Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-25-2016, 11:36 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 204
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post

Sad thing is...boating really isn't all that hard...
I just got back from helping an inexperienced gent move his new-to-him old boat some four hundred miles. Volunteered..no charge. Twin diesel boat had been having fuel starvation problems, so that was a known, although the tanks were supposedly cleaned by a professional. Unanticipated failures encountered during the three day trip included instantaneous disconnect of a propeller shaft coupling while at high power on plane, dual alternator failure, fresh water system failure, transmission shifting problems, depth finder failure, and 20+ power failures from fuel starvation. Some "uncomfortable" moments including the shaft disconnect and the subsequent entry into a crowded marina with very tight turns while on one engine (the wrong one for what had to be done). Tiny rudders, balky shifter, tight spaces. There are instances where boating can be "hard".

While the boat made it to destination with minimal expense to the owner, the trip was anything but easy. In this situation the roles and responsibilities of the owner and the "assist" skipper can become very blurred. I found myself being forced to take on far more responsibility for decision making and safety of the boat and crew than I had imagined or wanted. Same could happen with a hired captain riding with an owner. Who's in charge...
__________________
Advertisement

go-planing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2016, 12:24 PM   #22
Guru
 
Capt.Bill11's Avatar
 
City: Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 5,422
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaltyDawg86 View Post
I was more than capable of running a 25ft single screw boat at 15, at 19 I was running a 36ft twin screw fishing boat, at 22 I was running a 5400 hp zdrive tug that was 82ft and at 27 I was running a 6000 hp, 320 OSV. No tugs or pilots on that boat, did the boat handling on my own (when I was on watch). Like I said, pretty qualified.
Handling the boat is the easy part.
__________________

Capt.Bill11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2016, 12:26 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
SaltyDawg86's Avatar
 
City: Carrollton, Va
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt.Bill11 View Post
Handling the boat is the easy part.
It's all easy compared to working in the oil field.
SaltyDawg86 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2016, 12:37 PM   #24
Guru
 
Capt.Bill11's Avatar
 
City: Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 5,422
Quote:
Originally Posted by semi-planing View Post
Who's in charge...
I try to make that clear from the start.

Only had an issue with it once.
Capt.Bill11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2016, 03:48 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
funangler's Avatar
 
City: Erie PA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Endless Endeavor
Vessel Model: Custom
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 214
At the dock it is the owner until you decided to leave the dock then it is up to the captain is my rule of thumb.
funangler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2016, 06:57 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
SaltyDawg86's Avatar
 
City: Carrollton, Va
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 395
SD you already know who is in charge, look at you El Faro comments....
SaltyDawg86 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2016, 07:16 PM   #27
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,265
Know your limitations.

__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2016, 07:31 PM   #28
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,937
Quote:
Originally Posted by semi-planing View Post
I just got back from helping an inexperienced gent move his new-to-him old boat some four hundred miles. Volunteered..no charge. Twin diesel boat had been having fuel starvation problems, so that was a known, although the tanks were supposedly cleaned by a professional. Unanticipated failures encountered during the three day trip included instantaneous disconnect of a propeller shaft coupling while at high power on plane, dual alternator failure, fresh water system failure, transmission shifting problems, depth finder failure, and 20+ power failures from fuel starvation. Some "uncomfortable" moments including the shaft disconnect and the subsequent entry into a crowded marina with very tight turns while on one engine (the wrong one for what had to be done). Tiny rudders, balky shifter, tight spaces. There are instances where boating can be "hard".

While the boat made it to destination with minimal expense to the owner, the trip was anything but easy. In this situation the roles and responsibilities of the owner and the "assist" skipper can become very blurred. I found myself being forced to take on far more responsibility for decision making and safety of the boat and crew than I had imagined or wanted. Same could happen with a hired captain riding with an owner. Who's in charge...
Some people make everything in life hard...

In your one trip you had more failures than I have had in 45 years of personal boats, hundreds of deliveries, and 15 years of running commercial boats..maybe that should tell you something..

Every weekend completely clueless boaters take their boats out and have a great time....yes a few have issues...but most dont.

Boating is relatively easy if not in over your head.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2016, 07:46 PM   #29
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,265
If you had properly blessed your boat, any serious problems wouldn't occur until you had entered your home berth. That's been my experience.



As when a portion of my propeller shaft fell apart:

__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2016, 09:30 PM   #30
Guru
 
Capt.Bill11's Avatar
 
City: Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 5,422
Quote:
Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
Know your limitations.

As a captain your "limitations" are pretty well spelled out.
Capt.Bill11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2016, 10:51 PM   #31
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 204
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Some people make everything in life hard...

In your one trip you had more failures than I have had in 45 years of personal boats, hundreds of deliveries, and 15 years of running commercial boats..maybe that should tell you something..

