We moved our boat to the California Delta, a warmer area than our "normal" boating grounds of the San Francisco Bay, a few months ago. Pretty much every Friday we hop in the car for the 2 or 3 hour drive up there. Last Friday the traffic was so bad that we stopped for an hour for dinner to let it clear up. We usually head out on Saturday to anchor somewhere overnight and come back in Sunday afternoon and drive home. Occasionally we will stay on the boat at the marina and do boat projects. We also take the occasional long weekend and stay anchored in one spot for a few days. We head up tomorrow for a week on the boat and plan to anchor out most of the week, with a visit to a marina at some point to take on diesel. There are tons of places to anchor out and lots of marinas, towns and yacht clubs to visit as well if we want "civilization." Every marine service you can think of is available, at reasonable prices.
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