Every weekend completely clueless boaters take their boats out and have a great time....yes a few have issues...but most dont.

Boating is relatively easy if not in over your head.

No, some people take on hard things in life...

You clearly only operate well maintained equipment. This boat was not that and I knew it.
go-planing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2016, 04:06 AM   #32
TF Site Team
 
ksanders's Avatar
 
City: SEWARD ALASKA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: LISAS WAY
Vessel Model: BAYLINER 4788
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,956
Quote:
Originally Posted by semi-planing View Post
No, some people take on hard things in life...

You clearly only operate well maintained equipment. This boat was not that and I knew it.
That statement right there is the root of the problem.

Why would anybody leave on a delivery trip in a boat that was known to be not running right.

It seems to me that anybody doing that is asking for trouble. Why not fix any mechanical issues that could affect the trip beforehand.
__________________
Kevin Sanders
Bayliner 4788
Seward, Alaska
www.mvlisasway.com
ksanders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2016, 06:01 AM   #33
TF Site Team
 
Bay Pelican's Avatar
 
City: Chicago, IL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bay Pelican
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,796
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksanders View Post
That statement right there is the root of the problem.

Why would anybody leave on a delivery trip in a boat that was known to be not running right.

It seems to me that anybody doing that is asking for trouble. Why not fix any mechanical issues that could affect the trip beforehand.
Amen
__________________
Marty
Bay Pelican is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2016, 07:26 AM   #34
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,937
Wow!

My prior post about boating is usually pretty easy stuff seems to have taken traction....wish it hadnt.....

But......

The statement about it can be hard and how an almost unbelievable amount of bad stuff happened in one trip ( more problems than most have in a lifetime)....was interesting....

When that was pointed out...it was because he took a trip in a boat that he KNEW would be hard...and some people take on things that are HARD.

Can't say for anyone else.....but that logic sounds a LOT like Washington, DC ese......

And no, the boats I run are not well maintained.....they are small business marine operations where to keep going duct tape, pipe patches, jumper wires, old fuel, etc..etc...are all in place. But even delivering brand new boats from the factory have issues.

Small on the go repairs that are a PIA aren't really all that hard...if they are....just call an assistance tower. $175 could have made that marina entry stressless.

If the trip is too remote for assistance towing...taking a known disaster on a delivery sounds like, well, we all know.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2016, 07:42 AM   #35
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,937
The comment about delivery skippers versus owner can be blurred if you let it.

In writing, it isn't blurry.

I spell it out....I am either a navagation and mate if the owner is competent and just needs a second hand or comforting.....or captain and they understand that.

Usually it isn't a big deal, because even before we board the bost....they know who really is in charge when things get pst them.

The issue is worse when 2 delivery captains are aboard and it is not clear of their roles....next time I do one of those, I want it spelled out better.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2016, 09:07 AM   #36
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,986
In all the posts I read... never heard what is considered the average "per day rate" for hiring a Captain; sans food, dock, fuel, repair, boarding, travel costs etc.

4, 5, 6, 7 hundred dollars...??
Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2016, 09:13 AM   #37
Guru
 
City: Hotel, CA
Country: Fried
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 8,328
Not sure Art but if it's $700/day plus expenses I'm telling my boss to pound salt come Monday.
__________________
Craig

It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they've been fooled - Mark Twain
CPseudonym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2016, 09:28 AM   #38
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,986
Quote:
Originally Posted by CPseudonym View Post
Not sure Art but if it's $700/day plus expenses I'm telling my boss to pound salt come Monday.
The word "salary" comes from the word "salt". That makes no never mind to anything much... just thought I'd mention in regard to your desire for boss pounding! - LOL
Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2016, 10:04 AM   #39
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,937
Really depends on the boat and delivery.

A 30 foot Sea Ray for a day might $300 plus transportation to/from....but no per diem.

Even that is high as some whipped snapper looking for experience, and there are plenty around will do it for $100.

Delivering a 3 million plus, newer yacht down the coastand I have no idea as I would probably never break into the limited circle of delivery captains despite my quals. That Capt and crew might be close to $1000 a day ($500 per captain, $250 for each crew)...but Capt Bill or BandB I am sure have more current/accurate info.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2016, 11:20 AM   #40
Guru
 
Capt.Bill11's Avatar
 
City: Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 5,422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art View Post
In all the posts I read... never heard what is considered the average "per day rate" for hiring a Captain; sans food, dock, fuel, repair, boarding, travel costs etc.

4, 5, 6, 7 hundred dollars...??

$250 - $400 or so per day depending on the size of the boat and type of trip for a captain.

$100 - $200 or so for crew

Of course you have retired guys who'll do trips for next to nothing. Personally, I think they should stay home and let the rest of us make a living so we too can retire one day.
__________________

Capt.Bill11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012